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I think mine needs to be replaced as well, it just stays on 2 when the engine it turned off ?
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Old 06-01-2012, 12:31 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
83 911 Production Cab #10
 
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Originally Posted by SEE YA View Post
I think mine needs to be replaced as well, it just stays on 2 when the engine it turned off ?
Do the tesl as per post 14.

The problem could be that the wire in the engine compartment get cooked and develop resistance (and get very hard in the first foot cap side.

If you got the same result as BMAN, you need a new sender.

If the guage shows 2 when you ground it, the problem is more likely with the cable. I change mine by splicing a new one about 2 feet from the connector.
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:35 AM
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Thanks will try on Sunday.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:32 AM
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Just replaced my sender this weekend ... Here's what worked for me and my '89 Turbo

First off, sorry for the novel, but this job is more involved than it might first appear. History -- My oil pressure gauge was reading 0, however the oil light would turn off right after start up. I was confident my engine was getting oil and that my problem was either the sender, the gauge, or the wiring between the two.

To check to see if the gauge is good, disconnect the wire from the sender. Turn your key to the accessory position and your oil pressure gauge should peg at 5. Now ground the wire (I had to use a long wire extension to ground it on the door jamb). Your gauge should go to 0. If this happens, your gauge should be OK as well as the wiring.

To check to see if the sender is bad without removing it (a total pain in the butt), you need to test resistance. Use a multi-meter and set it to OHMs. Disconnect the wire from the sender and attach the red lead to the sender's prong. Then attach the black lead to a grounding point. Start your car (if you know for sure you have oil pressure) and measure the resistance. If the sender is good, you should get fluctuating readings with changes in RPM. If the sender is bad, it should read infinity.

Reference the following diagram for the rest of my thread:



Now there are all sorts of techniques to replace the sender, however I RECOMMEND NOT USING A CROWS FOOT WRENCH . . . PERIOD! If your sender is like mine (and several other Pelicans out there), it is really attached to the sending unit mounting block tight! The sending unit mounting block (#46) is attached to the aluminum engine case with a hollow oil line through bolt" (#48), and may not be able to withstand the level of torque placed on it when the crows foot technique is used. If the through bolt snaps off, your next thread is going to be "how do I remove a broken bolt from my engine case??" People who have successfully used the crows foot technique have gotten lucky IMHO.

Since my sender was definitely bad, I knew it needed to be replaced. I read several previous threads on the subject and felt I had a pretty good handle on how to do it. Also, someone had asked if you needed to drain the oil to replace the sender. You do not.

I contemplated removing the A/C bracket, but didn't want to mess with removing the muffler. So I disconnected the A/C belt and moved the compressor all the way to the right. That gave me enough access to loosen the oil line nut (#32) with a 14mm wrench (with another wrench on as an extension to give me some more leverage). This nut connects the oil line to the though bolt, and was on there pretty tight so don't give up. Also, it will be very difficult to back the metal oil line out unless you disconnect the line from the side of the engine. Just trace the oil line back and you will see where it connects to the engine on the right side just below your oil filter. This is an easy connection to get off (17mm).

With the oil line disconnected, I was able to rotate the sender mounting block down a bit which gave me better access to the oil line through bolt (#48). You will need a 17mm wrench to loosen this. This is very tedious (1/8 turns and a lot of wrench flipping, but stay with it). With the through bolt loosened, I was able to remove the sender and sending block as a single assembly. I took the assembly over to my vice and was able to remove the sender from the block. I AM SO GLAD I DIDN'T USE A CROWS FOOT. I'm 200 lbs and really had to lean into it to snap it free. Once you have the through bolt in your hand, you will see how flimsy it is and why you don't want to put a whole bunch of torque on it.

Now with the sender off, just put the new one back on the block. You should replace the copper washer (#44) which did not come with my new sender so I had to make a quick trip to Auto Zone. Amazingly they had the same exact one I needed. Also, I would recommend you replace the two aluminum washers (#47) on either side of the sender block. Cheap insurance against future leaks.

From there it's just the reverse to put everything back together. BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO CROSSTHREAD THE THROUGH BOLT INTO YOUR ENGINE CASE!! This is easy to do if you are not careful. Also, one of the toughest things was getting the oil line nut (#32) to thread back onto the through bolt. Again, make sure you don't cross thread.

Once it was all back together everything worked perfectly. I let the car idle for a couple minutes to check for leaks. None. Then I drove it for a few miles and pulled over checking for leaks. None. This project took me a total of 6 hours on a Saturday morning. It will test your patience, but it is worth it to get accurate oil pressure readings. You can save money by purchasing a URO parts sender, but I decided to go with a genuine Porsche part (~$80). The washers are minimal so don't scrimp on those. Definitely replace them.

I hope this sheds some light on a process that worked for me. Again, this is what worked for me and my '89 so I am sure others will have opinions.
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Old 06-06-2012, 04:32 AM
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Thanks all printed off ready for me to try.
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Old 06-06-2012, 11:43 AM
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Hi i just changed mine last night I was lucky it took all of 10 min. I had and old wrench that I bent. so too night I am going to buy some Lotty tickets
Old 06-06-2012, 02:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorracer View Post
Hi i just changed mine last night I was lucky it took all of 10 min. I had and old wrench that I bent. so too night I am going to buy some Lotty tickets
Would you mind posting a picture of the wrench you bent? Did you need to remove the A/C? Thanks
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Old 06-06-2012, 05:56 PM
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Originally Posted by motorracer View Post
Hi i just changed mine last night I was lucky it took all of 10 min. I had and old wrench that I bent. so too night I am going to buy some Lotty tickets
Perhaps your sender had been replaced at some point before which explains why you were able to get it off with no problems. I know my sender was the original one (23 years old) and that sucker was on there really tight from the factory. There are a few past threads on the subject and several people confirm this. I just wasn't willing to take a gamble with the crows foot technique. I'd be looking at a big time repair bill (drop the engine and such) to fix that mess if the hollow through bolt broke off in the engine case. Again, that's just my perspective.

Just curious . . . did you bend the wrench while removing the sender or did you have to bend an old wrench to get access to the sender? You would think the Porsche engineers could have designed a simpler set up.
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Old 06-06-2012, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniff View Post
...and that sucker was on there really tight from the factory... There are a few past threads on the subject and several people confirm this. I just wasn't willing to take a gamble with the crows foot technique. I'd be looking at a big time repair bill (drop the engine and such) to fix that mess if the hollow through bolt broke off in the engine case...
+1

After seeing the bicycle wrench starting to bend, I did not push my luck.

Took the block out, cut the sender off leaving the "nut" still stuck in the block. It only came out at 140Psi... See post 15 of Stuck Oil Pressure Sender
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:37 AM
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I tried the crow's foot thing, had an oil leak. Ended up taking the oil line off, removing the block with sensor. I replaced the hollow bolt because I read where they can get cracked when doing the crow's foot, I think my old bolt was good. Anyway I replaced all the sealing washers, slapped it all back together and no more leaks.
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Old 06-07-2012, 02:56 AM
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Well update tested the wire, earth out with a bit of wire went to 0 then unpluged from the sender up to 5 .
So next test will be the sender itself which I think it is a fault?
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:11 AM
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If it does not come off easy in-situ, remove the whole unit (#43 to #48) on diagram in post # 24.

You don't want to end up with a broken banjo bolt in the casing or damage the casing.
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Last edited by JJ 911SC; 06-07-2012 at 07:51 PM..
Old 06-07-2012, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniff View Post
First off, sorry for the novel, but this job is more involved than it might first appear. History -- My oil pressure gauge was reading 0, however the oil light would turn off right after start up. I was confident my engine was getting oil and that my problem was either the sender, the gauge, or the wiring between the two.

To check to see if the gauge is good, disconnect the wire from the sender. Turn your key to the accessory position and your oil pressure gauge should peg at 5. Now ground the wire (I had to use a long wire extension to ground it on the door jamb). Your gauge should go to 0. If this happens, your gauge should be OK as well as the wiring.

To check to see if the sender is bad without removing it (a total pain in the butt), you need to test resistance. Use a multi-meter and set it to OHMs. Disconnect the wire from the sender and attach the red lead to the sender's prong. Then attach the black lead to a grounding point. Start your car (if you know for sure you have oil pressure) and measure the resistance. If the sender is good, you should get fluctuating readings with changes in RPM. If the sender is bad, it should read infinity.

Reference the following diagram for the rest of my thread:



Now there are all sorts of techniques to replace the sender, however I RECOMMEND NOT USING A CROWS FOOT WRENCH . . . PERIOD! If your sender is like mine (and several other Pelicans out there), it is really attached to the sending unit mounting block tight! The sending unit mounting block (#46) is attached to the aluminum engine case with a hollow oil line through bolt" (#48), and may not be able to withstand the level of torque placed on it when the crows foot technique is used. If the through bolt snaps off, your next thread is going to be "how do I remove a broken bolt from my engine case??" People who have successfully used the crows foot technique have gotten lucky IMHO.

Since my sender was definitely bad, I knew it needed to be replaced. I read several previous threads on the subject and felt I had a pretty good handle on how to do it. Also, someone had asked if you needed to drain the oil to replace the sender. You do not.

I contemplated removing the A/C bracket, but didn't want to mess with removing the muffler. So I disconnected the A/C belt and moved the compressor all the way to the right. That gave me enough access to loosen the oil line nut (#32) with a 14mm wrench (with another wrench on as an extension to give me some more leverage). This nut connects the oil line to the though bolt, and was on there pretty tight so don't give up. Also, it will be very difficult to back the metal oil line out unless you disconnect the line from the side of the engine. Just trace the oil line back and you will see where it connects to the engine on the right side just below your oil filter. This is an easy connection to get off (17mm).

With the oil line disconnected, I was able to rotate the sender mounting block down a bit which gave me better access to the oil line through bolt (#48). You will need a 17mm wrench to loosen this. This is very tedious (1/8 turns and a lot of wrench flipping, but stay with it). With the through bolt loosened, I was able to remove the sender and sending block as a single assembly. I took the assembly over to my vice and was able to remove the sender from the block. I AM SO GLAD I DIDN'T USE A CROWS FOOT. I'm 200 lbs and really had to lean into it to snap it free. Once you have the through bolt in your hand, you will see how flimsy it is and why you don't want to put a whole bunch of torque on it.

Now with the sender off, just put the new one back on the block. You should replace the copper washer (#44) which did not come with my new sender so I had to make a quick trip to Auto Zone. Amazingly they had the same exact one I needed. Also, I would recommend you replace the two aluminum washers (#47) on either side of the sender block. Cheap insurance against future leaks.

From there it's just the reverse to put everything back together. BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO CROSSTHREAD THE THROUGH BOLT INTO YOUR ENGINE CASE!! This is easy to do if you are not careful. Also, one of the toughest things was getting the oil line nut (#32) to thread back onto the through bolt. Again, make sure you don't cross thread.

Once it was all back together everything worked perfectly. I let the car idle for a couple minutes to check for leaks. None. Then I drove it for a few miles and pulled over checking for leaks. None. This project took me a total of 6 hours on a Saturday morning. It will test your patience, but it is worth it to get accurate oil pressure readings. You can save money by purchasing a URO parts sender, but I decided to go with a genuine Porsche part (~$80). The washers are minimal so don't scrimp on those. Definitely replace them.

I hope this sheds some light on a process that worked for me. Again, this is what worked for me and my '89 so I am sure others will have opinions.
So now you got me all paranoid about using the crows foot wrench. I looked into it this evening trying to figure out how to remove it like you did. If I remove the a/c unit it seems the bracket is still going to be in the way of the sensor and oil line. Not much room to work.
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:04 PM
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You are right, there isn't much room. Honestly, it felt like I was doing surgery . . . very tedious. However with the A/C belt removed and the compressor slid all the way to the right on its mounting bracket, you will have room. However it won't be much.

Try to loosen the oil line nut (#32) first. There is room for that and all you will need is a 14mm box wrench. I had to use another wrench as an extension to give me leverage since the nut was on there tight. I also disconnected the oil line from the side of the engine to allow the oil line to back away from the through bolt (#48). With the oil line disconnected, you can work on loosening the through bolt all the way. The force of loosening the #32 nut actually loosened the #48 thoughbolt. With the throughbolt slightly loosened, you can push the mounting block (#46) down to give you better access to the throughbolt (its 17 mm) which makes removal much easier.

I am not sure if this is the factory approved technique, but it worked for me and was suggested in another thread. I wasn't going to gamble with breaking the throughbolt in my engine case, so it was worth the a$$pain. Good luck. I'm curious to see if you come up with an easier way once you get into it.
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:33 PM
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Well after about three hours of playing around, it came off no problems with the block.

Just got to order a new one, and washers for the sender one of and the pipe it fits to four washers.

As people have said, access is your main problem with the sender.
Thank you once again people for your time and help.
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by SEE YA View Post
Well after about three hours of playing around, it came off no problems with the block.

Just got to order a new one, and washers for the sender one of and the pipe it fits to four washers.

As people have said, access is your main problem with the sender.
Thank you once again people for your time and help.
That's great to hear. How did you go about removing it? Did you do like sniff recommended?
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Old 06-13-2012, 03:17 PM
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Yes I did as sniff recommended it the access that makes it such a long job, if there was spanner that was bent a bit 17 mm it would be better. Once you get the first bite, on the nut you can then move the block and the sender down a bit so the the spanner get better access to the nut.
It's not ideal, turn flip turn flip on the nut until it comes off as one sender and block.
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Old 06-13-2012, 11:40 PM
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Yes I did as sniff recommended it the access that makes it such a long job, if there was spanner that was bent a bit 17 mm it would be better. Once you get the first bite, on the nut you can then move the block and the sender down a bit so the the spanner get better access to the nut.
It's not ideal, turn flip turn flip on the nut until it comes off as one sender and block.
Any pictures? Did you move the a/c back or remove it? Thanks
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:26 PM
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I will take some should you wish to see, I removed the A/C left the bracket .
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Old 06-14-2012, 08:46 PM
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Does anyone have the part no's for the washers that fit on the oil pipe to the sender, also the other end to the engine as well. Plus the washer part no's for the sender that fit between the sender block and the engine there should be two.

I need them to order replacements, for the refit of the new sender.

Thanks
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Old 06-15-2012, 12:52 PM
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