Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Miscellaneous and Off Topic Forums > Paint, Bodywork & Detailing Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Learned by do'n twice
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 351
Need Some Paint Advice from the Pros

I am a self-taught painter. Never did it professionally. but have painted a dozen or more cars and am now modestly competent. I've painted a couple of cars using acrylic enamel, acrylic laquer (both solid color and base/clear), and a couple of polyurethane base/clear. I mostly paint panels, not whole cars but I've painted a few.

I've run into major problems once or twice due to lack of experience such as paint lifting, paint applied WAY to dry (went on like sandpaper) and I really would like to do a decent job the first time this time.

I am hoping that with your professional experience you guys could provide some insight.

I'm getting ready to paint my son's 86 944 NA. There was a bit of body work necessary and we primed up those areas and blocked them out but just wet sanded the rest of the car. According to the PO he had a MAACO paint job a number of years (5 - 10 ??) ago so although I would like to spray a 2 stage base/clear coat polyurethane I'm going with a single stage acrylic enamel to avoid any possibility of crinkle/lifting of the, most likely acrylic enamel, MAACO paint. I've had it happen before after painting acrylic laquer over enamel and the only cure was aircraft stripper to bare metal and redo all the bodywork. A huge PITA and hundreds of hours of extra time. Any hints on avoiding this possibility would be greatly appreciated. I would also like to avoid epoxy primer, or ANY more primer if possible.

I'm buying the paint from TCPGlobal. Maybe not the best but since this is a project for my son's first car I am trying to economize. I plan on adding the "wet look" hardener to the paint to try and get a better look. Would you suggest using a flex additive to the paint before spraying the plastic parts and front spoiler, or simply NOT adding the hardener for those pieces, or ???

I'm cutting some corners and this is not going to be a concourse quality job but I do want it to look as good as I can get it within budget.

Thanks for any insight you may be able to provide.

jmd_forest
__________________
86 944 NA - Brought back from the dead
Old 02-03-2008, 11:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 532
I hope I can be of some use, since lacquers and acrylic enamel have been exctint from the L A area for a long time.

First of all, do you think that the current maaco paint can hold a new paint job, if that paint is not a good base, then you will be wasting your time.

Second, buying less expensive paints with extra additives, usually amount to the same or close amount of a good quality paint, add them up, before you make your decision, In your area, you may be able to buy DCC paint made by PPG (that is if we are talking single stage solid colors) One gallon should be enough to paint the whole car and no other additive is needed.

Of course painting a whole car is different from a spot jobs, if your compressor does not keep up, you may run into a different kind of trouble.
__________________
"EVER SINCE EXCUSES WERE INVENTED, EVERYBODY IS PERFECT"
http://axiom-motorsports.com/
Rudy Ruano, Operations Manager.
Joseph Toliva, guy who signs my check
Old 02-03-2008, 06:40 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
Learned by do'n twice
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 351
Thank you for your response. Any help I get is appreciated. As I mentioned, although I've painted a dozen or so cars, I'm not a pro and can easily get tripped up on lack of experience. I used to paint a car every year or so with a couple of panels in between. I got into it years ago as a money making hobby buying and repairing high end insurance wrecks (944s, 325i/es, 300Zs, SUVs, whatever was hot selling at the time) but only do it now when the family needs a car.

How would I tell that the existing MAACO job can hold a new paint job? What should I be looking for? The paint on the hood had been really poorly done with what looked like a rough feather edging of lifting paint. I stripped the hood but the rest of the paint on the car seemed to be adhering well so we simply wet sanded it. There were a couple of spots that looked like a huge paint chip right to the bare metal so we ground down and filled those spots. I put a couple coats of Starlite SL-2K primer on the body work we did and blocked it out as well as a a light coat over anywhere my son sanded through the top coat on a few body edges. Once we get a break in the weather we'll wet sand again with a 600 grit before painting.

I'm mostly concerned about incompatibilities between the current paint and whatever we spray on. I'm really not interested in stripping a 20 year old car worth about $2k (86 Porsche 944). I'm looking to put a nice color coat on what will be my son's first car. I expect it to be damm nice but not perfect. I just don't want to be stupid and wind up with a crinkled/lifting finish.

Regarding the choice of paint: $89 for the 1 gallon paint kit (1 gallon acrylic enamel paint, 1 qt reducer, 1pt hardener) from TCP Global. I threw in a 1/2 pt of fisheye remover as well for $13 and an extra gallon of reducer for $21. Grand total under $125.

My compressor and breather setup are adequate for both panels and whole cars. IIRC its rated for 100CFM (big unit from sears I bought when I started painting about 20 years ago). I usually wet down my garage floor and drape the ceiling and walls with plastic sheets before painting to keep the dust down. I realize I won't get a concourse level job but I've gotten some really good results. When my wife's Mercedes came back from the body shop after a small finder bender covered by insurance, it was plain to see the the quality of work I had done previously (I bought the car as an insurance wreck) was actually better than the dealer work. In the right light you could see primer through the paint in a small area they hadn't laid on enough color.

Thanks again,

jmd_forest
__________________
86 944 NA - Brought back from the dead
Old 02-04-2008, 07:34 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 532
Looks like you are pretty set up, I am assuming you are familiar with the paint that you are using, so if you think that the maaco paint can hold, then go for it.

I would sand that paint with 400 grit, wet, and if it starts to roll up, or flake off, I would either seal it or sand it off, if those paints are not compatible, they will react.

We don't really work on that kind of budget, and use the highest quality of paints, so no much help here. let us know how it turns out.
__________________
"EVER SINCE EXCUSES WERE INVENTED, EVERYBODY IS PERFECT"
http://axiom-motorsports.com/
Rudy Ruano, Operations Manager.
Joseph Toliva, guy who signs my check
Old 02-04-2008, 08:29 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:41 PM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.