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Repairing broken exhaust studs using my drill fixture.

bell and I had a fun day today working on his engine and my car. I've been having electical trouble so he worked on that while I used one of my tools to drill out and replace his broken, rusty exhaust studs. Here's a pic of the burnt up wires bell found wrapped around the shifter in my tunnel.



He was able to fix all that as well as rewire a bunch of stuff the PO screwed up. I've also got working lights for the gauges as half of the bulbs where burnt out. Here are some pics of the progress on his exhaust studs.

First I cut and ground one stud flush using a dremel with a fiber disk.



Making sure the exhaust flange was clear of debris I fitted the proper port disk to the tool and tapped the tool into place, then drilling commenced. I used low speed with lots of oil and pressure.



After drilling and blowing off with compressed air I removed the tool. Then using a jewel's screw driver I removed the threads.





About half the holes the threads came out in a spiral, on one I had to dig a little harder, the rest must have would up on the bit when I punched through the bottom of the stud. After one hole was done I installed a new stud and then drilled out the other one. Here's a picture of one side of the engine done.



By the time I got to the last hole my arms where getting tired so bell drilled that one.



I should note that on the first hole the bit caught on the bottom of the stud and snapped off above the tool. We where able to unscrew it with pliers and carry on. Twelve holes and 6 hours later all the studs where done. Using low speed and pushing hard on the drill the second drill bit finished the job and it's still sharp! The key here guys is pressure on the bit, oil and low speed, you're looking for spirals or big chips. Here's all the studs installed.




bell needs to remove the studs and put some removable locktite or anti-sieze on the threads, I installed the studs temporarily to keep chips and dirt out of the threads. I chased all the threads with a thread chasing die. When we where done we blew the motor off real well with compressed air then flipped it over on the engine stand so we could pull the paper towels out of the ports without chips falling in. Don't have to worry about this when doing it with the engine in the car. It's also easier to push up on a drill from under the car than it is to push down with the engine on a stand. This last pic is the top of the partially stripped motor showing the port blockoff plates I made so bell could pressure wash the grime off the motor. I made 12 to cover both the intake and exhaust, the stud spacing is the same.



While I'm sure bell is happy to have his exhaust studs replaced I can't thank him enough for fixing the mess of wiring I had in my car. It's a wonder the darn thing never went up in flames. I've informed him he's doing the wiring on the '73 which I'd be starting on mid August. Having done one stud on my car and a few on my bench heads this was the first time I used the tool to do all the studs and I was very happy with how it perfomed. I found a couple of areas I might modify slightly as the clearance to the fins near the cam tower is tight and the 3/8 tapped hole I put in the tool body needs to be moved closer to the tool center. I use this hole with a long bolt to wiggle the tool out of the port as it's a tight fit. I also found that the best results occured when I completely cleaned up the port face so the tool can sit perfectly flat.

Well that was enough work for one day, tommorrow I go for a nice long drive after work while the CNC makes more tool bodies.

-Christian
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Email me about 911 exhaust stud repair tools, rsr911@neo.rr.com
1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!

Last edited by A Quiet Boom; 06-26-2006 at 02:59 PM..
Old 06-25-2006, 07:59 PM
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Are you using a LH bit in that nice Harbor Freight drill motor? (I have one like it and I use it more than my Milwaukee or Bosch.)
Old 06-25-2006, 08:17 PM
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Actually it's a standard black oxide coated bit in a Black and Decker keyless (worthless) chuck drill motor. A lefthand bit is won't work because the tool is drilling out the core of the stud leaving only the threads behind. We started out trying to weld nuts onto one of the studs and heating it cherry red but it just broke off. It was quicker and easier to just drill them. I brought along a second tool body with a bushing large enough for a bit for time cert taps but didn't need it since all of threads came out rather easily. The fifth picture down shows the threads spiralling out of the hole. I apologize for the poor photo quality, my digicam is broke and I had to use my camera phone.
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1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!
Old 06-25-2006, 08:28 PM
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a big thanks goes out to christian, replacing studs was not something i was looking forward to doing myself.
and if you look at the wiring mess we pulled from his 911 you'll see that one of the 10 ga. wires is missing about 24" of it's protective cover.....and it was hot, the wires were from a PO which had wired in an amperage meter.....when that failed it melted the 2 10ga wires together along with some others. scary stuff.....please make sure everything is fused people

here's a pic of the stud removal tool bolted to the port, very slick piece, as long as the correct port adapted is used and bolted down you're golden, i can now see the advantages

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Old 06-25-2006, 09:34 PM
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how did your break 'em?

Christian,

How did you manage to break off the exhaust studs in the first place? Did you try to remove them without cherry redding them?
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Old 06-26-2006, 03:47 AM
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we used 2 nuts locked together the heated them until they were glowing.....they just snapped. we then used my dremel to cut them flush with the head, it must be cut flush for the tool to work properly.
my engine has 100k+ and they were the original studs, the threads were pretty much gone on most of them.
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Old 06-26-2006, 06:36 AM
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and i also have my newly rebuilt 915 ready to go back in......$1300 rebuild, new sliders, syncros, bands, etc etc
i'll be on the road VERY soon



christian.....maybe re-title the thread so people will better see your stud tool performance.
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Old 06-26-2006, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by bell


christian.....maybe re-title the thread so people will better see your stud tool performance.
It won't let me change the title but I do want people to see how well this works. We repaired 12 studs in far less time and less money than it would have cost to tear down the motor and machine the studs out on a mill. How fast do you figure you can R&R the engine as well as the heads? Then there's machine shop time, I'd probably charge $40 per hour to drill out studs on my manual mill. Figure at least 3-4 hours to drill all the studs and pick out all the threads using a mill. Now you need a gasket set, retime the cams, set the lash and put it all back together. Six hours with a break for lunch and several smoke breaks to do all 12 studs is pretty darn good I think. Besides it's actually easier to do the the engine in the car since chips and debris won't fall into the ports and you can use the floor to push against while drilling.
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Email me about 911 exhaust stud repair tools, rsr911@neo.rr.com
1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!

Last edited by A Quiet Boom; 06-26-2006 at 03:09 PM..
Old 06-26-2006, 03:07 PM
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i'll work off my bill with your race car....and at your new house/garage when ready
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Old 06-26-2006, 03:45 PM
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Great job, that's alot of hard work! I hate exhaust studs!!
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Old 06-26-2006, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by bell
i'll work off my bill with your race car....and at your new house/garage when ready

LOL,

No bill but I will appreciate the help.

I made 3 more tool bodies tonight, darn things take awhile even on a CNC. I need to add a couple more flood coolant nozzles to flush the chips away better so I can run the feed rate faster. I also started work on that hood pin to replace my broken latch. Someday I'll get enough free time to finish up my programming for the watershields. Oh and I fixed the fan housing, wish I'd known about that pin when I put it together the first time.
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1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!
Old 06-26-2006, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by azasadny
Great job, that's alot of hard work! I hate exhaust studs!!
Actually it went rather easy, well as easy as drilling through 7-9 inches of steel can be with a hand held drill (12 studs times 5/8-3/4 inch depth in the head). The neat thing is when what's left of the steel threads get caught by the bit and don't have to be picked out. On the others I "rolled" the threads out using a jeweler's screwdriver.

On a similar note I've had requests for a 3.6 tool but they are different from the earlier heads and don't have a nice round and consistent port for a disk to locate in. They do have an O-ring groove that I could locate the tool with but I don't have a head to play with. Anyone have a scrap 3.6 head they want to part with?
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Email me about 911 exhaust stud repair tools, rsr911@neo.rr.com
1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!
Old 06-27-2006, 11:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by bell
we then used my dremel to cut them flush with the head, it must be cut flush for the tool to work properly.

Do breaks occur below the surface on an angle? If so what options are available?

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Last edited by RickM; 10-12-2006 at 10:18 AM..
Old 10-12-2006, 06:51 AM
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the tool doesn't care. it just drills them out.
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Old 10-12-2006, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by john walker's workshop
the tool doesn't care. it just drills them out.

Yep!

The hardened bushing guides the bit right down the center regardless of what the break looks like.
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Email me about 911 exhaust stud repair tools, rsr911@neo.rr.com
1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!
Old 10-12-2006, 09:24 AM
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Great bootstrap effort on the studs! What a pain - I've done that on shock bolts before and it is just a matter of lots of drilling, oil and sore muscles. Very low-tech, high effort repair. I read in Wayne's book about the electric arc coring machine used to remove broken studs but this method is well-suited to the average DIY Porsche guy. Thanks for showing us a different way to skin that cat.

Regards,
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Old 10-12-2006, 10:08 AM
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how much for the tool and where can you get one (3 liter engine)
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Old 10-12-2006, 11:36 AM
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you can pm christian (a quiet boom), he developed the tool with help from john walker and others on the board to make it the most "user freindly", not sure how much he sells them for but after seeing it work it's a must have when tackling this job.
christian makes these on his cnc machine.
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Old 10-12-2006, 04:32 PM
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IMHO, this tool is worth its weight in gold.
Old 10-12-2006, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by osidak
how much for the tool and where can you get one (3 liter engine)
PM replied to.

I just want to add that I always have these in stock. A tool kit includes the main tool body and 8 port disks that fit into the tool and into the port for proper alignment, I do not include the required 17/64" drill bit as I have to pay full retail for them.
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Email me about 911 exhaust stud repair tools, rsr911@neo.rr.com
1966 912 converted to 3.0 and IROC body SOLD unfortunately
1986 Ford F350 Crew Cab 7.3 IDI diesel, Banks Sidewinder turbo, ZF5 5spd, 4WD Dana 60 king pin front, DRW, pintle hook and receiver hitch, all steel flat bed with gooseneck hidden hitch. Awesome towing capacity!
Old 10-12-2006, 09:18 PM
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