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Mike, changing the hoses is not difficult just dirty and a little time consuming. First have the A/C system evacuated buy the shop.

The easiest way is to just order new hoses and just do a swap. The cheaper way is to take the old hoses off and re-use the ends. If you have a digital camera and a sketch pad you can remove the old hoses and cover the ends of the evaporator & condensers to keep dirt out. Have the A/C shop replace the rubber hoses with barrier hose and put them back on. I would suggest you replace the receiver-dryer while you have the system open.

Before I upgraded my A/C system to a Griffith’s Dual Khuel system I could get OK cooling in the summer. Now it is great for an air cooled 911.
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Old 10-07-2010, 06:27 AM
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Mark,
Changed my hoses and fittings while converting to R134a in late spring. Temp is 32 degrees at vent. Posted on another forum and was told that's way too cold. I live in Dallas. As you know, it got HOT here this summer. Have you had any problems?
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Old 10-07-2010, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by 79 Euro View Post
Mark,
Changed my hoses and fittings while converting to R134a in late spring. Temp is 32 degrees at vent. Posted on another forum and was told that's way too cold. I live in Dallas. As you know, it got HOT here this summer. Have you had any problems?
Andy,

At 32F your evaporator, in a high humidity environment, may be prone to freeze-up.

I reset the temp switch in our '86 for a 38F center duct temp at this setting on a 72F day,
along with a 10F compressor operating window (45-55F).

You may pm me for performance details.

Good luck,

Gerry


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Last edited by 86 911 Targa; 10-09-2010 at 07:33 AM..
Old 10-07-2010, 07:22 AM
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Mike,

After checking for leaks, did he put more freon in and did it last another 3 weeks? If he added a leak detector and didn't find leaks at the main components (hoses, evaporator, compressor, condensers, dryer) then it's probably the hoses. Did he convert from R12 to R134a freon? As you mentioned and in the postings above, our older 911s have non barrier hoses that leak R12 slowly and will leak R134a faster but 3 weeks is much faster than I've experienced. There is a lot of hose to follow from front to back but you should be able to view it all with a little work.
No we only put freon in once and it leaked out. Didn't follow up after that. Also, don't know which freon was used. Problem is, my mechanic was involved in a serious motorcycle accident in August and has been in a coma & on life support since. As a result, his shop has been permanently closed. We're praying for him. One of my question is this. Can I find a schematic for 85 911 A/C lines. I have no idea where they run. I would love to start there primarily to determine if this is a job I want to tackle. Thanks.
Old 10-08-2010, 05:22 AM
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Nice work. I agree with Gerry. While 32 degrees sounds great. you will probably have better luck with 37-38 degrees when its humid... which is all the time in Houston. I actually run about 39-40 degrees all the time and with the Super High output fan from Griffiths its more than adequate...
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Last edited by brads911sc; 10-08-2010 at 05:54 AM..
Old 10-08-2010, 05:50 AM
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Sorry to hear about your tech.

It will be difficult to find the leak without putting freon with leak detector in so you can actually see where it is leaking from.

Here's a diagram from the manual. It only shows one condenser by but there are, of course, two - one up front and one in the rear so, basically the hoses run

From Compressor to Rear Condenser to Front Condenser to Dryer to Expansion Valve to Evaporator and back to Compressor.

The hoses that will be hard to see will be those running behind the engine to the bottom of the vehicle and the one that runs from the dryer to the expansion valve in the smugglers box with the evaporator.


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Old 10-08-2010, 06:37 AM
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It's suggested not to inject liquid leak detector into the system. Why? The system has a finite volume for compressor oil and refrigerant. Adding other liquids only displaces the space for refrigerant in the system, thus decreasing potential cooling. It's better to load a small qty. of real refrigerant into the system, then use a refrigerant sniffer to locate the source of the leak. Any AC shop should handle this procedure.

Sherwood
Old 10-08-2010, 07:37 AM
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It's suggested not to inject liquid leak detector into the system. Why? The system has a finite volume for compressor oil and refrigerant. Adding other liquids only displaces the space for refrigerant in the system, thus decreasing potential cooling. It's better to load a small qty. of real refrigerant into the system, then use a refrigerant sniffer to locate the source of the leak. Any AC shop should handle this procedure.

Sherwood
Thanks Soooo much guys. I appreciate your input !!

Mike
Old 10-08-2010, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 911pcars View Post
It's suggested not to inject liquid leak detector into the system. Why? The system has a finite volume for compressor oil and refrigerant. Adding other liquids only displaces the space for refrigerant in the system, thus decreasing potential cooling. It's better to load a small qty. of real refrigerant into the system, then use a refrigerant sniffer to locate the source of the leak. Any AC shop should handle this procedure.

Sherwood
NONESENSE....!

If you put leak detector in the system on the assumption, in the process, of finding a leak then once the leak is found and fixed you get to "start", fill, all over again anyway.
Old 10-09-2010, 07:24 AM
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Would you need to flush your system if you use the leak detector?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwest View Post
NONESENSE....!

If you put leak detector in the system on the assumption, in the process, of finding a leak then once the leak is found and fixed you get to "start", fill, all over again anyway.
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Old 10-09-2010, 07:27 AM
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NONESENSE....!

If you put leak detector in the system on the assumption, in the process, of finding a leak then once the leak is found and fixed you get to "start", fill, all over again anyway.
Nonsense? No. Difference of opinion. When evacuating the system, compressor oil and remaining dye remain. Perhaps older R12 systems can spare extra system volume for the various dyes a DIYer or repair shop might install. Here's a chart for system capacity.

However, modern AC systems are designed to use a finite amount of refrigerant and compressor oil. When leak detection dye is used once, maybe no harm. However, that volume can increase when used repeatedly, and that will eventually reduce the effective volume for refrigerant. When you have a borderline AC system as is, why compromise it further? OEM AC vendors like Nippon Denso (they supply most factory AC systems) suggest using electronic detectors for this reason.

In addition, there are some components that are difficult to access to observe leaks with dye (e.g. evaporator, behind the IP, etc.). These locations are more easily detected with an electronic sniffer, but a test location with still ambient air is required to be most effective.

On the customer relations side, there have been cases of dye leaking into the cabin and staining carpeting, upholstery and passenger garments. Usually only visible under a UV light, there have been cases where customers have experienced embarrassing dye stains on expensive garments when partying under UV black lights. Granted, not a common occurrence, but YMMV depending on where you party and the status of the AC system.

Sherwood
Old 10-09-2010, 10:05 AM
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Rennaire experience?

Reviving an old thread here, but has anyone used the full Rennaire system in the Southwest desert environment? What kind of results have you had?
I'm thinking Rennaire this year or Griffith's next year.I would sure like to have reasonably good a/c in my 84 Carrera now, but I'll only spend the money for Rennaire if it works.
Old 06-30-2012, 03:16 PM
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Reviving an old thread here, but has anyone used the full Rennaire system in the Southwest desert environment? What kind of results have you had?
I'm thinking Rennaire this year or Griffith's next year.I would sure like to have reasonably good a/c in my 84 Carrera now, but I'll only spend the money for Rennaire if it works.
Yup, full System II with desert duty front condensor with R134a. Been running it for about 6 years now & it works just fine. Vent temps when it's below 100 ambient are in the mid/upper 30's when ambient temps hit 105+ vent temps are low 60s.

I also added a fan to front fender oil cooler, it makes a big difference with engine temps when the AC is running.

A couple things I still plan to do - one of these days - is add Griffiths variable speed fan controller and upgraded evaporator blower motor. Something to consider when you've got it torn apart.
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:16 PM
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I did the full monty Retro Air kit and I've been pleased. It keeps the stock front condenser but replaces the rear decklid condenser with a PFC unit. I also went with the upgraded blower motor wich makes a big difference.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:45 PM
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RG,

I have the Griffiths front condensor and new Evap unit with the faster fan unit. Along with new hoses, dryer and so on it works pretty well but I ran out of $$ so did not do the new rear condensor, but this will be done sometime this fall/winter.

Biggest thing is to put new hoses and dryer on the puppy and IMHO the new Evap unit really helps as well.
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Old 08-18-2012, 08:22 AM
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