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Smile Flank's 71 Targa restro - Home made chasis jig - pictures

Hi all, to continue, I wanted to show you the tool (jig) I made to help align the full front suspension pan installation. First, here is a picture of the finished product. Here you'll see that the suspension pan is bolted to the tool and all the pieces, including the car, are fitted and held together by 'clecos'.

I started with some drawings sent to me by Cy (Doc & Cy's) that he got from the 1972 shop manual. They showed all of the chasis dimensions based on a datum line that ran through the middle of the car. Since I work in AutoCad, I was able to make a drawing of these dimensions. Making a layout of the dimensions in a plan view (from above) was easy. For the side dimensions, I layed everything out based on the datum. When I was done, I could move the datum line down (to what would be the top of the tool) then take new dimensions for the height of the post that you see in the pictures. The following pictures were taken during the construction so there are pieces missing at first.


In order to get the car to go up and down over this 'tool', I made a spreader bar that attached to a hand winch. Cables attached to the front shock mounts and at the rear they attached to where the shoulder straps mount.
At a local scrap yard, I found this BA beam that came out of a building. It was 18"tall and had a 12" 'c' channel welded to the top of it. Also it was 30' long. From both ends, I measured in 14' and cut.

I took the 2 foot piece that was left over and sandwiched it in below where the torsion tube would be. At the front of the tool I added the plate (see next photo) this held everything together. The tool is now 14' X 36".

To get everything level, I used a water level, this is a long length of clear hose that has water with food coloring added. If you take your time, these are very accurate. Also I made sure the tool was squared, then I added the straight edge, that you can see in the picture that shows the heavy plate. From the straight edge, I can measure back and start to layout the locations from my Cad drawings. The same with locating the mounting post. From my aircraft and manufacturing days I am really good at doing layouts, and I would be so anal about getting these dimensions and locations just right, that it took six months just to make this tool.


and



Nearing completion, you can see that I added 'sliding post' that had 'jacking plates' added to the tops of them. These slid into the jacking receiver of the car and the other end bolted to the floor. A real poor mans car lift, by using the overhead winch.
The little rods that you see at the front under the 'A' arm mounts were only for locating the steel end caps that the factory uses to protect the front of the 'A' arms. Once located, I removed those rods.


and



Finally done, I put the suspension pan on for a trial fit. Both the pan and the one still on the car fit down onto it like it should. Not shown in the picture, but to attach the suspension pan to the tool, I cut a rectangular window into the side of the post. This way I could reach in with my fingers and bolt the pan down to the tool. I put rags into the opening to catch the hardware as I dropped them, this made retrival easier.



Here is a picture of all the parts going into this repair.



Anyone starting to assemble the parts needed are going to have fun trying to find a full front suspension pan. I had a hard time and finally my buddy Cy came through again, by taking a full floor pan that he had been saving and from it he cut off the suspension pan portion from the rest of the floor pan.
In the next post, I show you all how the repair turned out. If you want to go back and see any of the other work I did, here is a link to the last thread. Flank's 71 Targa restro - inner fender repalcement Happy reading.

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Old 06-13-2005, 12:33 PM
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Wowsers.... that looks HEAVY DUTY man!
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Old 06-13-2005, 12:43 PM
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Fray, The total weight of the tool was close to 2,000 lbs.
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Old 06-13-2005, 01:06 PM
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that is some of the best work i've ever seen

where did you get the suspention support plates the little ones in the photo?
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Old 06-13-2005, 01:17 PM
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Classic, Thanks for the nice comment! Just about all the parts I got from Doc & Cy's, who unfortunently are out of buisness. All of the parts are factory replacements that are still available from either Stoddards or AJ USA. But the full sized front suspension pans I believe are no longer available. Somebody does make a repro of a 'half longitudnal', but I would avoid it because it's not made very well and it's not as strong as the full length ones.
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Old 06-13-2005, 01:29 PM
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Now that is very nice...another one is saved
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Old 06-13-2005, 01:33 PM
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Thanks flank yeah the pan is good with only some minor surface rust on the left hand side, but the small tie piece that goes between the rear two bolts needs replacing.
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Old 06-13-2005, 02:02 PM
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Old 06-13-2005, 02:18 PM
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Man, that thing makes a Celette look like an Erector Set. I've been through all this at the beginnig of the year. I thought I was taking pains to get it right. In the final analysis, I think (I know) I was off a hair. Within the range of being corner balanced, but nevertheless, still off. You, sir, are going to redefine the manufacturing of the 911 in terms of accuracy.
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Old 06-13-2005, 02:56 PM
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Zeke, Hey man, No I think the Celette sets the standard. But my total cost for building this tool was under $500. The tool you'll like is the rotiserie, as soon as I find were I left the pictures, I'll post them.
If anyone wants some help to make a similar jig like this, or can honestly use the one I got. I could let you borrow it. But it's heavy!
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Old 06-14-2005, 02:55 PM
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Honestly man?, I bow before you. I think of myself as a "car guy" and always have.....but I am unfit to carry your jackstrap. Now THAT is being a car guy. Talk about technical ability. I am speechless. I hope your car turns out awesome.....hell it's off to a great start. A VERY big congrats on some fine work that sets a standard. Regards, Dan
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:54 PM
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Good gracious.

That is just... I don't know what to say.

Every picture just adds to the awe. Kneeling...

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Old 06-14-2005, 06:18 PM
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Flank,
You are an artist and a craftsman!!!
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Old 06-14-2005, 06:46 PM
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Old 06-15-2005, 08:26 AM
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Hi all, Since I can't find the pictures of the finished suspension pan installation, nor of the rotiserie, I'll take new pictures this weekend. In the meantime, I thought I'd send you the factory drawings and their 'check' dimensions. These are what I used to base this 911 chasis jig on. The drawings are for 1972 and on, since my car is a 71, the only difference is in the distance of the rear upper shock mounts. I didn't need these to make the jig.

The 'check' dimensions,



Here are two drawings, the first is the factory original.


I took that drawing and used 'write-out' and replaced the metric dimensions for english standard.


Then in AutoCad, I made the drawings for the tool. This is based on making one 14' x 36". All of the front suspension location points land in this 36" wide area. If you need to use this tool for a rear torsion tube installation or other work outside of the 36", you'll need to add 'wings' to the sides.


and


and the front plate.


If any of you all want to make one of these, or if you live in Florida and are nearing a point that you could use this one, let me know.
Thanks.
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Old 06-16-2005, 11:18 AM
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I'm replacing the front half of my suspension pan on my '70 T and after looking at what you are doing I feel totally amateur! I am one to do thing as right as humanly possible the first time and be done. Don't get me wrong here...but do you really have to go to that extent to get it right? Maybe its trickery with the full suspension pan? When doing the front half of the pan the thing is pretty much self aligning or am I missing something? (I think John Walker even summed it up that way also). A really impressive piece of work! I hope you have a few more projects stored away so you can utilize the thing a few more times!
Old 06-29-2005, 02:13 PM
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Don't kid yourself. The pan has to be aligned properly. You may not have to put it on a bench to get it within spec, but you have to take *lots" of measures otherwise to ensure proper installation. This is not a piece to slap in and weld as I have seen some do.
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Old 06-29-2005, 02:21 PM
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Flank, by the looks of your picture of your replacement panels, it looks like your drivers side lateral gas tank support is one for '74-'89. The early lateral gas support runs perfect straight across the bottom of the battery box, yours has a curve outward like the later model lat. tank support. Just thought I'd give you a heads up!
Old 06-29-2005, 06:13 PM
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Bill,
Sharp eyes you've got. The replacement drivers side (US) longitudnal has that curved piece added to the panel. If you are using it on an earlier car, you can remove the spot welds and take the 'extension' off. But you still have to make a filler piece, I used a butt weld and sanded the top smooth, so you can't really see the filler piece.
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Old 06-30-2005, 04:28 AM
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Flank,
I just purchased the front half of the drivers side lateral gas tank support last Saturday at the PCA Parade swap. I purchased it from Stoddard's and it's a reproducton replacement panel they mfg. or have someone mfg. The part is listed as SIC.501.023.00
Lateral fuel tank support reproduction left 1965-1968. It looks fairly decent, the only difference I see between it and one for '69-'73 is where it attaches under the battery box it a straight flush piece and no outward projection. You stated "Somebody does make a repro of a 'half longitudnal', but I would avoid it because it's not made very well and it's not as strong as the full length ones" is this the one you are referring too?
I'm going to modify the flange were it attaches under the battery box, shouldn't be able to tell the difference when I'm done...$65 vs. $300 for the full piece (911.501.953.00GRV). As I only need the front 18 inches. Your jig looks awesome!

Old 06-30-2005, 08:52 AM
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