Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > 911 Engine Rebuilding Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 9,779
Garage
Basement activities........

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dauner View Post
Hi Tony and everyone. Got everything moved from the garage to my basement workshop. Was easier than I had imagined to get it thru the door on the stand.

Thanks for the advice!

Mark


Mark,

Place some cardboard pieces under those engine stand wheels to prevent scuffing the hardwood floor. Moving the engine stand sideways from time to time would tend to rub against the flooring. Prudence dictates to do some preventive measures than regret later. Good luck with the rebuild.

Tony

Old 12-23-2019, 10:21 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Walt Fricke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Posts: 5,699
Tony - Archimedes, here I come. What a winch setup.

All - note that Porsche didn't use any sealant on the copper gasket/cylinder/case joint. Think of banjo crush washers for fluids under pressure, too - no sealant. I've noticed there tends to be a bit of grime attached to the outside of this cylinder joint, though. My suspicion is that a tiny bit of oil can weep there, but not enough to worry about. Of course, if sealing surfaces are compromised, or like me you tend to reuse some parts others recommend always replacing, a sealant would make more sense. The good thing is that with a non-hardening sealant there really is no downside other than a bit of labor and a miniscule cost. The downside of using a curing sealant is that it makes disassembly a lot harder, and I expect that prying the copper gasket off of one or the other of the surfaces might have risks of scratching something, and gasket damage if you planned to reuse it.

The standard take on gasket sealants used to be "don't." I think this was based mainly on 6 stud exhaust valve covers on the early motors. The gaskets stretched a fair distance between the studs, and lubricating them with some sticky sealant allowed the gasket more opportunity to shift. This really isn't the case much any more, though I don't use a sealant for valve covers. Case to chain box is different, including the cam gasket.
Old 12-25-2019, 01:23 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #22 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: St Paul MN
Posts: 3,018
Garage
Mark,

Iím in St Paul if you need an extra hand moving the engine after you have more parts on it. I also have most of the Stomski engine building tools if you would like to use them.

Rutager
__________________
Rutager West

1977 911S Targa Chocolate Brown
Old 12-25-2019, 04:19 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #23 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 2
if I do put Loctite 574 or Curil T on base gaskets, can I drop the cylinders down and have light pressure on them xender discord omegle without the curing starting, or do I need to leave gap without gaskets touching case or cylinders? I assume I want to have the 1184 application be the last thing I do before putting the carrier on and starting the race against time to get all washers/nuts started, initial torque, and then final torque?

Last edited by kamyle ben; 12-28-2019 at 12:58 PM..
Old 12-26-2019, 11:30 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #24 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Hudson, WI
Posts: 176
Garage
Hi Rutager,

I'll almost certainly be taking you up on your offer to help move the engine back up to the garage! Knowing I got it thru the 30" door on the stand implies i can get it the other way as well (cylinders up down). Going to be a lot heavier though!

Thanks,

Mark
__________________
1989 911 Carrera 3.2
2009 Audi A4 2.0TQA
2006 Subaru Forester
1971 BMW R60/5
Old 12-27-2019, 06:37 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #25 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: St Paul MN
Posts: 3,018
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dauner View Post
Hi Rutager,

I'll almost certainly be taking you up on your offer to help move the engine back up to the garage! Knowing I got it thru the 30" door on the stand implies i can get it the other way as well (cylinders up down). Going to be a lot heavier though!

Thanks,

Mark
Send me a PM when youíre ready. What goes down, must come up?

It will be so much nicer working on it in a heated basement.
__________________
Rutager West

1977 911S Targa Chocolate Brown
Old 12-27-2019, 01:34 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #26 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
Walt Fricke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Posts: 5,699
Kamyle - use Curil and don't worry about any of this. You (and others) are overthinking this. Remember, Porsche didn't use any sealant there. Absent some very unusual defect (which should be very visible), you'll never get a leak large enough to worry about from this joint. Yes, we all hate to see any smudge of oil on our engines, but it is the frequent drips on the garage floor or on a hot exhaust pipe with smoke which is more than a minor inconvenience with a rag occasionally while we are under the car for some other reason. You won't get those drips from these cylinder joints.

The more likely source of a bothersome leak is the case through bolt and its squishy little O rings, some of which have oil under full pressure behind them. You are probably past that in the reassembly process, but if not, that's where to concentrate your energies.

As long as you are careful to have everything ready to go - hardware cleaned and sorted, and a time when nothing will interrupt you - the curing time of the Loctite or other curing sealants isn't really going to be a problem. Yes, lots of fasteners when putting the case together, but with an engine stand you just get on it and it is done in plenty of time. Same with the cam carriers to the heads. Get them all on and snugged, start torqueing, and you are there.

I'd pay more attention to being sure I remember to insert the oil return tubes before I put the carrier on the heads (having some two piece ones handy is useful in case you forget) than to the curing time.

Old 12-28-2019, 12:49 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #27 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:30 PM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2020 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.