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I need help on my oil lines

ok, I've been soaking these things for about a week and today I figured I'd see if I could get the oil ine from the engine to the therostate loosened - the engine side.

However, no can do. I have a 15" cresent wrench and a 12" cresent wrench on these things and they arn't budging.

I've read to heat the nuts, but I'm not sure Im a fan of that. Then I've heard to dremel the nut.

I've researched the dremel thing but I'm still unclear on exactly how to go about this.

first: what kind of bit do I need?
two: how deep do I need to cut into the nut?
three: once I have achieve the depth, what tool do I use then?
four: would I be better off cutting off the brass tube up to the nut and using a deep socket to remove the nut?

Any help would be greatful.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:11 PM
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What have you been soaking with? Hopefully a "true" penetrant like PB Blaster or the like (WD40 or aerosol oils ain't good for this). Have you also tried heating up the nut part? Buy a propane torch at your local Home Depot (about $12) and apply some heat. But be careful as the penetrant IS flammable. That, along with the PB should do it.

Edward
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:20 PM
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If you cut the nut....then you have problems with the line when you put in a new thermostat.....I assume that's what the purpose is....

Or are you replacing the lines????

Heat and a crescent/vice grips WILL work but can be cumbersome....the proper sized open end wrenches are better. Porsche actually makes a set FOR this purpose.....I have used thin Bicycle Wrenches....30mm and 36mm if my memory is correct.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:20 PM
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I just did this.
Use the dremel cutting wheel. Cut carefully at 90 degrees/perpendicular to the nut. You want to cut in to the threads as little as possible, some can not be avoided. Once you split the nut, a cresent will back it off easily. I didn't even bother trying anything else after reading the threads. It went easy.
If you cut the oil line & use a socket, you still have to support the t-stat and I understand it's easy to take the threaded part of the t-stat with the nut, it's aluminum.
I did use some plumbers silicon since I cut in to the threads some. Leaks not a drop. I did both lines, looks good.

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Old 01-22-2006, 02:35 PM
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I have been using PB Blaster, and that is why I was hesitant to use heat.

I have the 36" oil line wrench on order, but I have little hope is will give me the leverage I will need to break the bolt. If 15" cresent wont budge it I dought the speacial tool will do the job (but we will see) if it isn't longer.

Im replacing the lines not the thermostat. I have replacment lines of course. It seems to me if I cut the nut down far enough and wedge somthing in the cut it might pry the nut apart and thereby breaking the threads loose. Im just not sure how far to cut and with what.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:38 PM
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I bought the wrench when I ordered the lines. I don't get how you're supposed to use it at the t-stat. There's no room to do any good.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pat Crellin
I bought the wrench when I ordered the lines. I don't get how you're supposed to use it at the t-stat. There's no room to do any good.
So you cant get to either line?
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:46 PM
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You're on the right track with trying to split the nut. The dremel work isn't to totally release the nut it's to cut a groove almost to the major diameter on the t-stat threads and then with a chisel you split the oil line nut open. It has to have a wide angle wedge tip. If you use something liek a screwdriver it will just plunge into the t-stat threads before you split the nut.

If you can get the other end of the oil lines off (the hard lines) then you may find it easier to pull out the t-stat with the soft lines and work on it separate from the car.

Wait until your new lines come in and you'll be able to measure how deep to make the cut.
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Old 01-22-2006, 03:01 PM
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You can get it on the nut but there's no room to move it. Unless I'm missing something. I used it on the engine & maybe oil tank ends just because I had paid good money for it. Everybody says to buy bicycle wrenches. Maybe I should get a bicycle & find something to turn.
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Old 01-22-2006, 03:02 PM
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Having recently completed the removal of the complete oil cooling system to renew the flexible pipes and clean up the lines and the 'stat, I found the least destructive and effective method was to use heat. I bought myself a small propane torch (actually a really small one - the type chefs use to brown off a merangue, refils with lighter fluid). First I heated the area with a heat gun, then concentrated the flame from the torch on the nut. It worked everytime without fuss. When I tackled the front wheel bearings, heat was (and is recommended as) the ONLY solution for a stress free job!! (IMHO of course) The 36,32 and 30mm Wrenches I purchased also proved invaluable.

Andre
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Old 01-22-2006, 03:03 PM
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Wow, different opinions on how to do the same job, go figure.
I don't disagree on any of the approaches though I don't use heat around flammables myself. Taking it all off and working on a bench may be the best.
By cutting the nuts with a dremel, the whole job including oil took me about 45 minutes.

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Old 01-22-2006, 03:16 PM
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Oil Lines Removal.....

Redcoupe,

Done this oil lines removal recently and I agree with Pat C's recommendation of taking them off and working on a bench. You'll have more room and leverage to dismantle the oil lines to the thermostat. Having the right tools make a big difference. Just my two-cents.

Tony

Last edited by boyt911sc; 10-13-2006 at 08:20 PM..
Old 01-22-2006, 04:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by chrisp
You're on the right track with trying to split the nut. The dremel work isn't to totally release the nut it's to cut a groove almost to the major diameter on the t-stat threads and then with a chisel you split the oil line nut open. It has to have a wide angle wedge tip. If you use something liek a screwdriver it will just plunge into the t-stat threads before you split the nut.

If you can get the other end of the oil lines off (the hard lines) then you may find it easier to pull out the t-stat with the soft lines and work on it separate from the car.

Wait until your new lines come in and you'll be able to measure how deep to make the cut.
are you talking usinga chisel and hammer or a chisel with on impact gun?
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Old 01-22-2006, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by atheophilus
Having recently completed the removal of the complete oil cooling system to renew the flexible pipes and clean up the lines and the 'stat, I found the least destructive and effective method was to use heat. I bought myself a small propane torch (actually a really small one - the type chefs use to brown off a merangue, refils with lighter fluid). First I heated the area with a heat gun, then concentrated the flame from the torch on the nut. It worked everytime without fuss. When I tackled the front wheel bearings, heat was (and is recommended as) the ONLY solution for a stress free job!! (IMHO of course) The 36,32 and 30mm Wrenches I purchased also proved invaluable.

Andre
how long did you heat the nut and how many cycles of cool and hot did you go through before turning the nut with the wrench?
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Old 01-22-2006, 04:38 PM
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What is the smaller nut size where the oil line meets the engine line. I know the oil line is 36mm but what is the small nut 31mm or 30mm?
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:02 PM
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30....there are some 27mm someplace, if I recall correctly....
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:14 PM
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Oil lines are pretty expensive. T-stats moreso. I used heat and PB. It's smokey. I held the t-stat with a giant crescent wrench on the flats and then used a BA pipe wrench to get the nuts off the t-stat. The nuts broke free on one with no thread damage the other had slight thread damage. I made sure that the galled threads inside the steel nuts were cleared out of aluminum from the t-stat. I used a dental pick. The threads are fine.The aluminum came out like wire from the inner threads. After I cleaned them, I made sure that they would hand thread easily with gentle force up to the hilt. The nuts are strong and the marks from the pipe wrench were nil. I dressed them down. After I set all of the lines in place, I dissasembled the pieces and applied anti sieze to all the threads inside and out. No leaks and they torqued down tight without that horrible stripped thread feeling. If the threads on your t-stat gall there are sleeves to fix it with the remaining threads.

Try heat and leverage with a fire extinguisher in reach.
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:48 PM
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Just usinga dremel on the nuts to get them to the major diameter of the threads may well weaken them enough to allow them to break. Get yourself a little propane torch though; they're cheap and SO useful...

ianc
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Old 01-22-2006, 08:42 PM
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I say dremmel, I did this a few months back and tried most methods then bought a dremmel.

The threads dont create the seal, its the olive type thing that does that so its doesnt matter too much if you nick the threads a bit.

I dremmeled through the flat part of the nut in line with the line and if you are carefull and do it a small bit at a time once you think you are close you will see the tips of the alloy thermostat threads as they are a diff colour to the steel nut. Once you see the threads I used a BIG screwdriver in the slot and twisted it to open up the nut - it then wids off really easily. (twisting a big screwdriver means you dont burry a chisel into the threads)

Once you have done one you get tthe chance to examine it and make a better job of the next one, first one took me severla hours and the last one took maybe 10 mins.

good luck
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Old 01-23-2006, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by redcoupe86
how long did you heat the nut and how many cycles of cool and hot did you go through before turning the nut with the wrench?
I inadvertantly went through maybe two/three cycles, but this was probably more down to interruptions rather than intentional. Heat gun for maybe 10 mins then only another 5 or so with the torch. From the front to the back the smaller of the nuts varies between 30 and 32mm. I just attached the front cooler to the pipes (with the flexi's) and the cooler has 32mm and the pipes 30. I think the larger size is always on the nut. As I did the whole lot front to back, I cut the flexible hoses so I could remove as much as I could before attempting to undo anything, but still had to undo the regulator and rear most connectors in situ. Also I bought some of the Optimoly paste Porsche recommend you apply before reassembly, to help me or future owners in the event that they need coming off again. I really could not budge the connectors even off the car and with daily soaking with a penetrating fluid. It was only when I used the heat that they came apart, and then with a fair bit of force. (And I am no wimp!). I made sure I had all three wrenches before I began the job as I didnt want to risk any slipping or damage. Worked well for me. Good luck!
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Old 01-23-2006, 02:19 AM
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