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e170drvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Evansville IN
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Garage
BOV question

On which tb port should a 964 style bov be using? Should the valve be opened under partial throttle (no boost) or open only when the throttle is completely closed? I recently switched ports and found that the performance was much better (vacuum retard port) as soon as the throttle plate opens the bov closes. I have noticed that my throttle response and spool time have improved significantly.

Eric
87 930
Old 09-28-2007, 10:57 AM
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I have mine connected to the T on the throttle body...opposite side of where the WUR enrichment vacuum line conects. From what I understand, it needs a source below the throttle body butterfly.
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back in the saddle: '95 993 - just another black C2
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Old 09-28-2007, 12:20 PM
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That is right, it should connect after the throttlebody (intake manifold)...
When the throttle plate shuts, the intake sees vacuum, and opens the BOV which then allows boost from the turbo to recirculate and allow the turbo impeller to "free wheel" and avoid stalling between shifts...

Last edited by E-man930; 09-28-2007 at 12:40 PM..
Old 09-28-2007, 12:37 PM
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Anyone know what oil would be considered the best for the factory blow off or recirculation valve?
I'm currently using shooters choice FP-10 which is a very light weight high quality non gumming oil used to lubricate the actions of firearms, and fishing reels, etc.
Not sure what would be best though and it seems motor oil would be too thick or viscous and might slow down the reaction speed of the piston that acts as the blow off valve.
Old 09-28-2007, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JFairman View Post
Anyone know what oil would be considered the best for the factory blow off or recirculation valve?
I'm currently using shooters choice FP-10 which is a very light weight high quality non gumming oil used to lubricate the actions of firearms, and fishing reels, etc.
Not sure what would be best though and it seems motor oil would be too thick or viscous and might slow down the reaction speed of the piston that acts as the blow off valve.


OEM valves require no oiling. If it's sticking it should be replaced. Certain aftermarket valves(Forge, TXS, ect) that use orings vs diaphrams to retain the vacuum signal seal should be cleaned with a tack free cloth and the orings lubed with a lightweight lube. I use a very thin coating of redline assembly lube.
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Old 09-30-2007, 05:27 AM
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No oil on the piston?
I can't believe that... it's metal to metal contact and moving to some degree every time you move the gas pedal therefore changing manifold vacuum while the motor is running.
It's an aluminum piston in a magnesium housing/cylinder.
I can't believe you can leave that dry, it will score and wear out real quickly if no lubricant is on it.
I believe it should be oiled lightly with a thin synthetic oil when you assemble it, and I was asking what other people with experience have used with good success.
Old 10-01-2007, 09:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JFairman View Post
No oil on the piston?
I can't believe that... it's metal to metal contact and moving to some degree every time you move the gas pedal therefore changing manifold vacuum while the motor is running.
It's an aluminum piston in a magnesium housing/cylinder.
I can't believe you can leave that dry, it will score and wear out real quickly if no lubricant is on it.
I believe it should be oiled lightly with a thin synthetic oil when you assemble it, and I was asking what other people with experience have used with good success.

We're not talking about the same OEM compressor bypass valve here....I was referring to the black plastic Bosch unit. You can't take them apart and oil them...thus why I said no oiling. They're disposable and if sticking, should be tossed and replaced with a new OEM or aftermarket unit. Aftermarket valves(aka metal replacements like the Forge units) should use an oil on the orings and that I use thin Redline assembly lube.

The metal units should use a high temp lube. You want to use something that doesn't gum up under heat and use, yet run away from the friction surfaces when it gets hot and fluid. Thin engine prelubes, like the Redline, are great for this.

Some aftermarket metal on metal valves specify no oil as it collects contaminates on the valve and can jam it. TXS is one company that uses brass pistons in an aluminum bore. 99% of the time though, these are atmospheric valves and have no reference to Porsche.....


Hope that clarified it a bit. This is what I've used from my experience with the valves. I apologize that my posts are often misread
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Old 10-01-2007, 11:27 AM
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Ok, thanks.
I'm guessing the FP-10 I'm using is good enough then seeing as it is a thin weight non gumming oil used to lubricate the actions of high speed automatic weapons.... definately a high heat, life dependent in some situations application.
Old 10-01-2007, 11:57 AM
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