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Wayne 962 Wayne 962 is offline
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First thing I had to do was disconnect the throttle body potentiometer plug because that wire harness was in the way. Be careful not to drop the small wire clips into the recesses of the engine.



Using a very long set of needle-nose pliers, pull up on the connector and remove it carefully from the pressure switch.



There was a fuel line that was running right through the area I needed to get to, so I had to disconnect that from the main connection.




With the fuel line and harness out of the way, you can see the pressure switch. Don't let this photo deceive you - it's way the heck back there, I'm surprised my camera got this shot.



Unfortunately, while moving stuff around, one of the small rubber mounts that hold on a fuel pressure regulator broke off. With no room in there at all, there's really no hope of getting the other metal piece off of the intake manifold without dropping the engine. Stuff like this always frustrates me, because the perfect solution would be to replace with a brand new part. But, you'd have to tear a whole bunch of stuff apart just to reach the part that broke while you were tearing other stuff apart. The likelihood of damaging something else may be high too. In this case, I opted to get some super-strength epoxy and glue the rubber and metal piece back together. The rubber did not get damaged, it simply came unglued from where the factory had glued it 20 years earlier. Still, I'm never happy when things like this happen, particularly on a car like this. If the engine gets dropped in the future, I will be sure to replace this part (probably all of the mounts) with new ones.



Left - too short. Right - too long. Middle - just right. I went to the hardware store down the street, and all they had was a deep socket like the on on the right. (tip: 15/16th = 24mm which is the diameter for this switch). So, they were kind enough to cut the darn thing on their huge wheel grinder. Took about 1 minute, and the thing was very hot, but it fit! The long socket was too long because the top hit the top of the intake charge tube. As in many other cases, nothing beats having (or making) the right tool for the job.

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Wayne R. Dempsey, Founder, Pelican Parts Inc., and Author of:
101 Projects for Your BMW 3-Series 101 Projects for Your Porsche 911 How to Rebuild & Modify Porsche 911 Engines 101 Projects for Your Porsche Boxster & Cayman 101 Projects for Your Porsche 996 / 997
Coming in 2014:
101 Projects for Your MINI Cooper
Old 10-23-2007, 08:49 PM
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