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Dr J's Avatar
 
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Another AEM EFI Conversion

I finally decided to upgrade my CIS to EFI. After adding a supercharger and using a DWUR (ultimately replaced by my Arduino controlled design) I found that the limitations of the hardware did not allow me to exploit the engines capabilities and it was time to move on.

Here is a post on that build: Another digital WUR project Arduino

I want to thank Chris at Turbokraft and Andrew at Rasant for talking to me and giving me enough info so as to select the components I did.

Timeline: I am trying to complete this in two months. My daughter is out for the summer on an internship so I am using her car and hope to have mine finished by the time she gets back.

EFI:
For the conversion I decided on using the AEM infinity system. I wanted to get as much of the items needed as possible from the same source so I went with Rasant Products.

Manifold:
I decided not to source a 3.2 manifold but to use the SC manifold with the injector adapters made by Rasant. Since my system is supercharged, I have a nice aluminum air box that I will reuse. I won't cut it, but will leave it as is. The 79 cars have the large port intake manifold so I'm set with that.

Ignition:
Since I already had a timing wheel on the crank pulley from an electromotive ignition system, I decided to get the Clewett Engineering cam sensor and go full sequential with the Rasant COP system.

Wiring:
Since the AEM has many inputs and outputs that can be used for additional sensors, I had a custom wiring harness made by Rasant so that I can get CAN signal, put other inputs and activate other outputs (always need to have future projects!)

Fueling:
For fueling I went with injector dynamics ID720 injectors- should provide sufficient fuel for the foreseeable future!

Sensors:
Already had a two-bar MAP sensor, so I'm adding to that an IAT, TPS, fuel pressure sensor and two knock sensors. I purchased the Porsche knock sensor bridge and will see how can I install it with the engine in the car.

Possible issues:
1) I recently was able to make my AC work and the compressor may interfere with the fuel rail.

2) On the other side of the engine the air return on the bypass valve may interfere with the fuel rail.

3) No load-bearing dyno that I know of (so far) in S Florida. This will make tuning harder though not impossible.

Pics to follow.
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1979 SC, Slant nose wide-body cab conversion. AEM Infinity EFI. Whipple Supercharged!

Last edited by Dr J; 06-18-2017 at 04:07 PM..
Old 06-18-2017, 03:48 PM
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Some of the goodies from Rasant:









Here is a picture of the engine right before starting the conversion:




The clock is ticking!
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1979 SC, Slant nose wide-body cab conversion. AEM Infinity EFI. Whipple Supercharged!
Old 06-18-2017, 04:03 PM
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That looks like one hell of a project! Good luck with everything!

On a side note, if the Porsche knock sensor bars end up not working out, I ended up installing a single knock sensor in this fashion:



Works well with the Infinity and no drilling required! You just need to make a spacer to replace the one you remove to install the knock sensor.

I used this sensor:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BHHYVHS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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1976 911S Signature Edition
3.2SSt (JE 98mm 9.5:1 pistons, 964 Cams, ARP Rod Bolts, Big Port SC Heads, 3.2 Carrera Manifold, ID725's, B&B Headers, Tial 44mm, TS RacePort, BW S360, AEM Infinity 506, E85)
Old 06-19-2017, 11:37 AM
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Thanks for the info on knock sensor location. If I run into difficulties mounting the knock bridges I will go with your suggestion.

I believe the knock sensors I have are the one you suggested.
Old 06-19-2017, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by '76 911S 3.0 View Post
That looks like one hell of a project! Good luck with everything!

On a side note, if the Porsche knock sensor bars end up not working out, I ended up installing a single knock sensor in this fashion:



Works well with the Infinity and no drilling required! You just need to make a spacer to replace the one you remove to install the knock sensor.

I used this sensor:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BHHYVHS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
That brilliant! I used the bridges and dual sensors by tapping the heads.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
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Old 06-19-2017, 08:40 PM
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This is where I install knock sensors too. I use a std Bosch sensor.
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Old 06-20-2017, 07:29 AM
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You are going to love the products you bought. I run the ID1000 injectors, and LOVE them! You get what you pay for!! Definitely, the best injectors out there.
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Brad...930 gt-1 racecar, increased displacement to 3.6L, JB racing Cylinders, JE 8 to1 pistons, stroked crank, Carrillo rods, extrudehoned 3.2L intake, full bay Bell I/C, GT-2 EVO cams, Rarly8 headers, GTX-35RS turbo, twin plug, P&P heads, Link G4 EFi system, G-50/50 with LTD slip and oil squirters/oil cooler, zork tube, full race coilover system, with carbon fiber body, full cage, E-85 sippin drunk
Old 06-20-2017, 08:12 AM
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Thanks! The ID are much more expensive, but if the pros use and recommend them I would rather spend the money than skimp there. They should also work for the forseeable future for me regardless of the power mods I have in mind.
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1979 SC, Slant nose wide-body cab conversion. AEM Infinity EFI. Whipple Supercharged!
Old 06-20-2017, 11:57 AM
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I am using ID725's on my engine, best injector you can get (ID's) IMHO
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1976 911S Signature Edition
3.2SSt (JE 98mm 9.5:1 pistons, 964 Cams, ARP Rod Bolts, Big Port SC Heads, 3.2 Carrera Manifold, ID725's, B&B Headers, Tial 44mm, TS RacePort, BW S360, AEM Infinity 506, E85)
Old 06-20-2017, 12:01 PM
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E-85 sippin drunk
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr J View Post
Thanks! The ID are much more expensive, but if the pros use and recommend them I would rather spend the money than skimp there. They should also work for the forseeable future for me regardless of the power mods I have in mind.
Yep, and there is a very good reason why they are more money. Their dead time info sheet is worth it alone. Not to mention their customer support is top notch. I had a fuel filter problem (mine was not filtering small enough) and I clogged a few injectors. I sent them back to Tony at T1, and they did a before and after cleaning test. One of them could not be saved and ended up selling me a matched injector at cost.

Trust me, after meeting Paul in person, and getting to know him, I will ONLY buy from them.
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Brad...930 gt-1 racecar, increased displacement to 3.6L, JB racing Cylinders, JE 8 to1 pistons, stroked crank, Carrillo rods, extrudehoned 3.2L intake, full bay Bell I/C, GT-2 EVO cams, Rarly8 headers, GTX-35RS turbo, twin plug, P&P heads, Link G4 EFi system, G-50/50 with LTD slip and oil squirters/oil cooler, zork tube, full race coilover system, with carbon fiber body, full cage, E-85 sippin drunk
Old 06-20-2017, 01:29 PM
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Turbobrat, where did you do
the extrudedhoned on your intake.
Would like to do it on my 3.3 turbo
intake.
Old 06-23-2017, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr J View Post
3) No load-bearing dyno that I know of (so far) in S Florida. This will make tuning harder though not impossible.
John... Could be one in Bird Rd. / Palmetto Xway area. Not sure if it's loaded. Will check on Monday and post status.
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Old 06-24-2017, 05:24 AM
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^^^ JS Benz has loaded dyno. 4501 SW 74 Ave, Miami FL 33155. Gio is guy to speak with concerning dyno. His cell: 305 926 0619. Owner of shop is JR--respectable guy from my experience.

Info and price reference: Performance – Jsbenz Miami
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Old 06-26-2017, 08:17 AM
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Thanks for the info on the dyno, Karl.

Here is another update.

Engine Bay Prep

First thing was to remove the supercharger. Also removed the electromotive wasted spark system as well as the DWUR, then came removal of the CIS.

The removal of the CIS was straightforward as I have done it many times. I forgot about the bracket behind the throttle body but quickly figured it out when it wouldn't budge.

I am using another set of intake pipes and I set up the passenger side to see if it interfered with the fuel rail, which it did. I purchased the injectors with the adapters to have the 60mm length but now have the option of removing the adapters and dropping to 48 mm length. So I did that, cut the fuel rail brackets to lower the rails and put a one inch spacer to raise the compressor adapter. The spacers were identified as a flat washer on the website but look like spacers.

https://m.lowes.com/pd/Hillman-Seamless-Steel-Spacer/3012320

After raising the compressor mount adapter and cutting a chunk off of the mount I was able to position the mount so that I could still tighten the serpentine belt by moving the compressor left/right but it wouldn't interfere with the compressor. The next question is whether or not the raised compressor interferes with the decklid. I can't answer yet due to a snafu with my decklid which caused me to remove it for now.

Damaged deck lid hinge?

In any event, if I have to cut the decklid, the cut falls within the space covered by the tail. I did have hopes at some point to be able to go tailless for a season but that may not be possible now.

CIS removed pic



Fitting of fuel rail bracket





Picture of the brackets cut and the fuel injectors with the hats removed:



With the compressor test done I was able to remove the compressor mount and remove the shroud, since I wanted to give it a thorough cleaning. I made one mistake in my first rebuild years ago: I mounted the breather cover gasket backwards. It was a pretty minor thing, but it allowed the engine to puke oil through there and the mess is history.

Dirty engine!



While I was at it, the engine bay wires were kind of crunchy and not in the best of shape. Also, there are all of these extra wires for the CIS auxiliary devices wirings cluttering things up. A quick call to Dennis (timmy2) and I ordered a new engine bay wiring harness sans CIS. Dennis quickly turned it around so I pulled the old wiring and am ready for the new, but first, to clean the top of the engine where the aforementioned oil was nicely spread by the fan.

Now I remember why I am so much slower than a mechanic. I can't just fix something, I have to make sure everything is as clean as I can get it. This makes every project take 2 to 3 times longer! Of course, I need to fix a few scratches on the shroud, add some paint to the compressor mount, etc. etc.

Clean bay ready for knock sensor bridge install.



The faithful wasted spark electromotive removed as I am going COP. The messy wires are relays and fuses for the AC condenser fans which were recently installed (the whole AC worthy of its own thread). These will be properly tidied up as a side job now that there is good access.



Here is the new engine bay wiring harness from timmy2 for everything not related to the EFI system.



Next is the installation of the cam sensor...
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1979 SC, Slant nose wide-body cab conversion. AEM Infinity EFI. Whipple Supercharged!

Last edited by Dr J; 06-26-2017 at 03:48 PM..
Old 06-26-2017, 03:44 PM
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I don't remember where in Peilcan, but I remember seeing that someone posted an adapter that goes from the engine to the oil pressure switch and has another output for an oil pressure sender to interface that can be used with the AEM to monitor oil pressure. Anyone have details on that adapter? Which is it and where to buy it? Now that I have easy access to that area, it may be the perfect opportunity to do it.
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Old 06-28-2017, 12:24 AM
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On the 964 cars they moved the sensors to the front of the engine and I think you can adapt some of those parts to add a sensor location.

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Old 06-28-2017, 07:14 AM
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Cam Sensor Installation

Thanks for the info on the 964. Still hoping someone has info on the adapters I'm looking for. Meanwhile.,,

Installation of cam sensor

I purchased the Clewett cam sensor and sent the electrical plug to Rasant to be incorporated into my wiring harness.

First step was to remove the exhaust manifold on the driver's side. Fortunately I had done this in the past and the nuts were easy to remove.

Now I have access to remove the engine tin in the back and pull it out.
Next comes the cleaning of all of the gunk.
Now to remove the cam plug. I called Clewett to find the recommended method for pulling it out. They suggested using a small dent puller. Later I found some old threads on how to do this.

I made a small hole about 1/2 inch from one edge. One of the posts in Pelican indicated there was only about 2 mm clearance between the cover and the cam. This is about right. So I ground the tip of the screw a little bit inserted it in the hole and used the weight to hammer until the puller came off. Then I ground the tip more and repeated until the screw in the puller got a good grip and then came out.





The camshaft has two holes in the end and, unfortunately, the way I had timed my camshaft caused one of the holes to be too close to where the bolt head that caused a signal on the sensor would be. After thinking about it for a while, I rotated the housing 120 degrees to a good spot on the cam, drilled and threaded the hole. Made sure the bolt head was the proper distance and buttoned it all up. Of course, the original Clewett instruction to install the sensor in a higher position is better, but I don't think the lower location I ended up with will be a problem.

Pic showing camshaft hole to close to the place where the screw was to be tapped.



Final position was 120 degrees CCW.



The procedure for getting 90 degrees BTDC is outlined here. (Note I did this a while ago but am catching up on the write up.)

MS3 Pro Conversion
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1979 SC, Slant nose wide-body cab conversion. AEM Infinity EFI. Whipple Supercharged!

Last edited by Dr J; 07-01-2017 at 01:20 AM..
Old 07-01-2017, 01:14 AM
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I'm a little behind on the write up (I have a deadline after all and have been out on too many trips!)

Here is the knock sensor work summary. With much appreciation for the input on knock sensors, I decided to continue with plan A of the knock sensor and keep the suggestions as plan B if I ran into any trouble. Fortunately, plan A worked.

I have received good suggestions on where to mount the knock sensors in this thread. I also read up on some old threads with recommended sensor locations. However, given how inexpensive the knock bridges were, I decided to use them.

The main problem was how to make the holes without removing the cylinder heads. Clewett says it can be done with an angle drill adapter so I went for it. The specific drill adapter I used was Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0002OMBJC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500336916&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=right+angle+drill+attachment+00101&dpPl=1&dpID=41kpMuzbZML&ref=plSrch

Originally I was going to get the snap on but they were taking too long.

https://store.snapon.com/90-Angle-Drill-Set-Kit-Angle-Drill-90-Blue-Point--P634533.aspx


It's nice that the kit has bits but I need a 5 mm (#9) bit to tap and thread the M6 bolt. I ordered one from:

https://drillsandcutters.com/search.php?q=tsd9s

First I ground flat the section of the cylinder where the bridge contacts the cylinder as there were raised numbers at that location in the cylinder. Then I drilled and tapped the holes. I mounted the knock sensors with no problem.

Picture of numbers that were ground off with dremel type tool.



For the bridge, the center to center distance of the bolt holes was 4.645". The lines at the center of the cylinders are pretty accurate indicators. The holes can be drilled 0.7 inch deep (I wouldn't drill deeper than 0.8"). The tap is 6mm-1.0. At 0.7" depth you should not need an end tap. The holes can be made 0.475" from the bottom of the cylinder wall, measured next to the heads. Too low and you would need a thinner angle drill to drill a horizontal hole. You can drill higher without fear of interference with the shroud. I took the drill hole guide provided by Clewett for the install of the cam sensor. I ground the edge to get the proper height for the hole. I pushed the spacer against the head to keep the drill as perpendicular to the head as possible.

Here is a picture of the angle drill adapter and the drill




This is a picture tapping the head.




Here are pictures of the finished product!






The part numbers are:
993 104 391 00 for the knock bridge (2 needed)
900 075 51801 knock sensor bolt (M8 x 30 mm) (2 needed)
900 074 015 02 knock bridge bolts (M6 x 30 mm) (6 needed)
N 011 524 27 knock bridge bolt washers (6 needed)
O 261 231 006 for the Bosch knock sensor itself

The torque spec was obtained from 993 torque specs (valid 1993-1998)

M6 bolts tightened to 7 ft-lbs
Knock sensor bolt to 15+- 4 ft-lbs

Two holes were made in the shroud with grommets to allow the wiring to pass through. I drilled two 1-1/8 in holes on the shroud near the knock sensors and used a large grommet which I slit to allow the wire to go through. This first grommet was large to cover the hole but also had a large center hole. I then used a smaller grommet, more like a rubber stopper to seal the center hole with the wire in the middle. This completing the knock sensor part of the project.

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Old 08-03-2017, 01:11 PM
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Manifold and sensors installation

I decided to use my aluminum air box , but did not want to cut up the fuel distributor section since this air box is rare. Instead, I put a flat sheet of steel in the location where the fuel distributor would have gone to cover the hole and serve as a mounting surface. I used the plate to mount the MAP, FPR, and IACV.

After scratching my head for a while on how to route the IACV, it occurred to me that I already had the right size piping from the CIS AAR system. Using the old Auxiliary Air Regulator adaptor and piping, I cut it up to connect the IACV back through the adapter for the Cold Start Valve and sealed the Cold Start Valve hole. I just had to cut it up and put the pieces in the correct angles. This worked out well.

While in hindsight I could have mounted the FPR near the top center of the engine bay, I used aluminum angle to mount it on the plate, near the throttle body. I also mounted the MAP sensor using the same aluminum angle. The advantage is that the wiring harness has all of these connectors near the same spot so it worked out well.

Here are pictures of the IACV, MAP, and FPR install.






For normally aspirated, I will put a small filter at inlet to the IACV. When I go back to supercharged, I will put a check valve there as well.

I had to source another throttle body because the rod on the SC throttle body does not extend beyond the body so I could not mount the TPS. I added the Rasant spacer and TPS. After some mods, I got everything in place.

The last question was checking the interference between the supercharger and the fuel rail. I ended up cutting the height of the fuel rail just like on the other side. I will have to reroute the supercharger bypass after sealing the old bypass return at the supercharger to avoid the interference.

The plan is to start playing with the AEM while NA and later add the boost back again.
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Old 08-05-2017, 04:26 PM
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Down the home stretch:

Now installed the alternator, cleaned up the AC wiring, plugged in all the sensors and installed the COP. For the COP to fit you need NGK plugs so out came the Bosch ones. Finally, I installed the AC compressor with the spacers, which worked great, and was ready for startup.

Here is the final product.



Initial startup:

Now it was time to program the ECU. i have a problem that currently has me stumped. I pulled the #1 coil and can't get a spark out of it. I used the Clewett "newer" style 60-2 crank pulley with 1/2 inch magnetic sensor that worked on the Electromotive HPX wasted spark system. In the diagnostic page I get good crank angle but the start% probability remains at 0%. What determines start probability? Here is a picture of my screen.

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Old 08-09-2017, 05:08 PM
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