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Zeke's Avatar
 
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What specialty tools are needed that are either NLA or too expensive?

We all know how cool Island's valve adjustment tools is. Besides the MFI protractors I'm working on, what else?

I have a pretty good design for a ball joint gland nut removal tool that would be a 3rd of the price. I might be able to come up with a fender lip roller tool that works off the hub. This is the kind of stuff I'm after, making tools for casual use that can be affordably purchased if only used once or twice.

I don't think I'll be putting a dent in Snap On's business, but if the ideas work out and Wayne is willing, my stuff might be available some day thru Pelican. (I had to say that )

Give me your ideas. Leave the terribly complicated and totally obscure out.
Old 07-05-2006, 02:42 PM
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Don't know where it falls in the terribly complicated or obscure category, but what about a rear wheel bearing puller?

I always hear how they are too pricey for one time use etc.

And I swear, I would LOVE a 12mm allen head socket with ROUNDED corners, you know the kind. I have asked Wayne, he said I shouldn't be working on my suspension. WTF??
I asked Mr. Snap On, no rounded ones after 10 mm.

My wrench let me borrow his for some suspension work and it was VERY nice to have. The rounded aspect allows a less than perfect angle to be used.

that's all my pea brain has to offer

-Chris
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:00 PM
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The tools in this transmission thread:
Need 901 transmission tool sizes

and any others that are needed to work on the 901 & 911 transmissions - obviously the 915 also but not my interest.

The wheel bearing stuff is a good idea.

You may have found a new niche for yourself!
You could call it "Zilt Tools" or Zilt! Tools"
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:26 PM
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the engine yoke
Old 07-05-2006, 03:27 PM
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A front wheel bearing tool should work on the back too. Here is a harbor freight tool that should work or you can make your own:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=45210
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:47 PM
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Something to help in pulling fuel injectors out?
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:49 PM
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The rear wheel bearing puller I use is a BFH and a solid round bar. Now, to put a new one in I use about a foot of 1/2" all thread and some big ass washers. I think they are for an 1-1/4 bolt or something like that. You think people would buy a set up like that?
Old 07-05-2006, 03:59 PM
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I make a tool to drill out broken exhaust studs and I have more than a passing interest to make a similar tool for drilling out headstuds. As with the exhaust tool the headstud tool once designed and prototyped will be priced to reflect it's precision.
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Old 07-05-2006, 04:03 PM
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For rear wheel bearing, I used this tool by Wavey (see last post of this thread)
Rear Wheel Bearing Removal


And here is a 915 input shaft socket UTKarman_Ghia and I made:
The best tools are home-made (915 nut socket)

We are getting royalties here right (kidding of course)

Pat

Last edited by Pat S; 07-05-2006 at 04:22 PM..
Old 07-05-2006, 04:19 PM
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I made this little gadget for drilling head studs, but found I couldn't get enough pressure to drill the head stud material. Had to set up in a mill using carbide concrete bits. I was doing 10 of them I think, but for 1 or 2 it might be okay.

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Old 07-05-2006, 04:27 PM
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Milt,

You could get me started forever on special Porsche tools. PKG (and later PAG) has many special tools for our 911s. I like to think they are solely for a proper job. In fact many manufacturers make the cars with less expensive cost while requiring their dealers (and shops & owners) to buy specialty tools to keep them repaired. Of course our beloved Porsche wouldn’t stoop that low.

Special (job specific) tools are very desirable. In an industrial (workshop) setting they are necessary. The issue is to efficiently accomplish a repair.

With our 911s only an old Dealer or competent independent workshop can afford the special tools. I have been by many where they lament the tools haven’t been used in the past year and more.

What is the solution?

I propose that the Dealers and independents pool the specialized tools in a given geographical area. Have a local LLC that owns the tools and has instructions for use. There are many metro areas in the US where this would work.

Of course PCNA may not want to do this. They get to sell (required) the tools (at a BIG profit) to their Dealers. Never mind that they go unused because few bring their early 911 to the Dealer.

Somewhere there has to be a solution.


Best,
Grady
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Old 07-05-2006, 04:46 PM
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Milt might be able to change the cost issue...

re the LLC (Limited Liability Corp.) that would own the tools... it might work; a small coop might work better - emphasis on small.
The real problem with joint ownership of anything - tools, land, you name it was identified by Garrett Hardin in an essay called "The Tragedy of the Commons." You either have a regulatory authority (govt.) or you have private property. Another famed quote (which I used to have posted on my tool box) is "I make my living with Snap-Off Tools. Please Don't Ask to Borrow Them."

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Another idea, Milt -- some alignment jigs might be cheap and work fine for some time if they were made out of Plexiglass, etc. instead of steel. I'm thinking of a DIYer here - the kind of guy who has no reason to pay extra for a worm drive circular saw type thing...

This means they can't be under much stress for alignment.
Jim Sims alludes to this in the thread I posted above re trans. tools.
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Old 07-05-2006, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Grady Clay



Somewhere there has to be a solution.

Indeed. And the pooling of tools has been discussed over and over. However, I would rather see each person be able to obtain the most popular tools at a cost that makes sense. To me, when a tool is more expensive than taking your car to the shop, then take it to the shop unless you really want that tool.

Not too many of us do our own transmissions, but during the time I have been on this and other boards, I have observed that a lot of folks will tackle their suspension. Especially the 911 and 914 guys. And I think Chuck Moreland could tell us what percentage of his suspension products go to private parties vs. commercial accounts. I'll bet it's significant. So, reliable yet inexpensive specialty tools for this purpose make sense.

There are other areas of the car that fit the same mode. Seems like there are a lot of people that will build a motor at home. So, they have to have some of the tools where the job cannot be done otherwise. One has to weigh the cost of the tools again vs. having someone else do the work. Of course, buying a high quality tool, using it once and then selling it for slightly less than new is a great way to bring the cost of tools way down. However, some you just want to keep as they might come in handy again.

What comes to mind now is the Z block for the dial indicator. Come on, $35 for a piece of aluminum with 2 holes is wrong. (Sorry, Pelican, but it's not your fault, you don't make them, just sell them). Of course I made my own and it did take some time. But, my time is free at this point. Still, I think most of us could come up with an alternative for less than half of that figure.

This type of endeavor is the target.
Old 07-05-2006, 05:28 PM
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I bolted a plate of steel on one of the studs on the head and used a magnetic base, instead of using the z block. There is always another way....
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Old 07-05-2006, 05:32 PM
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I think the ring/pinion depth tool that is no longer avail would be a great tool to make.

It seems so easy for our GREAT HOST to buy or have a fellow pelican make all of these tools for either rent or purchase to us faithful. Why not approach Wayne?
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Old 07-05-2006, 06:10 PM
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As a 944 owner I can completely agree with the cost of the tool VS the cost of a trip to the shop. Price the belt tension gauge (early 944) and the cost of a belt replacement/adjustment...Pretty darn close.
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Old 07-08-2006, 03:43 AM
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I would buy the inexpensive bearing puller rather than mess around making it.
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Old 07-08-2006, 08:43 AM
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Two come to mind quickly:

A 19mm wrench for the bottom nut on the engine carrier that would stay in place by itself while you break or torque the bolt.

A tool to make making and breaking the cam nut on pre-80 engines a legitimate "one man" job. I've done it alone, but have come perilously close to breaking fingers when things didn't stay where they were supposed to.

Regards,
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Old 07-08-2006, 09:50 AM
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