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The week after I got the engine out and cleaned up my parents drove out from the midwest to spend some time with us, see our new house, and help with a few projects.

We decided that we wanted to start tackling the living room. Pretty much the entire house, with the exception of the Kitchen and Bathroom had Popcorn ceilings. We had it tested to make sure there was no asbestos, and then when we were sure of that, we started gutting it.

Before fully moving in, we removed the popcorn from the ceilings in both bedrooms. That required sealing off the floor, spraying the ceilings with water from a garden sprayer, and scraping the ceiling. That part wasn't too bad. The hard part was skim coating and refinishing the surface we were left with, which really SUCKED! It was time-consuming having to do multiple coats between drying time.

So when it came to the next popcorn removal project, that gave us the idea to remove the drywall on the ceilings of our living room rather than scraping the popcorn off and skim coating the whole thing. I also had a sneaking suspicion that there was Tongue and Groove under the drywall because you could see it under the eaves on the exterior of the house.

Turns out, I was right on the T&G!

Before:



During:
Ironically the best tool for removing the drywall was our heavy-duty grill spatula, solid steel construction, wide, and long for good leverage.



After:



All this occurred the week prior to Luftgekuhlt, which happened to land on my birthday weekend. My wife and I went to Luft in the morning, popped over to a friends house in Silver Lake afterward, and then stopped at an after-party at The Motoring Club to drop my 993 back off.

I hadn't really been driving my 993 much after I put it up for sale so swapping the OZ wheels back on and taking it out to Luft was a real bday treat.

After Party:



Over Memorial Day Weekend, we started back up on house projects, which meant stripping the brown paint off the beams in the living room. After trying stripping vs sanding, we landed on stripping them because we thought it would save time. All in all, it probably would have taken the same amount of time to do it either way but we'll probably sand the beams in the dining room next time around because it needs to be done prior to staining them anyways. This was 14 hours of work over the three day weekend:



DONE!



With that stuff "done" I was finally able to spend some more time on the Avocado. After cleaning up the engine, I took the heads off to see what sort of damage, if any, had come from water sitting in the cylinders. One cylinder had some surface rust that I'm hoping could be removed during deglazing.



I was also able to see how the heads looked. Not bad, just dirty.



And then I was able to take the cylinders off and split the case! All the bearing were date stamped 1986, so this is the first time the case has been apart. All the bearings looked great and the only one showing *some* wear was the thrust bearing. Overall I'm happy with the condition of the crank, bearings, and most of the engine. Now to decide what's next...




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Old 08-11-2019, 11:40 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #41 (permalink)
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Looking good well done on rescuing this one
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1980 911 SC Targa Light Blue Metallic/Navy

1999 4Runner Limited - it won't quit running so I'm still driving
Old 08-12-2019, 07:09 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #42 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1980 SC Targa View Post
Looking good well done on rescuing this one
Thanks! It's a bit of a longer road than I intended...

Time for some updates.

It's been slow progress throughout the summer. After mulling over all my options after the last post, I decided to get the cracks welded as it seemed to offer the most value. We'll see how that works as a long-term solution.

With the engine case dropped off at the machine shop I spent the rest of my free time ordering parts, waffling on performance upgrades, and continuing the endless amount of cleaning that needs to be done with a flood car. To get a better idea of the condition of the shell and access more nooks and crannies, I pulled the gas tank, pressure washed and cleaned under the hood, interior, and engine bay. The shell itself is actually very clean.







After pulling the gas tank, I realized it had some small spots that were weeping along the seam. The shop I took it to said it wasn't really fixable so I bought a Dansk replacement tank instead. Once I got it, it was sanded, coated, painted, and installed.



Pushing the car around my garage/driveway, I could tell that there was some sort of issue with the steering. There was a point when turning the wheel left that it would stop, but only sometimes. I ended up assessing all the joints and bushings to find that they may have been a bit dry but weren't binding. After that, I decided to take the rack out. After pulling one of the boots open, water poured out of it! That means the steering rack shaft had been sitting in water for months, so much so, that the steel bushings that keep the shaft aligned in the rack housing had rusted to the shaft. There was my problem...





At that point, I decided to rebuild the rack (as opposed to sourcing a new/used/rebuilt one). The process was essentially: hammer the bushings off, sand and polish the shaft and bushings, lube everything with Mobil 1 synthetic grease, and put it all back together. Now it runs smoothly with no issues.



As for engine parts, the slope has become pretty slippery...

The shop that's welding the crack has been pretty helpful with a lot of the rest of the parts. They've measured and deglazed my cylinders, cleaned my pistons, refinished my flywheel, cleaned my heads, refinished and rebushed my rockers, and a handful of other things.

They recommended a rebuild of the original heads which I agreed with... however, I ended up sourcing a set of rebuilt, twin plugged, lightly polished heads instead. With a sale of my old heads, I ended up spending about half as much as I would have, had I sent my original heads out to get all that done at Ollies.

Once you have twin plug heads, you might as well raise the compression and get appropriate pistons... That lead to a set of 10.5:1 JE Pistons being purchased.



My wife and I had a wedding to attend in St Paul back in August and I found someone selling a set of Triumph itbs/megasquirt on the Pelican forums. I met up with them that Saturday morning and made a deal. I boxed them up and they traveled with me to Milwaukee, Denver, and finally home to LA after all the end of summer travels.

With all these upgrades, it would be silly to use stock cams and headers... Unfortunately those things aren't cheap. The depth with this build has varied throughout the summer. I initially found a used set of DRC 993 SS cams on the forums (when I was planning to reuse stock pistons) that when they arrived, one of them had been snapped in half.



That forced me back to the drawing board. Once I decided to get JE pistons that opened up a lot of cam options with the clearance that the valve pockets afford you. I spent months looking at dyno charts and scouring the boards for a used option. That never happened so I took the plunge on a DC44 with a 110 lobe separation angle. Seemed to be a good compromise between powerband and torque early on.

I noticed that a lot of the dyno charts I had been checking out had a set of aftermarket headers with larger primaries. I don't want to lose heat and the popular SSI options don't seem large enough for my goals. I found a set of Billy Boat 1 & 5/8" headers/muffler locally. Feel like I got lucky on that one!



I've started to reassemble the engine and will continue that adventure in the next post!
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Old 12-25-2019, 07:36 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #43 (permalink)
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Looking good. Glad you’re getting it done. My Datsun finally made it home last week and never have a smiled so much. So rewarding enjoying the fruits of your labor. Can’t wait to be chasing you in the canyons, with all those throttles singing!
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-1986 BMW 325e = the Daily
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Old 12-25-2019, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mAn View Post
Looking good. Glad youíre getting it done. My Datsun finally made it home last week and never have a smiled so much. So rewarding enjoying the fruits of your labor. Canít wait to be chasing you in the canyons, with all those throttles singing!
You and me both Simon! Glad to hear you got the Roadster home. Can't wait to go for a rip.

I'm going to dedicate the rest of this post to the engine build (at least where I'm at so far).

Got the case back from the shop and picked up a P201 stand. The inside of the case is bananas clean. Really impressed with what the hot tank was able to accomplish:



Next steps were to follow Wayne's advice and get all the nooks, crannies, and piston squirters clean, check all the bearing clearances, and start assembly.

Rods onto the crank:





Crank into right case half, along with intermediate shaft, oil pump, and new rubber seals.



After that, I was able to get the case sealed up with Loctite 574. Along with a better shot of the welding that took place. The case was meticulously cleaned, then heated up for the welding. After ~170k miles and whatever aluminum was initially used to cast these cases, there were still a lot of impurities which made it difficult to weld. It turned out well, flat, and with no warpage, which seems about as much as I could ask for.



ARP headstuds installed:



Rings onto pistons and then pistons into deglazed cylinders.



Then installing pistons/cylinders onto the rebushed rods with JE piston pins and clips. Those JE clips were a pain! The meat of my thumb was sore for a few days. Fortunately, I didn't drop any clips into the case itself.



Finally starting to get somewhere!



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Last edited by Gabe.; 12-25-2019 at 11:42 AM..
Old 12-25-2019, 10:07 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #45 (permalink)
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Next step up was to strip, sand, prep, and paint the engine tins. They were in pretty rough shape and get them installed onto the short block to continue on with the build.



This allowed me to lap and install the heads, sort of.



It was at this point that I realized that I forgot that the heads I bought had been machined for fire rings but nobody really knew what rings they had been machined for.

https://youtu.be/mxCXrTpMPNs

The ID is 98.0mm, OD is 107.0mm, with a depth of 1mm.

This is where I left things prior to heading out of town for the holidays. Right now my plan is to get copper rings custom cut (and I found a shop that can do it). I'm open to other things if the Pelicanites have ideas.

Once I get the rings and am back home I'll continue on with the rest of the rebuild.

Hope you all enjoy your holidays!
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Old 12-25-2019, 10:26 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #46 (permalink)
 
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This is a very enjoyable ride you're taking us along on. You're literally going to know every nook & cranny in this 911 before you're done - and I see that as a real plus. For the few complete builds I've done (other makes), I love being able to step back from the finished product and nodding internally that I'm familiar with everything on or in this car!


Forgive me if I missed it, but did you ever share the size and brand of minilite type wheels you have? Love those. Best of luck - thanks for keeping this thread alive.
Old 12-26-2019, 05:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToySnakePMC View Post
This is a very enjoyable ride you're taking us along on. You're literally going to know every nook & cranny in this 911 before you're done - and I see that as a real plus. For the few complete builds I've done (other makes), I love being able to step back from the finished product and nodding internally that I'm familiar with everything on or in this car!


Forgive me if I missed it, but did you ever share the size and brand of minilite type wheels you have? Love those. Best of luck - thanks for keeping this thread alive.
That's for sure! It's a blessing and a curse knowing all the decisions and details that went into the build.

The wheels are actually 16x7/8 Minilite Mag wheels and not replicas. Not sure on the offsets as they aren't listed on the casting anywhere that I could see with a quick look and a google search for the model number didn't really return any relevant data. The one front wheel I have off the car has "1237A" stamped into it.
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:50 AM
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Just came across your thread, very fun project and youíve got great momentum going, subscribed!

Curious - you seem pretty fluent with the engine bits, is this your first full engine overhaul and are you just following the book or have you had other grease under the fingernails?

Looking forward to seeing what youíll do with the induction, whatíre your plans to get through/around CA smog?

Keep up the great work!
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Old 01-21-2020, 09:27 AM
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Looks like a great project and I love the green - my poor little light blue '80 SC needs the same treatment - no floods thankfully just 40 years of driving...
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1980 911 SC Targa Light Blue Metallic/Navy

1999 4Runner Limited - it won't quit running so I'm still driving
Old 01-21-2020, 10:51 AM
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How did I miss this thread?? So glad to see you got the case welded and are moving forward with the build!

I TIG weld professionally and always turn away repair work like this. Aluminum is porous and the amount of contaminants (oil etc) in an engine case make it almost impossible to get that classic "stack of dimes" look that most customers expect/demand. But, that certainly does not mean that the weld is not structurally sound. I'd say you have a pretty solid chance of that crack never causing a problem for you.

Looking forward to following the rest of your build!

Matt
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vick View Post
Just came across your thread, very fun project and you’ve got great momentum going, subscribed!

Curious - you seem pretty fluent with the engine bits, is this your first full engine overhaul and are you just following the book or have you had other grease under the fingernails?

Looking forward to seeing what you’ll do with the induction, what’re your plans to get through/around CA smog?

Keep up the great work!
Thanks! This is my first full Porsche overhaul. I'm a hobbiest but I've done or helped with rebuilds on VW, BMW, and Audi engines. Hoping to add the LS in my truck to that list at some point too. The combination between Wayne's engine rebuild book and the Pelican forums has been very helpful when it comes to little details, tools, and sealant recommendations.

Smog shouldn't be too bad considering how old the car is. Swap the induction and a cat or register it elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1980 SC Targa View Post
Looks like a great project and I love the green - my poor little light blue '80 SC needs the same treatment - no floods thankfully just 40 years of driving...
Thank you. It's been pretty rewarding so far. With the engine build reaching the end I'm looking forward to moving onto new projects, like all the bodywork.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Solamar View Post
How did I miss this thread?? So glad to see you got the case welded and are moving forward with the build!

I TIG weld professionally and always turn away repair work like this. Aluminum is porous and the amount of contaminants (oil etc) in an engine case make it almost impossible to get that classic "stack of dimes" look that most customers expect/demand. But, that certainly does not mean that the weld is not structurally sound. I'd say you have a pretty solid chance of that crack never causing a problem for you.

Looking forward to following the rest of your build!

Matt
Hey Matt! Yea it took forever to get the welding done, I'm pretty sure the guy I had do it was just procrastinating because of the exact reason you stated (which I don't blame him for). I'm glad to see you get your car up and running.
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Last edited by Gabe.; 01-21-2020 at 02:09 PM..
Old 01-21-2020, 02:06 PM
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Hi all! Time for an update.

I indeed get the copper "gaskets" made from Copper Gaskets Unlimited. Lani was great to deal with and pretty much custom cut and shipped the next day.

They came with some instructions to anneal the copper using a torch. This in effect makes the copper softer and more easily adapts to whatever surface it's sealing. I figured that using a propane torch would take forever so I decided to try some alternative approaches to do multiple at once. My first thought was to use my gas grill and then my second thought was to try my gas stove. The burners are in a circle right? Seems like it would be a perfect tool.

It ended up working perfectly as the copper turned blue, green, and finally orange before you could pick it up and dunk it in cool water to complete the annealing process:

After that they got a copper spray, installed into the heads, heads mounted, and then torqued down.

A video of the process:
https://youtu.be/V7pZJ_D3Uhc





Then the heads and cam housings were mounted up:



Timing chain housing mounted with new chains, gaskets, and rails:



DC 44 Cams have been installed with a 110 LSA. All rocker arms have been resurfaced and pins/bushings that were out of spec have been replaced. Rocker arms have been installed on cylinders 1 & 4 to start the process of checking and setting the timing. This was a pain in the ass because high lift/duration cams that use a Bolt and not a Nut don't have a way to hold the cam in place to set the height. It was a lot of trial and error to get them set at the spec of 3.2mm





And with cam timing set, I sealed up the chain housings with new gaskets and loctite 574 on both sides.

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Old 03-15-2020, 09:24 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #53 (permalink)
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It was at that point that I realized that I had a pile of engine tins and various engine parts that needed to be cleaned, blasted, and painted.

I setup a fantastic rack system out of some chairs, a ladder, a broom, and a rake





I also needed to drill the holes for the twin plug setup in the lower valve covers:



It was at this point I realized how dirty/corroded these parts were, along with the fan, fan housing, and upper valve covers. I took a trip to harbor freight for some glass bead and blasted everything.





So my driveway turned into this:



While the parts looked like this:







After that I painted the fan housing black and clear coated all the parts that had just been bead blasted to protect the finish. It all looks fantastic!
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Old 03-15-2020, 09:57 AM
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With all these parts refreshed it was time to start assembling the rest of the engine!

Clearcoated valve covers mounted:


Engine mount bar installed:


Fan and housing mocked up


Blasted the engine breather, AC bracket, and throttle linkage mount, also degreased the fan shroud:




At this point the exhaust was ready to be mounted with new gaskets and copper coated nuts:




"All" together:

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Old 03-15-2020, 10:40 AM
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I had a pain in the ass time mounting the clutch. I mounted it, then realized I forgot to install the starter ring gear. Then when I installed it with the ring gear I realized I forgot the throwout bearing. Third time was the charm though!

Flywheel installed with new pilot bearing




I used a socket wrapped in electrical tape as an alignment tool, worked great!











I cleaned up the garage, did a 180 on the table, and covered it with a fresh section of cardboard to keep it clean.



I picked up a few parts for the EFI: 42mm insulators without the injector notch, distributor plug, crank sensor mount, and 36-1 trigger wheel from GSF.






My plan for EFI this entire time was to run the MS2 V3.57 ECU and harness that came with the X-Faktory kit with Bosch coil on plug to run the twin plug. I went down a deep rabbit hole learning/understanding how the coil triggering effects work.

The v3.57 board can run three outputs for a wasted spark COP setup but that means you need to split up each signal into 4 separate triggering wires.

There is also the need/desire to pick if you want to trigger the coils on the leading edge or falling edge of the toothed pickup. Leading edge is preferrable but not the way the ECU is setup. With the falling edge trigger, the coils trigger when they see zero volts, which means that the coils could ignite when you first turn the key. That is dumb.

Idk why Megasquirt designed the board that way but that means you need to add TC4427 chips to those circuits to invert the signal. There isn't anywhere to add those circuits to the v3.57 board, you need to add a secondary prototype board to make those work.

At this point I was going back and forth on what to do. This ECU would probably be better for someone with a single plug ignition, running a twin-plug distributor and CDI boxes, or someone ready/willing to do the mods to make it run better with coil on plug.

Hmmmmmmm...
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Old 03-15-2020, 11:07 AM
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I ultimately decided to bin the MS2 idea and pickup an MS3 pro. The MS3 Pro can natively run all Bosch ignition coils on a leading edge trigger and is also setup for sequential fueling/ignition with the addition of a Cam sensor.

This meant another trek down to Clewett for a Cam sensor.

This isn't really a small task to install and means drilling and tapping my brand new cam, oh well...

First you remove the plug on the back of the driver side cam housing, then make sure you're at TDC on the ignition stroke. Then you can mount the sensor housing and use the supplied aluminum spacer to drill a hole into your cam, tap it, install the bolt with red loctite, mount the sensor housing to the cam housing, and then you're done. You now have a Cam trigger!





It can be hot AF in socal so I've desired to keep the AC if at all possible. I wasn't sure if the AC compressor would clear the Triumph ITBs. I was lucky enough to be able to borrow an AC compressor from my friend Adam because I left the whole existing system connected and in my car so I didn't need to get the system evacuated.

The AC compressor does NOT clear the ITBs so I needed to put on my thinking cap. I decided to disassemble the throttle body nearest the AC compressor, remove the butterfly and shaft, trim the throttle body and the shaft, rethread it to m8x1.25, and double nut it so it doesn't come loose. This gave enough clearance to clear the AC compressor. Score!

I took zero pictures of this process, all video, so here's the final result:
https://youtu.be/IIFk82G0sOY

My Audi R8 coils also arrived so I test fit them, they're a bit on the long side. It was at this point I realized that most are running 1.8t and not the 2.0t/R8 coils for that reason





The MS2 that came with my setup won't be used anymore. I also found out that the MS3 Pro can run the Bosch Motronic 127-1 pickup that the 3.2 came with originally. That means that I don't need a few of the extra EFI pieces I now have. Namely the crank sensor, sensor holder, and GSF 36-1 trigger wheel.



For my pending wiring harness build I picked up some weather pack, delphi 280, and bosch EV1 connectors/pins. Some more TXL wire in 12 and 20 gauge, a Bussmann power distribution module, and relays. I think I have a few more sensors to pickup but I'm getting pretty close to start working on this part of the build.

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Old 03-15-2020, 12:03 PM
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I took a pause on the build the next few weeks because we were back to working on the house.

We had our house tented for termites (which is a common thing in socal) so that we could fix any wood damage, prep for paint, and then paint the whole house.

Mine and my wife's dads came into town to help us out. it was 8 long, tiresome, but ultimately really rewarding days.

Went from Tan/Brown:



To Blue/Grey:



We're planning to either paint the garage door the same color as the trim or replace the door with an aluminum/glass version.

Back of the garage:


I also decided to start working on bodywork. Starting with the complicated dent on the driver fender and then working around the car.

First tried a hammer and dolly. That may work if I had removed this fender from the car but there isn't enough room to swing the hammer and this steel is THICK!



After that first attempt I decide to weld on studs and use a slide hammer/puller. The results have been much better:



And then onto the dent on the roof so I can paint it and get a windshield installed:





I also ordered some 1.8t ignition coils. You can see that they're about half an inch shorter.


Makes a huge difference mounted in the spark plug holes:



All these updates bring the thread current. My plan is to finish the bodywork, respray the whole car, install glass, finish the wiring harness, and then break the engine in and shake down that whole part of the car. After that, full interior and I'll consider this phase "done" for now.
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Old 03-15-2020, 12:21 PM
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Bold efforts....to be commended.

John
Old 03-15-2020, 02:35 PM
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love the efforts.... jealous of the skills....

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Old 03-15-2020, 08:37 PM
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