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HardDrive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Columbus, OH
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2 inch steel drain pipe going into the stack....oh boy....

I'm updating a kitchen, and now that I have the walls open, I've decided to get rid of the galvanized drain pipe that is in the walls. The pipe of concern here is the one that terminates in the stack, on the right in the photo in the photo below.

The standard procedure here would be get a huge pipe wrench, heat it with torch, curse a lot and hope it breaks free. But I'm wondering if its worth it. Why not cut the pipe off 12 inches from the stack, clean the corrosion from inside of the galvanized steel pipe, and transition to PVC using a rubber coupling? Its seems like a better option than battling that nasty old corroded joint, and potentially ending up with the pipe broken off.

The rubber coupling won't last forever, but the junction is in the crawl space under the house, and can be reached with relative ease.

What say yea Pelican plumbers?

EDIT: God damn Ifcuhing piece of crap is displaying the photo on its side. Lean yer head to the left......

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Last edited by HardDrive; 03-26-2012 at 09:35 AM..
Old 03-26-2012, 09:31 AM
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Actually that's the way to do it because you otherwise would be using a threaded fitting in the iron pipe anyway.

That's some funny looking plumbing to me. The main riser there looks like a vent.
Old 03-26-2012, 09:36 AM
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Is that gavinized threaded into the cast?
It looks like hub and spigot from the photo.

I would do exactly as you had planned. Cut it and see what is inside.
People cover the rubber Fernco adaptors under soil. Don't think that you would ever have a problem with it.
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Old 03-26-2012, 10:55 AM
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Took me a minute to realize the picture is sideways.

I'd get a pipe cutter or a Sawzall and cut it off as you said. Play with it too much and you might break the cast iron pipe and end up repairing/replacing it as well.

Old 03-26-2012, 11:15 AM
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It's not hard to do this properly. Cut the 2" pipe off near the threaded flange, but leave a bit - enough to grab with big channel locks (1 inch or so).
To get the remaining bit of 2" pipe out, cut from the inside of the pipe (upwards) until you're almost through the pipe. You don't want to go gangbusters and rip into the female threads of the stack fitting; just cut through the inside pipe until all that's left is pretty much the male threads. You should now be able to grab the pipe with the channel locks and collapse it the width of the saw cut. It should twist right out at that point. If not, make another outward cut next to the first (1/4 inch or so over) and remove that little bit of pipe, then you can collapse the pipe even more.
By cutting upwards, even if you do damage the female threads a bit, it won't leak (unless the whole stack is backed up)
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
It's not hard to do this properly. Cut the 2" pipe off near the threaded flange, but leave a bit - enough to grab with big channel locks (1 inch or so).

To get the remaining bit of 2" pipe out, cut from the inside of the pipe (upwards) until you're almost through the pipe. You don't want to go gangbusters and rip into the female threads of the stack fitting; just cut through the inside pipe until all that's left is pretty much the male threads. You should now be able to grab the pipe with the channel locks and collapse it the width of the saw cut. It should twist right out at that point. If not, make another outward cut next to the first (1/4 inch or so over) and remove that little bit of pipe, then you can collapse the pipe even more.

By cutting upwards, even if you do damage the female threads a bit, it won't leak (unless the whole stack is backed up)
Clever! I love learning things like this here!
Old 03-26-2012, 10:50 PM
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No hub connector, done.
Old 03-26-2012, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by TheMentat View Post
Clever! I love learning things like this here!
Works well on horizontal pipes entering the waste. As mentioned, cut towards the top so that any cut threads will be at the top. Pipe dope should seal the fitting so that it doesn't leak. This is done under sinks all the time where threaded needs to be replaced with threaded.

But this situation calls for plastic to replace the iron pipe. Why go to that extra work only to thread in a new nipple that will be used to connect the old with the new via the no hub clamp?
Old 03-27-2012, 08:42 AM
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:42 AM
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