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I am not trying to tell anyone what they should do to there cars. I just posted what I did, and why I did it. I stated the experience I have with precision turbo.... Check out there reputation Precision Turbo and Engine: About Our Company

There reputation speaks for itself.

935 cars were not running full Bosch pro efi systems or any of the such either....Technology changes

Old 03-31-2013, 01:34 PM
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I work on naval ships and we use them on our diesel generators. These things run forever but it is in a controlled environment. I will have to dig a bit more to know what the reasons for using them is. It might just be to keep the maintainers safe. I will report back.
David
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1985 Black 930, K27 7006, Garretson Intercooler, Adj boost, TB: 23 - 31mm, bielstein sport shocks, ER polybronze bushings front and rear, ER monoball joints front and rear with offset camber plates, 935 X triangulated strut brace, raised spindles, racing bump steer kit
1981 Black 911sc (sold)
Old 03-31-2013, 07:48 PM
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Personally I would think if heat were such an issue they would have cooling fins on the hot side of the turbo. I wonder if there is a way to keep oil circulating with an electric pump after engine shut down.
Old 04-01-2013, 12:22 PM
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Ok guys.......since there were alot of questions, theories, and concerns I contacted PTP turbo blankets. I forwarded them the conversations on here to see what they could add to this.

They have been awesome everytime I have had a question or concern!

Here is what they wrote...

Hey Edward,


Radiant heat from the turbocharger is wasted energy. Energy makes turbos more efficient.




An example is when you heat fluid, the fluid moves faster. If the fluid is responsible for turning a wheel,

you would want the fluid to be moving as quickly as possible. Since the mass of the fluid is not affected

by the temperature, faster moving fluid will have greater momentum. When that momentum hits its object,

the resulting drop in velocity transfers momentum from the fluid to object.




Basically the more work the turbine does, the more efficient it will perform.




The cooling systems on turbocharged vehicles can handle the extra heat. The flow rate of coolant and oil

through the turbo is pretty high. With little wait time, the possibility of coking the oil while operating

is very low.




The rise in temperature from the turbo blanket is no where enough to transfer the heat from the

turbo to the oil given the short time the oil is actually in contact with the bearing components.




A lot of people think the blanket contains the radiant heat completely inside. This

is not true, the heat has to go somewhere, and it is still released out to the atmosphere.




This has been a long term debate and from the 8 years of being in the turbo blanket business, we have

never had a single customer have a turbo failure from their turbo blanket. Our blankets have been on

both race and street vehicles for over 5 years with no issues.




Do we believe that it's not possible for a turbo to fail under the load of a turbo blanket? No, not at all,

but we believe the chances of this happening are slim and will take a very long time. Unfortunately many will

have their disbelief and it will be a never ending debate.




We have yet to have a customer return a blanket because they were not happy with the results and performance

they saw just from this little modification. This is what we like to boast about.
Old 04-01-2013, 01:07 PM
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I think my main worry would be coking, but seeing as we aren't going to be doing long hard runs and turning our cars right off, it shouldn't matter much with us.
Old 04-01-2013, 03:11 PM
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Can someone identify the muffler on this car?

It looks like one of this but not sure.

SM-200-350-12
Old 04-03-2013, 10:47 AM
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It is a burns four inch muffler core we used and obviously modified
Old 04-03-2013, 11:01 AM
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I had a clue that it was a burns but I wasn't sure. Do you have the inlet/outlet diameter and a sound clip? I would like to see how it sounds.

Thanks!
Old 04-03-2013, 11:22 AM
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It's four inch on both inlet and outlet. Sorry no sound clip but it sounds amazing.
Old 04-03-2013, 11:24 AM
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PTP talks about performance, not longevity. Miles are not listed, years means nothing. It's what happens after you turn the engine off and the heat has nowhere to go that is of concern to street cars. Absolutley the oil will be more hot for a longer period of time than with no blanket (once the engine is off), if not then the blanket doesn't work. Heat is 1/2 of the equasion for turbo power so yes a blanket will improve performance. Heat is also the enemy of oil and metal so there is your compromise. If you don't drive your car a lot or don't mind a shorter turbo life then this is not a problem.
Yes a turbo oiler/timer will greatly help shed the heat soak once the engine is off.
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Old 04-03-2013, 05:17 PM
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I'm not sure what the big concern is. Turbos are more efficient with the more heat you feed into them all the way up to the point where things start to melt.

After seeing some of strokher's posts when his engine was for sale it should be obvious that his car is built for all out performance and I'm sure and extra oil change or two won't deter him from getting a little more out of his car.

The wrap looks great and your engine is a piece of art.
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Old 04-03-2013, 05:48 PM
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Sorry guys I have been on vacation. I forwarded them rarlyl8's concerns. Ptp responded right away saying the following

As you've suggested, the added heat in the turbocharger exhaust chamber, combined with the fact that this heat dissipates more slowly via natural convection with a turbo blanket installed, does make it more critical that a proper 'cool down ' process be instituted following every period of spirited driving. As you've indicated, there is a bit of a trade-off here. You get improved turbocharger performance and better engine bay heat protection with a turbo blanket, but you also have to be a little more responsible with the cool down process than you would with a factory setup. All turbocharger's cooling systems (either oil or oil and coolant) are designed to pull heat away from the turbocharger's bearings. The systems are designed to handle the dissipation of very high heat loads - much greater than your turbocharger would ever see, even with a turbo blanket. However, the cooling system is only effective while the engine is running.
(while the oil and/or coolant is circulating) The car's operator must allow the cooling system to do it's job to bring the turbocharger's temperature back down to normal levels after any period of aggressive driving. We recommend that you not shut off the engine directly after a hard run. We advise that you allow one to two minutes of cool down before killing the engine. You can either do this by waiting until that time has passed yourself or by installing a turbo timer. The real danger of heat in a turbocharger occurs when a very hot turbocharger is allowed to sit with no oil/coolant circulating. Heat soak occurs, causing the temperature of the turbo to actually rise for a period after the engine is turned off. When this happens, the oil in the turbocharger can heat to a point beyond what it's capable of handling. It can coke (cook and harden) and stick to the walls of the oil pathways in the turbo. This can eventually choke off the supply of oil to the turbo, preventing the cooling system from doing its job. Long enough periods without proper cooling can cause premature bearing failure in the turbocharger. All of this can be avoided by simply allowing a proper cool down after each period of spirited driving. We have seen absolutely no evidence that the usage of a turbo blanket reduces the lifespan of a turbocharger anywhere when the proper cool down process is instituted consistently."

Thanks a lot Edward, we have engineers and mechanics and very smart brains who work at PTP and we are glad to answer every concern that anyone might have.
Old 04-09-2013, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RarlyL8 View Post
Nice looking system!
Heat would be elevated and retained in the turbo after shutdown, no doubt about that. If these turbos can take it great, but for how long? If this is a racing application life is measured in hours not thousands of miles. Engine oil type must be a consideration as well. The specific "HighFlow" turbo mensioned has small clearances that are less tolerant of oil coking. Any metal covered in a blanket and cooked will have greatly decreased life expectancy. 321 stainless or inconel would last longer than typical 304; standard steel would be a pile of rust in a couple weeks.
Great solution for a race car but I would check with turbo manufacturers before using a blanket on a street car.
Turbo timers if your lazy, or 3-5 minutes of idling after hard use will do the trick if your worried.
Old 04-10-2013, 08:41 AM
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What a great looking header system!

Just my two cents.

The biggest reason to insulate exhaust it to keep it from cooling along its way such that the gases slow down and increases back pressure.

With such a short exhaust with two mufflers, not sure wrapping will help. Susptct if the waste gate is open, there is plenty of gasses to run the turbo without trying to retain heat. Only the dyno will tell.

Another reason to wrap an exhaust is to protect things near it from heat.

Coating or raping the header section might have more potential. That would insulate the primary tubes from the cooling air and the top end from radiant heat.

Just an unsolicited opinion, if that is not a cat right after the turbo, I would probably work to remove it. The section right after the turbo exit is suposed to be a bit more important.

Still, I think the wrap looks really cool.
Old 04-10-2013, 09:51 AM
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Thanks! I might wrap the headers as well. I want to see how much heat this eliminates first. It is not a cat after the turbo. It a four inch burns straight thru design. Only one muffler on the car
Old 04-10-2013, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 911st View Post
Coating or raping the header section might have more potential.
Just be sure to wait until the exhaust fully cools.
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Old 04-10-2013, 12:03 PM
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Lol will do.
Old 04-10-2013, 12:59 PM
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Two questions
Is the muffler/ tailpipe hung off the turbine housing?
Is the turbine housing material Stainless or Ni-Resist?
.........OK, just one more, are you seriously concerned about radiant heat while also just blasting out your two waste gates under the valance?
Old 04-10-2013, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strokher racing View Post
Sorry guys I have been on vacation. I forwarded them rarlyl8's concerns. Ptp responded right away saying the following

As you've suggested, the added heat in the turbocharger exhaust chamber, combined with the fact that this heat dissipates more slowly via natural convection with a turbo blanket installed, does make it more critical that a proper 'cool down ' process be instituted following every period of spirited driving. As you've indicated, there is a bit of a trade-off here. You get improved turbocharger performance and better engine bay heat protection with a turbo blanket, but you also have to be a little more responsible with the cool down process than you would with a factory setup. All turbocharger's cooling systems (either oil or oil and coolant) are designed to pull heat away from the turbocharger's bearings. The systems are designed to handle the dissipation of very high heat loads - much greater than your turbocharger would ever see, even with a turbo blanket. However, the cooling system is only effective while the engine is running.
(while the oil and/or coolant is circulating) The car's operator must allow the cooling system to do it's job to bring the turbocharger's temperature back down to normal levels after any period of aggressive driving. We recommend that you not shut off the engine directly after a hard run. We advise that you allow one to two minutes of cool down before killing the engine. You can either do this by waiting until that time has passed yourself or by installing a turbo timer. The real danger of heat in a turbocharger occurs when a very hot turbocharger is allowed to sit with no oil/coolant circulating. Heat soak occurs, causing the temperature of the turbo to actually rise for a period after the engine is turned off. When this happens, the oil in the turbocharger can heat to a point beyond what it's capable of handling. It can coke (cook and harden) and stick to the walls of the oil pathways in the turbo. This can eventually choke off the supply of oil to the turbo, preventing the cooling system from doing its job. Long enough periods without proper cooling can cause premature bearing failure in the turbocharger. All of this can be avoided by simply allowing a proper cool down after each period of spirited driving. We have seen absolutely no evidence that the usage of a turbo blanket reduces the lifespan of a turbocharger anywhere when the proper cool down process is instituted consistently."

Thanks a lot Edward, we have engineers and mechanics and very smart brains who work at PTP and we are glad to answer every concern that anyone might have.
PTP makes this product? What else would you expect them to say? Not sayin good or bad just sayin.....
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Old 04-10-2013, 01:32 PM
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The muffler and tailpipe was my heat issue. The wastegates did not cause heat issues for me

Old 04-10-2013, 02:43 PM
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