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lespaul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 750
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dyerkes View Post
I too am interested in the tool, but I would prefer a set in a metal having similar characteristics to the stock metal. After several exchanges with Brad, he has indicated that Titanium would be a close match, but that the kit price would be higher, $325 vs. the current price of $175. The collars and screws would both be titanium. The weight reduction would be to knock the current SNAPGAP weight of 6.1 g down to 3.35 g vs. the OEM nut of 2.7 g. Otherwise the kit would be the same -- and, of course additional sets of shims would remain the same for both kits. The expansion coefficient for titanium is actually a bit less than steel, so the titanium collars would actually grip the steel adjustment screws a bit tighter than the steel collars when the two are heated by engine operation. To make this viable he would need to determine whether they would be marketable at that price point. To me it is a minor investment if it results in greatly simplifying the valve adjustment process, providing easily repeatable and accurate adjustments and has the same or better reliability of component parts. Please indicate if you would be interested in a titanium kit.
David and others who may be interested: After further evaluation, unless someone can provide me with a demonstrable benefit of reducing the weight this tiny amount on a 911 or 914 set up, I do not believe I will be offering the Titanium option. A respected engine builder I corresponded with is of the opinion that given the geometry of the Porsche valve train, this reduction would make no difference in performance. It might make a difference in an F1 engine. But, if it did make a material difference in the 911 engines, you would think Porsche would have long ago put the cast iron rocker arms on a diet.

Hell, for that matter if it really made a difference, any one can remove a few grams from the 911 rockers in a few minutes with an angle grinder and I don't see anyone doing that to enhance performance.
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Brad

Inventor of SNAPGAP - The Valve Adjustment Solution
European Patent No. 3256703 and U.S. Patents Pending
Go to SNAPGAP.US or PM me.
Old 10-10-2019, 06:20 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #81 (permalink)
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Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Higgs Field
Posts: 16,340
Quote:
Originally Posted by john walker's workshop View Post
Check with a feeler gauge?
It really is just that simple, kids. Seems like every few years someone posts a "better" way, which is really just more complicated and/or more expensive (if you buy their nifty tool).

The world's simplest way to do this: Don't even try to "check" any of them. Simply loosen the lock nut, then loosen the adjustment screw until the rocker moves enough to easily place the feeler gauge in the gap. Hold it there with one hand and, with the other, put a screw driver in the slot and push the adjustment screw down onto the feeler gauge until it makes firm contact. Then turn the screw driver until you take all of the play out, tighten the locknut, and you are done. This takes literally a minute or less, and no skill or "feel" whatsoever. And no elaborate, funky tools.

Way too many people let this simple procedure intimidate them. The whole question of what is too loose vs. what is too tight gets way over thought. The tolerances are very generous. If you can slide the feeler gauge without undue effort, and the rocker doesn't move with the feeler gauge in place, you are good to go. No need to overthink this, or to resort to weird little tools.
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Jeff
'72 911T 3.0 MFI
'93 Ducati 900 Super Sport
"God invented whiskey so the Irish wouldn't rule the world"
Old 10-10-2019, 09:32 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #82 (permalink)
Mighty Meatlocker Turbo
 
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Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: North TexASS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Higgins View Post
. . .

The world's simplest way to do this: Don't even try to "check" any of them. Simply loosen the lock nut, then loosen the adjustment screw until the rocker moves enough to easily place the feeler gauge in the gap. Hold it there with one hand and, with the other, put a screw driver in the slot and push the adjustment screw down onto the feeler gauge until it makes firm contact. Then turn the screw driver until you take all of the play out, tighten the locknut, and you are done. This takes literally a minute or less, and no skill or "feel" whatsoever. And no elaborate, funky tools.

Way too many people let this simple procedure intimidate them. The whole question of what is too loose vs. what is too tight gets way over thought. The tolerances are very generous. If you can slide the feeler gauge without undue effort, and the rocker doesn't move with the feeler gauge in place, you are good to go. No need to overthink this, or to resort to weird little tools.
To me, you are proposing doing a lot of needless work; most of the time only a couple of the rockers need any adjustment at all, so adjusting all of them for no good reason is not something I'm willing to do (on any engine that has measurable and adjustable lash). With a 911 engine, I first measure using the backside method (much easier for me to work the feeler blades that way), and then only make an adjustment if needed.
Old 10-10-2019, 10:35 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #83 (permalink)
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Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Higgins View Post
It really is just that simple, kids. Seems like every few years someone posts a "better" way, which is really just more complicated and/or more expensive (if you buy their nifty tool).

The world's simplest way to do this: Don't even try to "check" any of them. Simply loosen the lock nut, then loosen the adjustment screw until the rocker moves enough to easily place the feeler gauge in the gap. Hold it there with one hand and, with the other, put a screw driver in the slot and push the adjustment screw down onto the feeler gauge until it makes firm contact. Then turn the screw driver until you take all of the play out, tighten the locknut, and you are done. This takes literally a minute or less, and no skill or "feel" whatsoever. And no elaborate, funky tools.

Way too many people let this simple procedure intimidate them. The whole question of what is too loose vs. what is too tight gets way over thought. The tolerances are very generous. If you can slide the feeler gauge without undue effort, and the rocker doesn't move with the feeler gauge in place, you are good to go. No need to overthink this, or to resort to weird little tools.
As someone who does his best to make a living doing this work, whether I'm any good or not, I believe if any way or any tools makes the job for YOU easier, then why not. Its about accuracy in the end and if a tool makes you feel better that you have done the job correctly, go for it.

I have no alliance to any other company or tool , just think that we as humans are all different and some of us see it black and some see it white. Some see it easy to use a feeler gauge, then go for it, while others find using a tool easier, then great, use it. In the end, its about the final result, not so much how you got there.
Old 10-11-2019, 09:32 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #84 (permalink)
914-6Werkshop
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 2,556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Harvey View Post
As someone who does his best to make a living doing this work, whether I'm any good or not, I believe if any way or any tools makes the job for YOU easier, then why not. Its about accuracy in the end and if a tool makes you feel better that you have done the job correctly, go for it.

I have no alliance to any other company or tool , just think that we as humans are all different and some of us see it black and some see it white. Some see it easy to use a feeler gauge, then go for it, while others find using a tool easier, then great, use it. In the end, its about the final result, not so much how you got there.
Exactly! I'm a rank beginner when it comes to porsche engines but I can tune bikes and build and true bike wheels without a thought. We all have our own strengths. If there is a tool or device that lets us complement our weaknesses, real or perceived, why not.
Old 10-11-2019, 09:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #85 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 182
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Harvey View Post
As someone who does his best to make a living doing this work, whether I'm any good or not, I believe if any way or any tools makes the job for YOU easier, then why not. Its about accuracy in the end and if a tool makes you feel better that you have done the job correctly, go for it.

I have no alliance to any other company or tool , just think that we as humans are all different and some of us see it black and some see it white. Some see it easy to use a feeler gauge, then go for it, while others find using a tool easier, then great, use it. In the end, its about the final result, not so much how you got there.
Very well said, Neil. My sentiments exactly.
Old 10-11-2019, 11:29 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #86 (permalink)
 
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