Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > Porsche 911 Technical Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Registered User
 
chrisp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,942
Looking for a torque wrench recommendation?

I realize that this could be a highly subjective post but I am looking to buy a torque wrench and would like a recommendation from 911 owner. I want to get one and would like it to be versatile. What range should I get?

From your experiences, what's the most practical torque wrench for our cars?

I am sure several of you will ask what I will use it for. The answer is I don't know yet but I want to buy the right one the first time. I will use it all over the car including an engine rebuild some day.

__________________
'83 SC
Old 01-06-2004, 09:33 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
Friend of Warren
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 15,593
You will need two. I prefer the beam scale as opposed to the "clicker" style because I personally believe it to be more accurate and stay calibrated longer. The two you will need are a 1/2" for torquing over 15lbs and a 1/4" for torquing under 15lbs.
__________________
Kurt V
No more Porsches, but a revolving number of motorcycles.
Old 01-06-2004, 09:35 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
AZ1977911's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Chandler,AZ
Posts: 277
I'll have to disagree with Kurt a little. I prefer the clicker type because the beam type can be impossible to read accurately in tight spots.

My advice is worth what you pay for it ;-}
Old 01-06-2004, 10:47 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
dickster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: a few miles east of USA
Posts: 3,393
agreed you'll need at least two.

i prefer the clicker types.

i just bought a 250lbs snap-on one from ebay, very pleased with it and much cheaper than new.
__________________
Rich

'86 coupe

"there you are"
Old 01-06-2004, 10:50 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
Friend of Warren
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 15,593
Quote:
Originally posted by AZ1977911
I'll have to disagree with Kurt a little. I prefer the clicker type because the beam type can be impossible to read accurately in tight spots.

My advice is worth what you pay for it ;-}
I also have two of the clicker torque wrenchs, but I only use them when I can't use the beam wrench.
__________________
Kurt V
No more Porsches, but a revolving number of motorcycles.
Old 01-06-2004, 10:52 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #5 (permalink)
Nice guy eddie
 
speeder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: los angeles, CA.
Posts: 32,654
Garage
Find the search function at the top of the page and, *voila*, this thread will write itself.
__________________
Denis
"It was either Voltaire or Charlie Sheen who said, 'We are born alone. We live alone. We die alone. And anything in between that can give us the illusion that we're not, we cling to.'" -
-- Gabriel byrne
Old 01-06-2004, 10:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #6 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
chrisp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,942
Let's not get too far off the subject, I am trying to get recommendations for the best trq range for a wrench if I could only buy one. Okay...if I could only buy two.

If someone has a relatively comprehensive list of torque values from bumper to bumper on a 911 then I could decide for myself.
__________________
'83 SC
Old 01-06-2004, 11:01 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
dickster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: a few miles east of USA
Posts: 3,393
i'd probably go for 0-100 (150 if poss) lbs. you wont need more than that very often.
__________________
Rich

'86 coupe

"there you are"
Old 01-06-2004, 11:04 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Grady Clay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Arapahoe County, Colorado, USA
Posts: 9,032
chrisp, Get yourself a complete workshop manual for your '83. At least get the little "Spec" booklet. They have all the torque specs and more. See if you can find a printed copy of the parts manual covering your car. If not, get a bootleg CD copy of PET 6. I like to make personalized, car specific manuals for my cars.

I have a 1/2" click type Snap-On (200 ft-lb) for lug nuts, chassis bolts, axle bolts, stub axle, and such. I have a 3/8" Snap-On (100 ft-lb) for everything else. I have a 1/4" but never use it. If you are torquing the flywheel on a 912, 356, 547, etc. then you need a 3/4" wernch (600 ft-lb).

2c
__________________
ANSWER PRICE LIST (as seen in someone's shop)
Answers - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - $0.75
Answers (requiring thought) - - - - $1.25
Answers (correct) - - - - - - - - - - $12.50
Old 01-06-2004, 11:21 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #9 (permalink)
Registered User
Quote: "From your experiences, what's the most practical torque wrench for our cars?"

I'm a clicker guy too. However, if you want to see the torque that WAS on a fastner then the beam type is needed.

I have done fine with 0-100 for most of my Automotive needs. Remember though, the broader the range the less accurate it will be.
__________________
Warren & Ron, may you rest in Peace.
Old 01-06-2004, 11:21 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #10 (permalink)
Moderator
 
304065's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,515
Top 3 Recommendations:

1. Hazet
2. Hazet
3. Hazet.

Wayne does not sell them. Check www.samstagsales.com
__________________
'66 911 #304065 Irischgruen
Ex-'71 911 PCA C-Stock Club Racer #806 (Sold 5/15/13)
Ex-'88 Carrera (Sold 3/29/02)
Ex-'91 Carrera 2 Cabriolet (Sold 8/20/04)
Old 01-06-2004, 11:22 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #11 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,232
Ditto John above.
If the factory uses them, then they are good enough for me.
As a side note, the 959 tool bag had a Stahlwille torque wrench for the centerlock rims. These are really good too.
Old 01-06-2004, 11:40 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #12 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
ChrisBennet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Nashua, NH USA
Posts: 8,107
My 1/2" drive 150 lb Sears clicker type torque wrench gets used every time I change a wheel or work in the tech line at a track event. It also works for CV joint bolts. That's 99% of the times I need a torque wrench. For rebuilding motors I have a couple of other torque wrenches - a fancy 1/2" drive clicker and a $100 beam type that I use for rod bolts.
Keep in mind that the use a of a torque wrench in most cases is fairly crude way of getting a certain bolt tension. Something like 80% of the torque is applied to overcome friction so the lube you use or the condition of the fastener may make a huge difference.
-Chris
__________________
'80 911 Nogaro blue Phoenix!
'18 BMW 340i xdrive
http://members.rennlist.org/messinwith911s/
Old 01-06-2004, 11:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #13 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Randy Webb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Planet Eugene
Posts: 4,348
Clicker types are much easier to use, esp. if access is poor (as it usually is on a Porsche). They do not hold accurate settings as well as the beam type.

I don't usually like Griot's Garage but their torque wrenches make sense -- free calibration -- you pay shipping only. You will need both sizes depending on what you do. Start with the 1/2 inch for wheel nuts.
Old 01-06-2004, 12:00 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #14 (permalink)
Registered User
Didn't someone mention, in a past thread, that you can send to your wrench to Sears and get it calibrated as well?
__________________
Warren & Ron, may you rest in Peace.
Old 01-06-2004, 12:03 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #15 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Jim Smolka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Hickory NC USA
Posts: 2,491
Objective, find a flex head click type T-Wrench in Nm only 3/8 & 1/2" drive and lifetime warrantee...Nobody makes them.

After some research on T-Wrenches, this is what I have learned.

Flex head is nice since it helps eliminate the use of extensions (extensions reduce the amount of torque to the nut or bolt).

Precession instruments used to make T-Wrenches for snap on. Very nice, and PI still makes T-Wrenches. After 40+ years, Snap-on bought a T-wrench company (CGI or something) and said good bye to PI. Anyway, Snap on sells an electronic flex head T-wrench mfr by CGI for about $300+. It is very nice, and gives a digital read out and other nice features. Though nice, not sure of it in the long run and recalibration cost. PI makes the click type flex head in Ft-lbs with a Nm scale on it, but not just Nm.

PI mfrs split beam click type in Nm with flex head. From what I have been told by our snap-on guy, when CGI had trouble mfr the split beam click type, snap-on tried to go back to PI. PI said no (don't blame them).

Matco makes a nice flex head click type in 3/8 and 1/2" drive. However, it reads in Ft-LBS and Nm.

The click type from PI have some of the best specs and the longest # click cycles.

Griots catalog sells a nice T-Wrench, but not flex head, their calibration service (free if bought from them) sounds good

With the options available, for a flex head in Nm with the best reliability I would go with split beam click type mfr from PI (http://www.torqwrench.com) about $200 each
__________________
'75 914-6 3.2 (Track Car)
'81 SC 3.6 (Beast)
'993 Cab (Almost Done Restoring)

Last edited by Jim Smolka; 01-06-2004 at 02:23 PM..
Old 01-06-2004, 12:11 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #16 (permalink)
Registered User
 
ChrisBennet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Nashua, NH USA
Posts: 8,107
Quote:
Originally posted by Randy Webb
Clicker types are much easier to use, esp. if access is poor (as it usually is on a Porsche). They do not hold accurate settings as well as the beam type.

I don't usually like Griot's Garage but their torque wrenches make sense -- free calibration -- you pay shipping only. You will need both sizes depending on what you do. Start with the 1/2 inch for wheel nuts.
Randy brings up a good point. If you intend use the wrench for a lifetime you'll want to be able to get it calibrated. Griots offers free testing I see. Testing will only reveal if the wrench is "off". Does the calibration service offered by places like SnapOn include fixing an out of calibration torque wrench?
-Chris
__________________
'80 911 Nogaro blue Phoenix!
'18 BMW 340i xdrive
http://members.rennlist.org/messinwith911s/
Old 01-06-2004, 12:11 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #17 (permalink)
Registered User
You can even find Precision Instruments stuff on Ebay.... http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2370143977&category=42265

31 bucks, go figure...
__________________
Warren & Ron, may you rest in Peace.
Old 01-06-2004, 12:17 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #18 (permalink)
Registered User
 
chibone_914's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Los Angeles,Ca. USA
Posts: 641
I have two different ones:

1. 3/8 drive Snap-On, 5-75 lbs for engine building

2. 1/2 drive Snap-On, 50-250 lbs for everything else

Both are the click-type. Beam-types are great, but sometimes if you're in a tight spot, you can't read it.
__________________
Thank you!

John

johnechi@hotmail.com
Old 01-06-2004, 12:33 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #19 (permalink)
Registered User
 
vash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: in my mind.
Posts: 27,946
Garage
Send a message via AIM to vash
there is a new torque meter from sears, that shows the reading digitally on a gauge. you can use the wrenches you already own, and simply put the torque head on it. dont have one, but i will soon. i would work great in those tight areas.

__________________
poof! gone
Old 01-06-2004, 01:58 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #20 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:16 AM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2020 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.