Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > Porsche 911 Technical Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Registered User
 
}{arlequin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DC/Boston
Posts: 5,502
Garage
front wheel bearing install?

I'm about to get into replacing the front bearings, and I'm not sure what to expect. Normally, the outside bearing just falls out on its own, usually when removing hubs/rotors. How about the inner bearing? Is it a press fit that requires a bearing puller? Hot/cold method to install? What about bearing seals?

thanks
__________________
dave
1973,5: one two thweeee!
no.don't.stop.
Old 09-15-2005, 08:21 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
Friend of Warren
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Jefferson City, MO
Posts: 15,522
Both of the races will need some assistance to install and remove. The purists will claim that you will need to use a press or freeze the races and heat the hub. I just hammer them in and out with no ill effects.
__________________
Kurt
2003 Boxster S, 1991 BMW 318is
'93 Ducati 900SS, '76 BMW R75/6, '73 350 Honda Scrambler, 2003 SV650 Track bike

Gone, but not forgotten: '86 Carrera, '72 911E, 2001 Boxster
Old 09-15-2005, 08:31 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Par911's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: DMV
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally posted by Kurt V
Both of the races will need some assistance to install and remove. The purists will claim that you will need to use a press or freeze the races and heat the hub. I just hammer them in and out with no ill effects.
What Kurt said, I just hammered my new races into the hubs last week.
Old 09-15-2005, 09:11 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Grady Clay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Arapahoe County, Colorado, USA
Posts: 9,032
Dave,

This project is conspicuous by its absence from 101_Projects.

Be very careful with the metal brake pipes. Always use two flare-nut wrenches and lots of penetrating solvent.

First off, keep the bearings associated with where they were installed if you are going to reuse them.

The inner (larger) bearing is held captive by the wheel bearing seal. Don’t forget to install the bearing before installing the new seal.

When removing the outer bearing races that are pressed into the hub, use a large pin punch ground at a slight angle and go in from the opposite side of the hub. Be careful to not nick the bore of the hub where the bearing goes. If you do, remove any raised areas before installing the bearing outer races.

Later hubs have a notch cast in them to fully accept a puller. I see nothing wrong with duplicating that with a Drimmel.

An often neglected part of this service is the seal race. It is pressed on the spindle and has a very thin O-ring seal between the seal race and the spindle. You should replace the O-rings.

When you have the seal race off the spindle, carefully inspect the root of the spindle for damage or corrosion. You can usually buff this surface to a fine finish. Coat the spindle with grease including under and behind the seal race. You can have the seal race slide on when hot (100C). You want a slight swipe of grease on the new seal lip and the race.

I prefer the heat-the-hub & freeze-the-bearing race approach. I still use a hammer to seat the race in the bore of the hub. Never use the wheel bearing adjustment to pull the race in place. I coat the bore of the hub with grease also.

Even with new bearings, I clean them and lube with my grease. This allows you to inspect the new parts and insures nothing foreign from the manufacture or assembly is in the bearing. Fill the areas between the rollers with grease.

After cleaning, grease the thrust washers, adjusting nuts, pinch bolts and grease caps – particularly inside the cap. Check the condition of the pinch bolt, particularly the internal hex. Note the proper orientation of the adjusting nut.

The bearings should be adjusted with a little clearance, not tight. You should be able to feel it when the tire & wheel is mounted.

When reinstalling brake pipes, push the hex fitting back from the flare and grease the space between the nut and the pipe. Grease the threads also. Don’t get grease in the brake fluid area.

It is good practice to take some medium grit sandpaper and scuff the rotors and pads. Clean the rotors with brake-clean last thing before you install the calipers. Make sure the pads are clean and free to move. “While you are there” cycle the pistons in the calipers. Remember to put the calipers back on the correct side – bleeders up.

This is a good opportunity to clean the wheel studs and lug nuts. The nuts should spin all the way on with no resistance. I put a pretense of grease on the lug nut ball the wheel stud threads. Remember to torque the wheels and check the tire pressure.

Pump/test the brakes before driving.

It is good practice to check the adjustment and caliper bolt torque after a few weeks of driving.

Best,
Grady
__________________
ANSWER PRICE LIST (as seen in someone's shop)
Answers - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - $0.75
Answers (requiring thought) - - - - $1.25
Answers (correct) - - - - - - - - - - $12.50
Old 09-15-2005, 10:25 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
MBruns for President
 
JeremyD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: St. Pete, FL
Posts: 14,854
Garage
As always - Grady rocks -

Let me please add just a few suggesstions. #1 your outside bbq with a internal thermometer makes a great "oven" to heat up the hubs. More likely won't get you in trouble with the wifey. 100+ degrees can be enough. Wear goves, oven mits (be careful with the grease again!) Do your banging close to the grill - the hubs cool down rapidly.

Stick your races - seperate the bearings from the races and number them - or keep them grouped - labeled - whatever - stick them in the freezer. If you don't seperate the bearings from the freezer and live in a humid location, condensation will form in the worst place - in the bearing when you pull them out.

Heating/cooling can make all the difference in getting them in/out.
__________________
Current Whip: - 2003 996 Twin Turbo - 39K miles - Lapis Blue/Grey
Past: 1974 IROC (3.6) , 1987 Cabriolet (3.4) , 1990 C2 Targa, 1989 S2
Old 09-15-2005, 10:35 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Rick Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Cave Creek, AZ USA
Posts: 38,311
Garage
Dave, I just removed my hubs and had Pari drop them off at that bearing shop in G-burg. It's was around $40 for them to R&R the new races.
__________________
2015 BMW S1000R
2017 BMW 330ix wagon
Old 09-15-2005, 10:36 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #6 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
Par911's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: DMV
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally posted by Rick Lee
Dave, I just removed my hubs and had Pari drop them off at that bearing shop in G-burg. It's was around $40 for them to R&R the new races.
Yeah Dave, if you want I can do that for you too. It's right up the street from my place. Let me know.
Old 09-15-2005, 10:44 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Breeang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Orlando, FL.
Posts: 255
Bump
__________________
1957 KR 200 Messerschmitt Bubble Car 3 wheeler-my first rear engined air cooled German car,alas long gone!.
1977 911S 2.7 to spend money on
2006 Tundra for acting grownup
Old 09-15-2005, 10:48 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
}{arlequin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DC/Boston
Posts: 5,502
Garage
Grady,
LOL, I'm laughing b/c of the wealth of info that I just inhaled!
Thank you for a great thorough "checklist" of what else I should be mindful of.


Quote:
Originally posted by Grady Clay
An often neglected part of this service is the seal race. It is pressed on the spindle and has a very thin O-ring seal between the seal race and the spindle. You should replace the O-rings.

When you have the seal race off the spindle, carefully inspect the root of the spindle for damage or corrosion. You can usually buff this surface to a fine finish. Coat the spindle with grease including under and behind the seal race. You can have the seal race slide on when hot (100C). You want a slight swipe of grease on the new seal lip and the race.
I'm not sure I ever saw any race on my spindle when I had it apart in the past but I'll check.

For reference, is this what I'm supposed to have on the spindle?
(on spindle from the yellow strut)



thanks again.
__________________
dave
1973,5: one two thweeee!
no.don't.stop.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:23 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #9 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Par911's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: DMV
Posts: 1,431
Yes Dave, the one on the yellow strut is the seal race that Grady is talking about.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:48 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #10 (permalink)
Registered User
 
911SCfanatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: N. of Detroit
Posts: 1,882
Garage
yes, that piece is what the seal rides on.
question: how easy is it to get that off?
__________________
Bill G.

'68 911 Ossi Blue coupe
Old 09-15-2005, 11:49 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #11 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Par911's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: DMV
Posts: 1,431
It's not that hard Bill, I used a hammer and a chisel to tap off my old seal races once the strut/spindle was off the car.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:51 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #12 (permalink)
Bandwidth AbUser
 
Jim Richards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: SoCal
Posts: 28,227
Not bad, I did this when I bought a set of used 3.5" ear'ed struts for the purple car so that I could run S-calipers. And, I replaced the o-rings in question.
__________________
Jim R.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #13 (permalink)
Registered User
 
}{arlequin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DC/Boston
Posts: 5,502
Garage
i've gotta do more inventory, when i ordered bearing seals, I'm not sure if this is what arrived. If I don't have them on my car currently, should I be installing them on the new struts?
__________________
dave
1973,5: one two thweeee!
no.don't.stop.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #14 (permalink)
Registered User
 
}{arlequin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DC/Boston
Posts: 5,502
Garage
not sure if i even have the o'rings, any idea what they are called or should i just search for "wheel bearing race seal o'rings"
__________________
dave
1973,5: one two thweeee!
no.don't.stop.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:56 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #15 (permalink)
Bandwidth AbUser
 
Jim Richards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: SoCal
Posts: 28,227
I'd be concerned if you didn't have them on your car now. But then, you typically only subject your front wheels to half the stress as compared to most others.

__________________
Jim R.
Old 09-15-2005, 11:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #16 (permalink)
Registered User
 
}{arlequin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: DC/Boston
Posts: 5,502
Garage
it's funny, you read along w/ all the technical posts and see the pics, and it all clicks and makes sense

then when it comes time for you to do it, all of a sudden i turn stupid and the simplest task requires explanation LOL
__________________
dave
1973,5: one two thweeee!
no.don't.stop.
Old 09-15-2005, 12:14 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #17 (permalink)
Registered User
 
zotman72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Centennial, CO, USA
Posts: 1,405
This is Grady here. I'm at Bill's house. We just got his PCA
Club Racer running for the DE tomorrow and the Club Race at Pueblo this weekend.

While he was tinkering, I looked in his Bentley and others. None even mention the seal race and O-ring!

A scarey thing is that it is possible to install the hub with the seal race missing. Of course the bearng doesn't seat properly and some combinations the rotor rubs one side of the caliper. I have seen cars drive in this way. Too many times the seal race is thrown away with the old strut and not have a new one installed.

You can see the spindle radii I am talking about. Those need to be free of damage or corrosion.

Dave, when I go through one of these discussions I try and cover every little detail. There are many who lurk who are much less knowledgable. I just wish they would ask questions.


Oops, got to go do some adjusting.

Best,
Grady
__________________
Bill
'72 911T-2.4S MFI Vintage Racer(heart out), '80 911SC Weissach,'95.5 S6 Avant Wunderwagen & 2005 997 C2S new ride.
Old 09-15-2005, 03:34 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #18 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Montgomery, AL
Posts: 686
Is it possible to get the seal race off the spindle without removing the strut?

Steve B

72 911T
__________________
Steve B.

1972 911t
1999 328is
Old 09-15-2005, 07:12 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #19 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Darnestown, Maryland
Posts: 913
Pari would knowabout that. My guess is that it would come off.
You could heat it to break it loose, but that would probably ruin the o-ring. Someonementioned to me once that these seal races are like $45.

Dave I have a bearing race install tool which also works for the seals. It's taper matches the inside of the bearing race and it helps you drive it in straight. If you put the race in the freezer,mine when it with just some light taps.
Its yours when you want to barrow it.
__________________
Bill Miller
81 Targa Guards Red
3.6, M&K 1 out, S4 brakes
83 ROW CAB Rubinrot Metallic (RIP)
Old 09-15-2005, 07:48 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #20 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:57 AM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.