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smooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
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I have removed mine thru the interior hatch for inspection/cleaning. Removed the electrical connector bracket in front of it for more access. It's tight but not too bad of a project. It's just a pressure valve with free flowing vacuum from the crankcase but I guess if it's gunked up enough it could cause problems.
Old 04-19-2013, 08:13 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
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I just changed this and thought I'd add some help to others.

Yes, you have to take off the cover behind the seats, and I pulled out that electrical connection in front of it too. I was able to use two long 1/4" extensions to come in from the top, while looking from the side to loosen the bolt. Once it was fully loose, I used one of those long reach spring finger grabbing thing to grab the bolt and pull it out without losing it.

I used a small screwdriver to pop the valve up and out. I pushed the valve and hose backwards. Then from under the car (with the car up on ramps), I was able to pull the hose down and swap the valves. I pushed it back up.

It was a little difficult to rotate it around to line it up. But, I succeeded.

I then used a small mirror and small screwdriver to move the valve into position and down into the hole.

I put the bolt back into the valve using the springy grabber thing. I then got the socket on the end of the long extensions and was able to lightly turn the bolt.

I think I had a LOT of luck that the threads lined up and I was able to thread it down without crossing the threads. But I did turn very slowly with light finger pressure to get it started.

We'll see if it allows my air oil separator to last longer. This is my second replacement.

A shop did it the first time.

By the way, elsewhere, on Pelican it says there are two of them. I could not find a second one.
Old 09-07-2013, 10:17 PM
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No expert but have replaced mine twice in 90k. That soon sound like either really bad luck or super excessive blow by/ crank case pressures from bad rings. Maybe a compression or leak down test would eliminate that. I would suspect you would be smoking quite bit if it were that bad even with a new AOS. Oh much easier to access with the axel out but I just got lucky on that one.
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Old 09-08-2013, 05:33 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #23 (permalink)
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This issue is covered including part number references to Pelican and part numbers here:
anyone ever replace the PCV valve? - 986 Forum - for Porsche Boxster Owners and Others
It would make a great DIY subject because it is soooo tedious.And if you drop the little bolt or cross-thread it !
I suggest replacing the original bolt with one that has a chamfered lead/nose and an internal hex drive so you can use a little weak adhesive or electrical tape.
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Last edited by Scnell Gelb; 11-08-2017 at 09:13 AM..
Old 11-08-2017, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne 962 View Post
It's pretty straightforward, but access is not that great. Just be sure you jack up the car enough, and use backup jack stands.

-Wayne
The AOS is one of the last of many things I'm doing to service my '01 Boxster base. I started poking around with the engine cover off yesterday afternoon. You say it's easier to change the AOS from beneath the car. Are you removing the transmission guard?

I have "normal" size arms but they aren't triple jointed. The biggest problem I'm having is squeezing the lower hose connector so that I can pull it free from the AOS.

Also, I've never seen any mention of trying to clean the flex hose between the AOS and throttle body? It seems to me this should be a priority if you are cleaning your throttle body, since that is the main path contaminates follow.

Thanks for all of the hard work putting together the book and How to Articles.

Jim
Old 11-22-2017, 06:53 AM
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Any links to an AOS rebuild? Ive seen some ads offering a single membrane at a cost of less than $10, and picked up a used AOS as well, so curious as to a writeup for this?
Old 02-22-2018, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pelsteve1 View Post
Any links to an AOS rebuild? Ive seen some ads offering a single membrane at a cost of less than $10, and picked up a used AOS as well, so curious as to a writeup for this?
Complete waste of time. The AOS was not designed to be disassembled, and the aftermarket diaphragms are of unknown quality or longevity.
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Old 02-23-2018, 07:14 AM
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I did the whole thing this week. Changed AOS, crank case vent valve and upper and lower vent hoses. Changing the AOS, vent valve and upper hose was not terrible. The lower vent hose was a nightmare. Mine was cracked and broken. I detached the old one from the vent valve and the AOS.. removed the old AOS and vent valve. Removed the throttle body and two cross tubes ( I have a 3.2). I cut the old lower vent hose in half and pulled it out. The stock pipe is pretty stiff plastic. I considered doing a work around with 3/4Ē PCV hose. Unlike other hose, PCV has reinforced walls that wonít compress under vacuum. I was going to use the end of the stock hose and attach them with clamps. I decided to give one good try with the new stock vent pipe first. I also detached the oil filler neck from the block so I could snake the new vent line in. It took 2 days to get it in. I did the drivers side first. It is very difficult. You have to force it in under the plenum. Itís very stiff and has a bend. It can be done but itís very difficult. A lot of force and swearing is needed. Once that side is in you have to bend the plastic pipe in order to get the other side in. The new pipe is stiff but will bend with force. The passenger side has more flex and you can get it in. I strongly suggest taking a picture of everything before you take the old hose out so you can see exactly how it snakes through. It was the most frustrating work I have ever done on the car. I wonít do it again. If I had to, I would use PCV hose. The stock pipe is trash. During the process I replaced my vacuum lines, they are right there and mine were bad. Also cleaned the throttle body since it was off.
Old 02-24-2018, 02:18 AM
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No need to roll the dice on this one. Use Genuine Porsche only. The aftermarket ones are pure junk. If you track your car, put a motorsports one on and make sure you run your oil level on the min. mark. Overfilling is the fastest way to kill your AOS (and engine). Here is an article on the AOS and PCV system:

Tech Tuesday: Understanding the PCV System and AOS - by Tony Callas
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Old 02-24-2018, 06:15 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #29 (permalink)
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