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Forgot to add. If the tops are three pieces, have a solid one piece counter (the piece that has the nosing) connect all the uppers, screw them right into the bottoms of the sides. Attach back to stiffen them.

Old 12-19-2020, 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
Yep. Build the lower and upper sections separately, connect them at location. If all lower are the same height, connect them up first then put uppers on top of it. Here's a simple ugly and simple drawing showing the nosing that will hide all seams making it look like if the whole thing is one piece.
Very good idea to hide the seams. Thanks. That is the sort of trick that one needs to know.
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Old 12-19-2020, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Nostril Cheese View Post
Cool beans, do you cut your own inlays cnc?? Jewelers saw ?? I picked up a 12 quarter 14ft by 16 wide stick of Honduran mahogany out of this old cabinet shop in Utica NY last year. Stuff is getting pretty rare these days.
Anyway nice work keep it up.
Old 12-19-2020, 07:28 AM
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A couple of maple tops Iíve been saving for a rainy day.
Old 12-19-2020, 07:35 AM
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Old 12-19-2020, 07:36 AM
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Come up with a design or dimension, I will try and help all the gotchas before you start building.
Old 12-19-2020, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
Come up with a design or dimension, I will try and help all the gotchas before you start building.
Okay, thanks. This may take awhile. Please stand by.
Side question.. Can a circular saw with a track system cut the plywood accurate/straight enough or do I definitely need to use a table saw?
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Old 12-19-2020, 08:33 AM
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Okay, thanks. This may take awhile. Please stand by.
Side question.. Can a circular saw with a track system cut the plywood accurate/straight enough or do I definitely need to use a table saw?
Info.
I'm replacing a three piece set that needs a wider unit in the center to accommodate a 65" TV. The current set consists of three units (center 42" and two at 36"). Each on 4 bun feet. The overall width with 2" or so gaps is 10 feet. I'm thinking the new center piece needs to be 69" wide. The two "side" units would then need to be 23" wide. The center unit is 24" deep and the side units are 20" deep. The new center section can be 7' high if I'm going to have a "hood" over the TV. It could be that the center section will end up being just a cabinet with a top at about 40" high. That would save needing to build the "hood". I can then attach the TV to the wall.
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Old 12-19-2020, 08:59 AM
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Okay - here is a picture of the idea. I would want the TV higher and have a shelf that slides out to get to the back of electrical components and a shelf right under the TV for a sound bar. You can also see Shara Woodshop Diaries. She builds a large entertainment center. Thanks for helping out. My question to wood workers is probably like posting how to check oil level on a 911.

The picture shows a design that seems too "fancy" for what I need. I'm thinking a straight forward cabinet with a light color wood grain finish.
I was thinking the middle cabinet (main cabinet) could be made in two pieces so it is not too big to get easily into the house.

Here is a picture of a DIY design I think I could handle. The dimensions are approximately what I'm going for.



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Old 12-19-2020, 02:20 PM
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69" and 23 sides looks funny, off balance? How much room do you have there? How about making it a true build-in instead of free standing. It doesn't cost any more or less.

Here's what I would do, have the TV mounted on a 3/4" plywood backing of the cabinet instead of the wall. It looks better that way instead of looking at a giant painted wall color hole. 24" deep is the past unless you need the deep storage space? Reduce the depth and build the the entire unit 14-16" deep. It normally more then enough depth for modern stereo, or theater electronics. Cut holes on backing from down below where the receiver lives, fish wires to holes in back of TV. No wires will show or seen. Mount to on bracket so it can be pulled out toward the front to eliminate the feeling of it sitting under a hood. When done, push back toward wall, for looks. If you must have steps between center and side cabinets, the side can then be 12" to create that step look. Save some frontal space too by going to a less deep cabinet. Run that all the way up to ceiling and use crown or flat molding to hide gap. Paint or stain to finish.
Old 12-19-2020, 02:26 PM
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What's the style of the rest of the house?

This is very typical of people because that's what they see in furniture stores, the many steps. Some people like that? Most of the TV type cabinets we built our of the shop has been straight even with complex molding to match a certain older style of homes.
Old 12-19-2020, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Dpmulvan View Post
A couple of maple tops Iíve been saving for a rainy day.
Very cool...

I've been working on this one for a while now...

As for inlays, I use small chisels.



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Old 12-19-2020, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
What's the style of the rest of the house?

This is very typical of people because that's what they see in furniture stores, the many steps. Some people like that? Most of the TV type cabinets we built our of the shop has been straight even with complex molding to match a certain older style of homes.
Look 171, I sent you a PM.
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Old 12-20-2020, 04:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hcoles View Post
Okay, thanks. This may take awhile. Please stand by.
Side question.. Can a circular saw with a track system cut the plywood accurate/straight enough or do I definitely need to use a table saw?
Table saws are great if they are large and heavy. I'm talking cabinet saws over your typical DeWalt jobsite machine.

So and yes, a decent track saw with a quality blade is way more than 'good enough'.

And since you are manipulating the saw instead of awkward sheets of plywood, the accuracy is often better unless you have lots of feeder and outfeed support (that takes up a LOT of room). Really, it takes 2 people to do a full sheet on a TS w/o the extensions.

Last sheet I did on the TS I used my wife and roller stands to make it work and I still had to back up the cut once to get back tight to the fence. Since I always cut a bit oversize I was able to trim that piece to perfect.
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Old 12-20-2020, 09:21 AM
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The advantage of a table saw over a track saw is its ability to rip long pieces of wood to narrower widths.

I wouldn't build any sort of cabinet without a table saw.
Old 12-20-2020, 10:12 AM
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Track saws are good for a couple cuts, accurately. Nothing beats a table saw fence for repeated accurate cuts. Panel saw, is another tool I like for that task. Too much human error at play with the track saw.
Old 12-20-2020, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Nostril Cheese View Post
Very cool...

I've been working on this one for a while now...

As for inlays, I use small chisels.



Nice
Old 12-21-2020, 04:30 AM
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Track saws are good for a couple cuts, accurately. Nothing beats a table saw fence for repeated accurate cuts. Panel saw, is another tool I like for that task. Too much human error at play with the track saw.
When I get to that point I'll probably attempt use some sort of track and the proper blade, with more input from people here. I just don't have the room to own more floor-space consuming equipment. I have two cars in a two car garage. Maybe I'll practice on a few pieces to see how straight they come out. Another option is to try and find someplace that can do the critical cuts for me. I'll try to adjust my design so that 100% perfect cuts are not required for acceptable results. If the results come out e.g. a grade of B+, or better, then I've probably done okay and can keep my amateur DIY card in good standing.
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Old 12-23-2020, 06:26 AM
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You can make straight cuts with a Skil saw, a long straight edge and a couple clamps.

But, that’s no way to build a cabinet. You’re not gonna build a cabinet like what you pictured above without a tablesaw and some other tools.

You can buy them for the duration of the project and then sell them when you’re done, a thousand bucks spent on used equipment would be enough to get you going. You can get your money back after you are finished, that stuff sells pretty well.

If you don’t have the room for the tools, even temporarily, then you don’t have the room for building a cabinet that size either. That’s OK, just go buy one at a furniture store, or have a cabinet shop build you one.
Old 12-23-2020, 06:34 AM
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One can make accurate cuts with a track saw good enough for cabinets. In the pre Great Depression days carpenters built cabinets (often on site) with a hand saw.

You can also use a hand plane on the edges of good plywood.

I did a video on my YT channel about installing a mortise lockset with only hand tools just to show how it was back then. With modern tools I used to do 30 2-1/8th" style in an 8 hour day. I think 8-10 a day would have been the goal in the early days.

That's what modern tools do, make it easier and quicker. Not necessarily better.

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Old 12-23-2020, 07:08 AM
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