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chrisp's Avatar
 
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Looking for a torque wrench recommendation?

I realize that this could be a highly subjective post but I am looking to buy a torque wrench and would like a recommendation from 911 owner. I want to get one and would like it to be versatile. What range should I get?

From your experiences, what's the most practical torque wrench for our cars?

I am sure several of you will ask what I will use it for. The answer is I don't know yet but I want to buy the right one the first time. I will use it all over the car including an engine rebuild some day.

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Old 01-06-2004, 09:33 AM
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You will need two. I prefer the beam scale as opposed to the "clicker" style because I personally believe it to be more accurate and stay calibrated longer. The two you will need are a 1/2" for torquing over 15lbs and a 1/4" for torquing under 15lbs.
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Old 01-06-2004, 09:35 AM
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I'll have to disagree with Kurt a little. I prefer the clicker type because the beam type can be impossible to read accurately in tight spots.

My advice is worth what you pay for it ;-}
Old 01-06-2004, 10:47 AM
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agreed you'll need at least two.

i prefer the clicker types.

i just bought a 250lbs snap-on one from ebay, very pleased with it and much cheaper than new.
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Old 01-06-2004, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by AZ1977911
I'll have to disagree with Kurt a little. I prefer the clicker type because the beam type can be impossible to read accurately in tight spots.

My advice is worth what you pay for it ;-}
I also have two of the clicker torque wrenchs, but I only use them when I can't use the beam wrench.
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Old 01-06-2004, 10:52 AM
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Find the search function at the top of the page and, *voila*, this thread will write itself.
Old 01-06-2004, 10:54 AM
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Let's not get too far off the subject, I am trying to get recommendations for the best trq range for a wrench if I could only buy one. Okay...if I could only buy two.

If someone has a relatively comprehensive list of torque values from bumper to bumper on a 911 then I could decide for myself.
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:01 AM
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i'd probably go for 0-100 (150 if poss) lbs. you wont need more than that very often.
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:04 AM
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chrisp, Get yourself a complete workshop manual for your '83. At least get the little "Spec" booklet. They have all the torque specs and more. See if you can find a printed copy of the parts manual covering your car. If not, get a bootleg CD copy of PET 6. I like to make personalized, car specific manuals for my cars.

I have a 1/2" click type Snap-On (200 ft-lb) for lug nuts, chassis bolts, axle bolts, stub axle, and such. I have a 3/8" Snap-On (100 ft-lb) for everything else. I have a 1/4" but never use it. If you are torquing the flywheel on a 912, 356, 547, etc. then you need a 3/4" wernch (600 ft-lb).

2c
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:21 AM
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Quote: "From your experiences, what's the most practical torque wrench for our cars?"

I'm a clicker guy too. However, if you want to see the torque that WAS on a fastner then the beam type is needed.

I have done fine with 0-100 for most of my Automotive needs. Remember though, the broader the range the less accurate it will be.
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:21 AM
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Top 3 Recommendations:

1. Hazet
2. Hazet
3. Hazet.

Wayne does not sell them. Check www.samstagsales.com
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:22 AM
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Ditto John above.
If the factory uses them, then they are good enough for me.
As a side note, the 959 tool bag had a Stahlwille torque wrench for the centerlock rims. These are really good too.
Old 01-06-2004, 11:40 AM
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My 1/2" drive 150 lb Sears clicker type torque wrench gets used every time I change a wheel or work in the tech line at a track event. It also works for CV joint bolts. That's 99% of the times I need a torque wrench. For rebuilding motors I have a couple of other torque wrenches - a fancy 1/2" drive clicker and a $100 beam type that I use for rod bolts.
Keep in mind that the use a of a torque wrench in most cases is fairly crude way of getting a certain bolt tension. Something like 80% of the torque is applied to overcome friction so the lube you use or the condition of the fastener may make a huge difference.
-Chris
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Old 01-06-2004, 11:58 AM
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Clicker types are much easier to use, esp. if access is poor (as it usually is on a Porsche). They do not hold accurate settings as well as the beam type.

I don't usually like Griot's Garage but their torque wrenches make sense -- free calibration -- you pay shipping only. You will need both sizes depending on what you do. Start with the 1/2 inch for wheel nuts.
Old 01-06-2004, 12:00 PM
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Didn't someone mention, in a past thread, that you can send to your wrench to Sears and get it calibrated as well?
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Old 01-06-2004, 12:03 PM
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Objective, find a flex head click type T-Wrench in Nm only 3/8 & 1/2" drive and lifetime warrantee...Nobody makes them.

After some research on T-Wrenches, this is what I have learned.

Flex head is nice since it helps eliminate the use of extensions (extensions reduce the amount of torque to the nut or bolt).

Precession instruments used to make T-Wrenches for snap on. Very nice, and PI still makes T-Wrenches. After 40+ years, Snap-on bought a T-wrench company (CGI or something) and said good bye to PI. Anyway, Snap on sells an electronic flex head T-wrench mfr by CGI for about $300+. It is very nice, and gives a digital read out and other nice features. Though nice, not sure of it in the long run and recalibration cost. PI makes the click type flex head in Ft-lbs with a Nm scale on it, but not just Nm.

PI mfrs split beam click type in Nm with flex head. From what I have been told by our snap-on guy, when CGI had trouble mfr the split beam click type, snap-on tried to go back to PI. PI said no (don't blame them).

Matco makes a nice flex head click type in 3/8 and 1/2" drive. However, it reads in Ft-LBS and Nm.

The click type from PI have some of the best specs and the longest # click cycles.

Griots catalog sells a nice T-Wrench, but not flex head, their calibration service (free if bought from them) sounds good

With the options available, for a flex head in Nm with the best reliability I would go with split beam click type mfr from PI (http://www.torqwrench.com) about $200 each
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Last edited by Jim Smolka; 01-06-2004 at 02:23 PM..
Old 01-06-2004, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Randy Webb
Clicker types are much easier to use, esp. if access is poor (as it usually is on a Porsche). They do not hold accurate settings as well as the beam type.

I don't usually like Griot's Garage but their torque wrenches make sense -- free calibration -- you pay shipping only. You will need both sizes depending on what you do. Start with the 1/2 inch for wheel nuts.
Randy brings up a good point. If you intend use the wrench for a lifetime you'll want to be able to get it calibrated. Griots offers free testing I see. Testing will only reveal if the wrench is "off". Does the calibration service offered by places like SnapOn include fixing an out of calibration torque wrench?
-Chris
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Old 01-06-2004, 12:11 PM
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You can even find Precision Instruments stuff on Ebay.... http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2370143977&category=42265

31 bucks, go figure...
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Old 01-06-2004, 12:17 PM
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I have two different ones:

1. 3/8 drive Snap-On, 5-75 lbs for engine building

2. 1/2 drive Snap-On, 50-250 lbs for everything else

Both are the click-type. Beam-types are great, but sometimes if you're in a tight spot, you can't read it.
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Old 01-06-2004, 12:33 PM
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there is a new torque meter from sears, that shows the reading digitally on a gauge. you can use the wrenches you already own, and simply put the torque head on it. dont have one, but i will soon. i would work great in those tight areas.

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Old 01-06-2004, 01:58 PM
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