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A930Rocket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masraum View Post
Perusing Facebook marketplace, and for most of the tools for sale, I can't help but thing that what I'm looking at is mostly junk or stolen.
When I look at Craigslist, why are so many tools new in the box? Screams stolen to me.

Old 11-29-2020, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A930Rocket View Post
When I look at Craigslist, why are so many tools new in the box? Screams stolen to me.
Exactly, a bunch of Dewalt stuff that's NIB. Hell no.

I did see one that was a picture of a garage full of stuff. Father in law passed away and they were getting rid of stuff. Looked legit, like someone had been using the garage, not just a bunch of stuff stacked in it. Otherwise, a lot of the stuff looks like it could easily have been stolen out of trucks, garages or jobsites.
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'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
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'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-29-2020, 08:45 PM
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More Woodworkers (mostly) tool porn!

https://www.jimbodetools.com/collections/whats-new
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-30-2020, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAtarga View Post
That is why the card scraper does such a good job. It is basically replicating a plane blade at close to a 70-80į bevel (or higher). They are relatively easy to sharpen as well.
Here's the first video I looked at as an example:

I still had the tab up with this video and accidentally clicked on it again. It automatically started to play right when he said "this hook right here ,will grab your wood and peel it like a shaving..."

I must be in just the right mood because I thought "ouch!"
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-03-2020, 10:47 AM
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I've watched several "router" videos. When I've used a router in the past, I eventually figured out the correct way to run the router (against the spin). But based on the videos, I was clearly cutting too much with each cut. I've seen a guideline to only cut half of the size of your collet in one pass. Since my old router was 1/4" collet, I should have stuck to 1/8" cuts. I feel certain that I've done cuts that should have been 2-3 passes in a single pass, and probably even worse when using the router to create a dado groove.

Things that make you go "hmmmm."
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
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'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-03-2020, 12:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masraum View Post
I've watched several "router" videos. When I've used a router in the past, I eventually figured out the correct way to run the router (against the spin). But based on the videos, I was clearly cutting too much with each cut. I've seen a guideline to only cut half of the size of your collet in one pass. Since my old router was 1/4" collet, I should have stuck to 1/8" cuts. I feel certain that I've done cuts that should have been 2-3 passes in a single pass, and probably even worse when using the router to create a dado groove.

Things that make you go "hmmmm."
IMO dados should be cut with one pass for consistency. For cabinets making, simple dados are normally 1/4" deep, so no real stress on even slightly under powered routers with 1/4 shank. If you are buying new routers, get a 1.5 hp. If possible a D handle for production work. A bit more bulky to handle but much easier for cutting dados and other normal use. I also prefer the flat top ones like the Porter Cable 690. That thing is such workhorse. It allows the router to stand up side down for bit change.
Old 12-03-2020, 01:27 PM
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Lots of good info there, thanks. The flat top making bit changes easier is a good call.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-03-2020, 01:51 PM
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When we downsized, I gave the daughter (married with a home) first dibs on all of the tools that I was getting rid of. They took some stuff. We were there today and they gave back the dewalt reciprocating saw and the Ryobi circular saw. Neither is an expensive item, but they're both adequate, so that saves me spending a few hundred dollars. She also had the nice industrial power strip that I had so that's another plus.

I think the big expenditures are going to be the sawstop table saw, and then the miter saw, although I'll probably get the Dewalt DWS-779 which is the discontinued 12" sliding that's only $349, so that's not going to be that expensive.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-06-2020, 07:12 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #188 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masraum View Post
When we downsized, I gave the daughter (married with a home) first dibs on all of the tools that I was getting rid of. They took some stuff. We were there today and they gave back the dewalt reciprocating saw and the Ryobi circular saw. Neither is an expensive item, but they're both adequate, so that saves me spending a few hundred dollars. She also had the nice industrial power strip that I had so that's another plus.

I think the big expenditures are going to be the sawstop table saw, and then the miter saw, although I'll probably get the Dewalt DWS-779 which is the discontinued 12" sliding that's only $349, so that's not going to be that expensive.
Miters can be cut on the table saw with a simple jig very accurately. Lots of guys like that, but I don't. Spend a couple hours on that jig and save until you really need the sliding mitersaw.
Old 12-06-2020, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
Miters can be cut on the table saw with a simple jig very accurately. Lots of guys like that, but I don't. Spend a couple hours on that jig and save until you really need the sliding mitersaw.
OK, cool.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-06-2020, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
Miters can be cut on the table saw with a simple jig very accurately. Lots of guys like that, but I don't. Spend a couple hours on that jig and save until you really need the sliding mitersaw.
So what would you need a miter saw for if you can do the cuts on a table saw using a jig? The only thing that I can think of is cutting REALLY long material, like you would use for crown moulding or baseboards. Is that it?
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-06-2020, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by masraum View Post
So what would you need a miter saw for if you can do the cuts on a table saw using a jig? The only thing that I can think of is cutting REALLY long material, like you would use for crown moulding or baseboards. Is that it?
I hate using that jig, but some people swear by it, old timers who likes the accuracy, not that you can't produce the same cut on a chop saw. Its just easier on the table saw but for long length, I rather cut that on the chop saw with supports of course. Table saw isn't portable. Lets say that you have to cue bases and case in the upstairs room. A chop was is king for that kind of work unless you like the exercise running back and forth to the shop? I am talking about a cabinet size table saw, not a job site one. I wouldn't cut too much miters with the job site little saw with a jig. Not too safe unless you have all kinds of outfeed and extensions.
Old 12-06-2020, 10:33 PM
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I think for you, on a restoration, a chop was and a table saw is a must. Set up that chop saw with extensions in the shop with stops for accurate repeated cuts. Pull it if you need it in the house nailing molding.
Old 12-06-2020, 10:34 PM
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I can’t think of any miter joint that you would ordinarily need to cut on a house remodeling project that doesn’t involve a long piece of stock. 99% involves a molding. So, I can’t think of any that you would want to cut on a tablesaw.

For my money, that shop is too far from the house to be really useful on your project. That may be the only practical place to put a tablesaw but the miter saw would need to be in the house or right next to it, to be practical.
Old 12-07-2020, 02:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
I hate using that jig, but some people swear by it, old timers who likes the accuracy, not that you can't produce the same cut on a chop saw. Its just easier on the table saw but for long length, I rather cut that on the chop saw with supports of course. Table saw isn't portable. Lets say that you have to cue bases and case in the upstairs room. A chop was is king for that kind of work unless you like the exercise running back and forth to the shop? I am talking about a cabinet size table saw, not a job site one. I wouldn't cut too much miters with the job site little saw with a jig. Not too safe unless you have all kinds of outfeed and extensions.
In watching some of the videos on youtube, I've seen some great jigs for table saws. I'll certainly be giving them a shot. Obviously, for crosscuts on anything long, the miter saw would be the way to go.

This is what I'm currently targeting (and CFO has approved). It's got the 36" extended side table. The next step up is 52". I probably won't go that route.
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'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
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'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-07-2020, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by javadog View Post
I canít think of any miter joint that you would ordinarily need to cut on a house remodeling project that doesnít involve a long piece of stock. 99% involves a molding. So, I canít think of any that you would want to cut on a tablesaw.

For my money, that shop is too far from the house to be really useful on your project. That may be the only practical place to put a tablesaw but the miter saw would need to be in the house or right next to it, to be practical.
I don't think there's any way in hell the missus would let me bring the saw into the house. I could maybe manage outside, but I could probably manage the walk back and forth.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
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Old 12-07-2020, 06:52 AM
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I was very happy when I discovered these before.

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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
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Old 12-07-2020, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by javadog View Post
I canít think of any miter joint that you would ordinarily need to cut on a house remodeling project that doesnít involve a long piece of stock. 99% involves a molding. So, I canít think of any that you would want to cut on a tablesaw.

For my money, that shop is too far from the house to be really useful on your project. That may be the only practical place to put a tablesaw but the miter saw would need to be in the house or right next to it, to be practical.
I don't think we'll be doing any baseboards or crown moulding, but then who knows. I could end up needing to cut door and/or window casing.
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'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 12-07-2020, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by masraum View Post
I don't think there's any way in hell the missus would let me bring the saw into the house. I could maybe manage outside, but I could probably manage the walk back and forth.
It's no big deal. I remodeled my last house over a 7 year period. I gutted it down to the structure and replaced some of that, as well. You work on one room or one area at a time and cordon off the rest to contain the mess. Our first 6 months in the house, we didn't even have a proper master bedroom.

From my memory, this is a second house for you, so no need to completely move in first and then try to live there. Complete the big projects first, then move in as you have completed rooms or areas. Don't make it harder on yourselves.

If you do any new sheetrock, as you have suggested you will, you'll at least be redoing the door, window and cased opening trims. No way you want to walk all the way to the "shop" every time you make a cut.

My advice is to get the house knocked out first, then entertain your "shop" and "woodworking" fantasies on weekends, way down the road.
Old 12-07-2020, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by masraum View Post
In watching some of the videos on youtube, I've seen some great jigs for table saws. I'll certainly be giving them a shot. Obviously, for crosscuts on anything long, the miter saw would be the way to go.

This is what I'm currently targeting (and CFO has approved). It's got the 36" extended side table. The next step up is 52". I probably won't go that route.
I don't think you will be dissapointed!

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Old 12-07-2020, 08:43 AM
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