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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
dull bit often make the router chatter so will taking too big a bite. maybe the router isn't powerful enough? 1 hp or 1.25 is prefect.
That seems most likely. It'n an ancient router, I thought B&D, but based on pics that I could find online, I think probably Stanley.

From memory, it looks like this.

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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-19-2020, 07:12 PM
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That's a good router. The typical Stanley industrial from the 70s. Maybe 1hp but only 1/4' shank. Keep that. Its a good tool
Old 11-19-2020, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
That's a good router. The typical Stanley industrial from the 70s. Maybe 1hp but only 1/4' shank. Keep that. Its a good tool
Yeah, I don't have a lot from my grandpa, but I have that, which is why I've kept it.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-19-2020, 07:17 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #143 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by masraum View Post
Yeah, I don't have a lot from my grandpa, but I have that, which is why I've kept it.
That became the Bosch router. If you look at the newer Bosch base and handle, its the exactly same thing. I have a couple of them so parts are still available
Old 11-19-2020, 07:53 PM
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LWJ LWJ is offline
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You can cut a piece off a handsaw and make a card scraper out of it. Hand saws are cheap and plentiful used. Bonus? Keep the teeth. You can use that side to spread mastic or clean out a groove.

Did anyone mention PPE? My first house was built in 1914. Lots of toxic crap in that house.
Old 11-19-2020, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
That became the Bosch router. If you look at the newer Bosch base and handle, its the exactly same thing. I have a couple of them so parts are still available
Cool. He was 60 when I was born. My dad was from a second marriage. He was born in 1910 so was a young man through the depression. He passed away while I was in college and we traveled (dad in the Navy) when I was younger, so I didn't really get to know him as an adult. Due to living through the depression, I'm sure he didn't spend needlessly, but I suspect he also bought quality when he did spend money.
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'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-20-2020, 06:30 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #146 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LWJ View Post
You can cut a piece off a handsaw and make a card scraper out of it. Hand saws are cheap and plentiful used. Bonus? Keep the teeth. You can use that side to spread mastic or clean out a groove.

Did anyone mention PPE? My first house was built in 1914. Lots of toxic crap in that house.
I don't think that's come up. In the past, I usually used something like this.



And for protective eyewear, I prefer goggles that seal around the sides so stuff doesn't bounce/fling behind them.

Fortunately, this house was worked on in the past, so I'm not sure that there's probably too much bad stuff in it other, maybe, than some lead paint, which I'm not sure about.

That's cool about the card scraper. If I find or stumble across an old saw, I may make one. I may not end up using it all of the time, but it would be satisfying to know about them and have some experience using them and have one just in case.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten

Last edited by masraum; 11-20-2020 at 07:36 AM..
Old 11-20-2020, 07:06 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #147 (permalink)
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I've spoken to the missus about the sawstop and showed her the video of how they work. She's supportive of the extra expenditure.

I have some questions:

1 Do you think it's worth it to get the contractor's saw over the jobsite saw? I'm thinking probably "yes" based on my experience with my old jobsite saw.

vs


2 Is the "cast iron wings" upgrade worth it over the standard stamped steel? ($270)


3 There's also a '36" T-glide' option which gives you more table on the right with legs and what looks like an upgraded fence ($200) The standard fence looks like what was on my old saw, and I hated that thing.


Or would I be fine to just go with the base model, and then upgrade the fence?

There's also a $200 option to add wheels.


4 Add the Dado option (dado cartridge and throat plate and blade stack), or just use a router for that sort of thing?
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten

Last edited by masraum; 11-20-2020 at 06:44 PM..
Old 11-20-2020, 06:25 PM
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LWJ LWJ is offline
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Saw stop HQ is just down the street last I checked. If they have a company store or similar give me a PM maybe we can make something happen.
Old 11-20-2020, 07:16 PM
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If you've got a "permanent" location for the shop - I'd say go ahead and get the contractor model saw.
Routers can be used for the dado options when needed for the most part. However, if you're into making box joints for drawers and boxes - the dado stack on the table saw would be MUCH more accurate.

Here's my Sawstop setup that replaced my Delta saw. The table structure behind it was then modified to fit the larger Sawstop footprint, so I've got a full 8' by 8' work surface including the saw table. This is the 52" version cabinet model. Dust collection and power to the saw are in a trough you see to the right of the cabinet.
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Old 11-20-2020, 07:41 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #150 (permalink)
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Me, I get the cabinet saw if not, the contractor's saw at the very least. Job site saw would by my only saw that rides in back of a pick up truck to cut trims and scribe. Cast iron wings are great and solid, the stamp steels will work but feels flimsy. I can't say this enough to anyone that has limited space and needs to mover the saw around. Pay for a HTC mobile base. They are heavy dty and once locked, do not move even if you have to rip a 4x8, 3/4 plywood. Its worth the additional safety. Nothing like having a saw move on you when ripping a full sheet on the saw. Get the mobile base that accommodates a large table.

Depend on the size of the piece that has to be dado, I cut them on the saw with a dado set or use a router with home made T-guide. We don't do much dado anymore.
Old 11-20-2020, 09:33 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #151 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAtarga View Post
If you've got a "permanent" location for the shop - I'd say go ahead and get the contractor model saw.
Routers can be used for the dado options when needed for the most part. However, if you're into making box joints for drawers and boxes - the dado stack on the table saw would be MUCH more accurate.

Here's my Sawstop setup that replaced my Delta saw. The table structure behind it was then modified to fit the larger Sawstop footprint, so I've got a full 8' by 8' work surface including the saw table. This is the 52" version cabinet model. Dust collection and power to the saw are in a trough you see to the right of the cabinet.
That's a nice saw. BRand new?
Old 11-20-2020, 09:34 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #152 (permalink)
 
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Cool. He was 60 when I was born. My dad was from a second marriage. He was born in 1910 so was a young man through the depression. He passed away while I was in college and we traveled (dad in the Navy) when I was younger, so I didn't really get to know him as an adult. Due to living through the depression, I'm sure he didn't spend needlessly, but I suspect he also bought quality when he did spend money.
The old couple next door to my parents were depression era people. I was in high school and was helping her out with a drawer back in the 80s. Upon opening the drawer, a thousand plastic bags came flying out. She said, young man, "You may laugh at me for saving all the bags and other useless items, we grew up in the depression, so everything must be saved for the rainy days to come." until one come across an event like that, we can read and watch TV all day long but will never get it. Those are hard working people.
Old 11-20-2020, 09:39 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #153 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by LWJ View Post
Saw stop HQ is just down the street last I checked. If they have a company store or similar give me a PM maybe we can make something happen.
At 350#, shipping would probably be insane. There are, apparently a few stores in Houston that stock/sell them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAtarga View Post
If you've got a "permanent" location for the shop - I'd say go ahead and get the contractor model saw.
Routers can be used for the dado options when needed for the most part. However, if you're into making box joints for drawers and boxes - the dado stack on the table saw would be MUCH more accurate.

Here's my Sawstop setup that replaced my Delta saw. The table structure behind it was then modified to fit the larger Sawstop footprint, so I've got a full 8' by 8' work surface including the saw table. This is the 52" version cabinet model. Dust collection and power to the saw are in a trough you see to the right of the cabinet.
That's a sweet setup! I see you've got the "T-glide" fence. Is that a good enough fence to not need an upgrade?

I did use my dado blades on my old saw quite a bit, and could see using them in the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
Me, I get the cabinet saw if not, the contractor's saw at the very least. Job site saw would by my only saw that rides in back of a pick up truck to cut trims and scribe. Cast iron wings are great and solid, the stamp steels will work but feels flimsy. I can't say this enough to anyone that has limited space and needs to mover the saw around. Pay for a HTC mobile base. They are heavy dty and once locked, do not move even if you have to rip a 4x8, 3/4 plywood. Its worth the additional safety. Nothing like having a saw move on you when ripping a full sheet on the saw. Get the mobile base that accommodates a large table.

Depend on the size of the piece that has to be dado, I cut them on the saw with a dado set or use a router with home made T-guide. We don't do much dado anymore.
Mobile base, OK, good to know.

It popped into my head today or maybe yesterday, I'm not completely certain if the garage has power. I think the garage is ~150' from the house. I can't remember if it's got an automatic or manual garage door or overhead lights or anything. It's really not used as a garage. It was mostly used to store ATVs and lawn mowers. There is an oak tree that's probably 20-30' from the garage that's got a small power outlet and some lights in the tree, so maybe, or maybe not too tough to get power to the garage, but I can't be sure. It's obviously something that I'll be looking into and rectifying. It'd be a real beyotch to do all of the work on the sidewalk outside the house.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten

Last edited by masraum; 11-21-2020 at 05:22 PM..
Old 11-21-2020, 05:13 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #154 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by look 171 View Post
The old couple next door to my parents were depression era people. I was in high school and was helping her out with a drawer back in the 80s. Upon opening the drawer, a thousand plastic bags came flying out. She said, young man, "You may laugh at me for saving all the bags and other useless items, we grew up in the depression, so everything must be saved for the rainy days to come." until one come across an event like that, we can read and watch TV all day long but will never get it. Those are hard working people.
I think it's unfortunate for me that I never really got to talk to anyone about those times that lived through them. My grandfather passed when I was in college. I wasn't really that focused on relatives at that time. My loss, for sure.
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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-21-2020, 05:16 PM
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Nice!

I was watching another video of a guy talking about making a workbench. He said that he buys 2"x12"x16' boards to make workbenches because "they" use better quality boards for 16' lengths. He then rips and crosscuts them in half. I thought that was interesting. I feel like I've also seen or read something talking about S2 or S2S boards, so you get the 2 flat faces, but 2 rough edges. I'm not afraid to use a hand plane or maybe the 3 1/4" planer that Zeke posted about.

I watched this entire 9 part series. I think that's 4.5-5 hours. I don't plan to build this bench, and absolutely would not build it the way that he did (exclusively with hand tools), but I learned a ton of stuff.

One thing that I found interesting is that most of the stuff that I've watched or read about work benches as all about having the front of the bench flush (legs, apron, edge of top and the front face of the back jaw of the face clamp should all be on the same plane so that any part of the front of the bench can be used to clamp material. It makes sense to me, and I've seen how it could be useful. Also, most of what I've seen seems to like to have the face vise on the far left front end so it's out of the way (and with the front face of the rear jaw flush with the front of the table). Many designs also have the ends all flush so if you've got a tail vice, it's similar and can be used to clamp things to the end of the bench.

For his bench, the legs were set back, the front apron of the table has protruding bolt heads, the face vice is inside the legs which are not at the extreme ends so it's almost closer to offset from the center than it is to on the left end. The face vice is also out in front of the front edge of the bench.

I can understand how some folks like having a tool tray and some don't, but the other bits seem like great design plans.

Not the bench that he made in the video, but one that someone else built from the same plans.

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Steve
'08 Boxster RS60 Spyder #0099/1960
- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-21-2020, 05:49 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #156 (permalink)
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OK, now I know why he doesn't put the front of the rear jaw flush with the front of his workbench.

And the earlier part of the video addresses why none of the tables he works has any holes for bench dogs too.
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Old 11-21-2020, 06:46 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #157 (permalink)
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I watched this entire 9 part series. I think that's 4.5-5 hours. I don't plan to build this bench, and absolutely would not build it the way that he did (exclusively with hand tools), but I learned a ton of stuff.

One thing that I found interesting is that most of the stuff that I've watched or read about work benches as all about having the front of the bench flush (legs, apron, edge of top and the front face of the back jaw of the face clamp should all be on the same plane so that any part of the front of the bench can be used to clamp material. It makes sense to me, and I've seen how it could be useful. Also, most of what I've seen seems to like to have the face vise on the far left front end so it's out of the way (and with the front face of the rear jaw flush with the front of the table). Many designs also have the ends all flush so if you've got a tail vice, it's similar and can be used to clamp things to the end of the bench.

For his bench, the legs were set back, the front apron of the table has protruding bolt heads, the face vice is inside the legs which are not at the extreme ends so it's almost closer to offset from the center than it is to on the left end. The face vice is also out in front of the front edge of the bench.

I can understand how some folks like having a tool tray and some don't, but the other bits seem like great design plans.

Not the bench that he made in the video, but one that someone else built from the same plans.

I really do not understand that drop or step? It leaves such small work surface. If you are building furniture, fine, but anything else, More bench top is needed imo. No end vice is needed. If a piece is that long, I would just take a clamp and camp it to the bench. Its much faster to drag that long piece of lumber to the top, line it up and fetch a bench dog just to hold it in place. Its really an old fashion way of getting lumber flat or straighten. I suppose there's joy in that type of work. Its much easier to get S2S and straight line lumber and start making your project instead of having to mill it. Again, My stupid opinion.
Old 11-21-2020, 07:34 PM
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That's the tool tray. I think he does a ton of work using hand tools, and mostly builds furniture. To build this thing, the only power tool that he used was a cordless drill/driver, and that was only to drill pilot holes or install small screws. The rest of the bench was made using hand saws, chisels, and various kinds of planes including router planes and rabbet planes.
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- never named a car before, but this is Charlotte.
'88 targa SOLD 2004 - gone but not forgotten
Old 11-22-2020, 05:14 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #159 (permalink)
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While I admire the skill of some of these guys, what's more impressive is their desire to make endless work for themselves by doing everything by hand.

I'm waiting for one of them to plant his own tree seedlings, so that he can grow his own wood.

Eventually.

Old 11-22-2020, 05:30 AM
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