Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Miscellaneous and Off Topic Forums > Paint, Bodywork & Detailing Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Question Talk me through rust repair....Please

So how bad is this and what do I do now?







I figure the next step is to get the oil lines out of the way and start removing the rust.

What tools and techniques should I use to remove the rust?
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-17-2010, 08:36 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
tharbert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So. Illinois
Posts: 1,737
Garage
I'm guessing this is your 78 SC? Isn't this a "mid year" where rust is typically an issue? That looks like salt damage to me. You need to follow up with some good pictures of the front pan from underneath and around the batteries, the rocker panels, the longitudinals where the rear torsion bars live, the floor boards and the rear deck. These are areas normally prone to rust. That will give the experts here an idea of the extent of damage. There's a certain point where the towel must be thrown. It's different for everyone. Me and my 72? I'm in it to figure it out, learn what I can, get dirty and get it done. Others may be more prone to farm out the grunt work.

Let me volley this back to you and ask "What do you want to do?" What's your goal? Are you willing to do the work? Are you asking if it's worth tackling? And most importantly, did you read Freddie's 101 series especially about rust removal?
__________________
72 911T 2.4 MFI
06 Grand Touring Nissan 350Z
13 Escape SE 2.0
06 Kaw KLR-650A
10' Madone 5.2/17' Lynskey ProCross
Old 09-17-2010, 09:41 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
dkbautosports.com
 
962porsche's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: branford ct
Posts: 3,316
pull the front glass i bet you will find some rust under the gasket there . sand blast and weld in some patches . prep and paint .
Old 09-18-2010, 06:04 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
1980 911 SC
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Lewes, Delaware
Posts: 1,201
Garage
Doing it yourself?

How much time/money do you want to spend?

If you don't want to start cutting and welding Stop Rust POR15 could be your friend.

Just curious, what does it look like around the bumper shock mounts.
__________________
Life's a Beach
Old 09-18-2010, 06:54 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharbert View Post
I'm guessing this is your 78 SC? Isn't this a "mid year" where rust is typically an issue? That looks like salt damage to me. You need to follow up with some good pictures of the front pan from underneath and around the batteries, the rocker panels, the longitudinals where the rear torsion bars live, the floor boards and the rear deck. These are areas normally prone to rust. That will give the experts here an idea of the extent of damage. There's a certain point where the towel must be thrown. It's different for everyone. Me and my 72? I'm in it to figure it out, learn what I can, get dirty and get it done. Others may be more prone to farm out the grunt work.

Let me volley this back to you and ask "What do you want to do?" What's your goal? Are you willing to do the work? Are you asking if it's worth tackling? And most importantly, did you read Freddie's 101 series especially about rust removal?
I had forgotten Freddie's series covered rust so I've re-read that.

The rocker covers had some good rust under the rubber strip but the rocker panels themselves are solid. the pan is good. (It appears the car was delivered with a good layer of under coating. As the pan is rust free.

I want to do as much as I can do/learn. It will remain a daily driver when I'm done so I'm not looking for perfection.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 962porsche View Post
pull the front glass i bet you will find some rust under the gasket there . sand blast and weld in some patches . prep and paint .
I do have a couple bubbles around the windshield. I've pretty much figured I'm into a windows out re-paint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailchef View Post
Doing it yourself?

How much time/money do you want to spend?

If you don't want to start cutting and welding Stop Rust POR15 could be your friend.

Just curious, what does it look like around the bumper shock mounts.
I'll spend as much time and money as it takes to do an acceptable job. Again not looking for perfection. I'm kinda anxious to build some body work skills but I'm starting from scratch there.

The bumper shock mounts need some work, too. I'll post pictures of those, soon.
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-19-2010, 06:22 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #5 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Here are some more pictures:

Front pan... I've got some light surface rust on the gas tank where the under coating peeled away


Rocker panels are solid





Passenger side bumper shock mount is rough on the top where the dirt/moisture collected.


The bottom of the mount is clean but you can see where the rust on the top has started to penetrate the inside of the trunk.
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-19-2010, 07:35 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #6 (permalink)
1980 911 SC
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Lewes, Delaware
Posts: 1,201
Garage
Take a screwdriver and start poking around that shock mount. You will find more rust there than you think. I replaced both sides on my SC. You can take a look here>>>http://forums.pelicanparts.com/paint-bodywork-discussion-forum/498431-front-bumper-shock-support-rust-repair.html
__________________
Life's a Beach
Old 09-19-2010, 08:59 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Bellwood, PA
Posts: 8,495
Garage
"...did you read Freddie's 101 series especially about rust removal?..."

Was this a thread in this forum?


Nevermind. I see the sticky.


Duh.........
__________________
97 2.5 Boxster, 78 911SC, '06 H-D Street Bob, '07 Audi S4 (daily driver)
Old 09-19-2010, 11:23 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #8 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveE View Post
"...did you read Freddie's 101 series especially about rust removal?..."

Was this a thread in this forum?


Nevermind. I see the sticky.


Duh.........

Double Duh... did ya see who created the thread used as the sticky?
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-19-2010, 11:50 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #9 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailchef View Post
Take a screwdriver and start poking around that shock mount. You will find more rust there than you think. I replaced both sides on my SC. You can take a look here>>>http://forums.pelicanparts.com/paint-bodywork-discussion-forum/498431-front-bumper-shock-support-rust-repair.html
I did and the rust was deeper than I thought but it doesn't appear to have spread anything like your experience.

Looks like I definitely have to learn how to weld.

I'll strip off other parts to get the total scope before diving in. Pictures to follow.
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-20-2010, 01:51 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #10 (permalink)
(Former 1968Cayman)
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rutherfordton NC
Posts: 2,388
Welding is not hard- and doing it correctly simply requires patience, a bit of thinking and proper preparation.

Do you have a MIG unit?
__________________
1968 911P (Paperweight)
Old 09-20-2010, 08:10 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #11 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1968Cayman View Post
Welding is not hard- and doing it correctly simply requires patience, a bit of thinking and proper preparation.

Do you have a MIG unit?

I don't have a MIG...yet. Any recommendations?
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-21-2010, 09:46 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #12 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 2,206
I have a Miller 180. It takes 220V and is a great little welder. For thinner material - like our cars - I bet you could get away just fine with a Miller 140 which is the 110V version.
__________________
'74 911 Red Sunroof Coupe, 3.6L, etc...
Old 09-21-2010, 01:33 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #13 (permalink)
1980 911 SC
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Lewes, Delaware
Posts: 1,201
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom '74 911 View Post
For thinner material - like our cars - I bet you could get away just fine with a Miller 140 which is the 110V version.
Yep, I have the Miller 140 autoset and never went above #4 or 5 on the heat setting.

Pick up a few sheets of 20 gauge to practisce on, after that the 16-18 gauge in our cars will seem easy.
__________________
Life's a Beach
Old 09-23-2010, 05:51 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #14 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
What about one of these?

90 Amp Flux Wire Welder
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-23-2010, 06:11 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #15 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 2,206
A unit that uses gas is a better way to go. Yes, it will cost more, but there will be way less splatter to deal with. I can't say if the actual welds are any better or worse though. Someone with more experience than I will answer on that.

There are a few threads on welders and welding in the 911 section and the off-topic section that would be helpful too.

Tom
__________________
'74 911 Red Sunroof Coupe, 3.6L, etc...
Old 09-24-2010, 10:41 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #16 (permalink)
1980 911 SC
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Lewes, Delaware
Posts: 1,201
Garage
I feel welding thin sheet metal is tricky enough that I want to make the process as simple as possible, and get as much "help" from the welder itself as I can.

Read thru the post, especially some by "Milt", he has some good insight. I can't recall anyone here using a flux core.

With sheet metal I want to be able to control everything, heat, wire speed and amount of sheilding gas.

I would recomend you buy the best welder you can possibly afford, you will be much happier in the long run.

I have used many type of HF tools but when it came time to choose a welder I never even considered them.
__________________
Life's a Beach
Old 09-24-2010, 12:55 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #17 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
While I'm shopping for a Millermatic 140 with gas, I bought a cheap angle grinder and some attachments and went to work.

The tools


Driver's side before


And after


I did this with the wire wheel and grinder. Should I have started with paint remover? Would it have taken off the undercoat?

I'm thinking I may be able to get away with patching the holes and covering it with POR-15. Thoughts?
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-25-2010, 01:30 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #18 (permalink)
Registered User
 
D911SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 835
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaddyGlenn View Post
And after


I did this with the wire wheel and grinder. Should I have started with paint remover? Would it have taken off the undercoat?

I'm thinking I may be able to get away with patching the holes and covering it with POR-15. Thoughts?
I was faced with the same decision a couple of months ago. The RHS bumper shock mount had surface rust only so I POR15'd it and am comfortable it will hold up well. The LHS was a bit messed up like yours. POR15 might hold it for a bit but you'd have to treat both sides of the metal, which means getting your tools in the front boot where the battery is.

Personally I think you should cut it out and weld in a new piece. If you're hanging on the car for a while you won't regret it. Sourcing a clean replacement and having someone weld it in nicely is not that much of a job given how far you have gone with it already. If you do it this way you can have piece of mind that the job was done right. I'd still POR15 it or some other similar rust treatment as you want to totally cover up bare metal for future nasties.

I think you were right not to use paint stripper - chemicals are messy and you run the risk of not cleaning it up properly afterwards.

Good luck with it!
__________________
1983 Porsche 911SC Zinc Metallic - 3.2SS PMO's, Rennshift, 22/28 TB's, partially backdated interior. 28 month restoration now complete
2010 BMW 135i - Love it.
www.project911sc.wordpress.com
Old 09-25-2010, 06:11 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #19 (permalink)
Tired Member
 
DaddyGlenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,312
Garage
Sometimes you hope that your lack of knowledge actually works in your favor and someone will say "there is an easier way." Deep down inside, I knew there wasn't. Just gotta keep telling myself that I can do it.

So, where does one source such parts of a car? And what is the year range I am looking for?
__________________
Glenn
Daily Driver - '78 911SC RoW, Track - '85.1 944
Wife's - '00 740iL (Sport),
Support vehicle - '00 Suburban 2500 4x4
Son's - '85.1 944
Old 09-26-2010, 06:11 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #20 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 

Tags
rust repair


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:09 AM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.