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1982 SC Oil Line replacement

The two thick, black oil lines that run parallel to each other located inside the passenger side rear wheel well are now really starting to leak. They appear to be of a wrapped rubber material with metal fittings on them.

I am writing this to see if there are any pitfalls in doing this job myself. I did replace my alternator last summer, by myself I might add.

As stated above, the car is a 1982 SC with about 86,000 original miles. When I bought the car 4 or 5 years ago, the PPI noted that these lines would need to be replaced down the road. Well I guess it is now down the road. I believe that these lines are the original as I see no records from previous owners.

Both lines run into the thermostat located in the front of the rear wheel well ( can see it easily by looking into the well ) Nothing forward of this thermostat appears to be leaking.

One comes from the oil tank at the rear of the well, and the other is a bit more convoluted in its path coming from the rear of the engine via a hard line that runs parallel to the muffler. I hope that made sense.

Here are the questions:

1. I will no doubt need to drain the oil tank = Oil change - no problem there, but i did that last fall..........

2. Will I need special oil line wrenches that I have heard so much about?

3. Will these be hard to loosen?

4. I would no doubt need to remove the rear wheel, so standard safety proceedures must apply.

it all seems like:

Order replacement lines from Pelican
Drain oil
Jack up car
Remove rear wheel
remove oil lines - making sure to catch any oil left in lines
_______________
install new lines and oil filter
replace rear wheel - torque lugs
Lower car
fill with oil
check for leaks...........

Am I missing something here?

A couple of hours and I am back in business.

Thanks for your time in reading this and if I missed ANYTHING, please let me know.
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Old 04-30-2007, 06:14 AM
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You can get by with two large channel locks a d a large set of vice grips but I have better luck with the thin bicycle wrenches by Park or Campagnola. You may need heat to get them to crack and a LOT of strength.

Replacement requires oil change and rear wheel removal. Replacement hoses are available but rumor has it they leak.....bad sloppy aftermarket crap is being sold out there.

Best to take the hoses to a local hydraulic repair shop and have new hoses installed on your old hose ends. Also W A Y cheaper. Depending on the shop, they can do it while you wait.
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:00 AM
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Re: 1982 SC Oil Line replacement

Quote:
Originally posted by 1911Guy


Here are the questions:

1. I will no doubt need to drain the oil tank = Oil change - no problem there, but i did that last fall..........

2. Will I need special oil line wrenches that I have heard so much about?

3. Will these be hard to loosen?

4. I would no doubt need to remove the rear wheel, so standard safety proceedures must apply.

it all seems like:

Order replacement lines from Pelican
Drain oil
Jack up car
Remove rear wheel
remove oil lines - making sure to catch any oil left in lines
_______________
install new lines and oil filter
replace rear wheel - torque lugs
Lower car
fill with oil
check for leaks...........

Am I missing something here?

A couple of hours and I am back in business.

Thanks for your time in reading this and if I missed ANYTHING, please let me know.
It's been 20yrs since I last did mine but as I recall this wrench was helpfull

pretty expensive from Stahlwille but I hear reasonably priced at a bicycle shop

yes, the nuts will be frozen by time, heatcycle and galvanic action. I would plan on replacing the t-stat in addition to the lines. You can try soaking in PB blaster and heat helps, I recall doing mine in an unheated garage on a 5&deg Jan. day so maybe some wishful thinking there. Don't forget that the front connections will need to come off too, that can lead to additional complications. It is easiest to drop the assembly as a unit and then disassemble from there, the wheeel well is very tight and it would be easy to damage the body sheetmetal.

I used antiseize on reassembly and the lines have come apart w/o issue ever since.
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:16 AM
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I had one come off very easy and one that came off with some of the threads off the thermostat housing after heat, PB, etc. You won't know untill you try.
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:48 AM
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I'm doing the exact same thing to my 83 sc this week. Just waiting for the oil wrenches to arrive. one word: leverage... get an extension on that wrench.

Last edited by on-ramp; 04-30-2007 at 08:07 AM..
Old 04-30-2007, 08:03 AM
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These don't look like re-usable fittings and I would advise against re-using any fittings that are 25+ yrs old.

I changed this leaky line out with a new part from Pelican. It was surprisingly easy. I must of been lucky.

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Old 04-30-2007, 08:27 AM
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It is possible to re-use the fitting. Once the outer collar is cut-off, the inner barbed piece can be removed. Installing requires a new collar and a special tool to crimp it. Similar to fabricating a/c hoses. If you wanted to get fancy, you could use braided stainless hose instead of the factory rubber. At the pipe end, it's a similar operation. Unless you have the tools, or access to them, it's probably far easier to simply replace with factory lines.
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Old 04-30-2007, 08:54 AM
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The replacement line already has a new fitting on it. Why even bother screwing around with the old one?
Old 04-30-2007, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by on-ramp
The replacement line already has a new fitting on it. Why even bother screwing around with the old one?
Price and bad replacement parts that leak.....
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Old 04-30-2007, 09:02 AM
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I find it hard to believe Pelican would sell new replacement oil lines that leak. has it happened to anyone?
Old 04-30-2007, 09:04 AM
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I would put my trust in a new line with fittings.

Back when I had a real job, hose assembly was a daily practice. Typical re-usable fittings are assembled in a vise with wrenches. No crimping necessary. These were used in low pressure applications, say less than 350psi. High pressure hoses were always permanently crimped.
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Last edited by TerryH; 04-30-2007 at 09:23 AM..
Old 04-30-2007, 09:19 AM
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Thanks for all the replies. Does Porsche still sell OEM's?
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Old 04-30-2007, 01:08 PM
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The only potential pitfall is if the oil lines are stuck. I had no problem with a 36 and 32 mm wrench. But did you say you are removing the convoluted line that attaches to the rear of the engine? If you mean the one that hooks into the engine block towards the rear and center, then the heat exchangers will be in the way. If so that will be a weekend long project.
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Old 04-30-2007, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by on-ramp
I find it hard to believe Pelican would sell new replacement oil lines that leak. has it happened to anyone?
I never said Pelican is deliberately selling defective parts...what I said was that there are crappy aftermarket ones out there that leak. Having them redone is cheaper and easier.
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Old 04-30-2007, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mikez
I never said Pelican is deliberately selling defective parts...what I said was that there are crappy aftermarket ones out there that leak. Having them redone is cheaper and easier.
I never said that you said that Pelican is deliberately selling defective parts.


I just happened to order mine from Pelican and I didn't think there would be a problem. Unless, of course, you damage the line during improper installation. then that could cause a leak too..
Old 04-30-2007, 02:08 PM
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I just did this a few weeks ago. Ordered the parts from our host. My car is an '88 Carrera but I would guess the proceedure is similar for the SC.

Heating the nuts is a MUST. Get them good and hot, my experience was that the residual PB Blaster oil on the lines at least 1/2" to 3/4" from the nut should start to evaporate (as in smoke). About 3-4 minutes with a propane tourch, moving it around to all sides of the nut. Make sure you counter hold the nuts on the hard line and the thermostat when you loosen.

I was also going to do some maintenance on the front oil cooler and thought that I would drop the entire assembly but the torsion bar housing would not let me, so I had to remove the rear lines separately. I applied PB Blaster the night before, but in reality it is the HEAT that really works to loosen the nuts.

Drain all the oil, if you use these same tools you might as well remove the rear of the rubber S-line now too (you'll see why).

I did not have the special tools so these were my weapons of choice (thats a 24" long level for reference):
1-7/16 box wrench, 30mm spanner/box, Big Channel-Loc, pipe wrench


Start at the rear hard line. Heat well, use 30mm spanner on the hard line to hold it and the pipe wrench on the nut.
Photo of disconneted oil line at hard line (S-Line still connected).


Then move to the oil tank line. I used the pipe wrench here. There is no nut to counter hold so heat very well (I had visions of the fitting shearing off the tank). You will have to move the lower fender support rod (if you have one) out of the way, remove the bottom nut and loosen the upper bracket nuts and the support rod will rotate.
Disconnected oil tank line with bracket moved.



Now it gets tricky. I had removed the rear oil line supports in the rear wheel well. I had also removed the rocker panels and loosened the oil line brackets all the way to the front wheel well, anticipating removal as a unit. At the least you have to remove the rockers to allow access to the thermostat (see photos below). Loosening the hard lines all the way to the front wheel well allowed movement of the oil thermostat to get a better grip on it I thought. Your results may vary.

Start with the outer thermostat connection. This is the method I used. Slip the 1-7/16" box wrench over the rear disconnected end of the oil line. This is why you have to dissconnect the S-Line. Slide the wrench near to the thermostat nut. HEAT the nut as described. Reach thru the torsion bar access (why you removed the rocker panel) and get a good grip on the theromostat with the Channel-Loc. Slide the box wrench on the nut and apply elbow grease. Keep your chin out of the way at his point! Mine is still brused. The photo here is before I actually did the deed. The later photos show tape applied to protect the panel edges. Apply as shown and around the edge of the torsion bar access.

Close-up of process:


Same drill with inner oil line nut. Notice tape in this pic AND the plastic cap to protect thermostat threads.



Installation is the reverse. Here are a few tips to help:

Apply anti sieze to threads, but keep it off the mating surfaces of the fittings.

Also apply anti sieze to the back side of the ridge where the nut will press and (using a tooth pick or similar "tool") get the anti sieze between the nut and the fitting at the rubber hose end. The reason for this is that when you tighten up the nuts the oil line will want to twist and they will not line up or mount correctly. the anti-sieze allows the nut to turn without twisting the line. Trust me you will thank me for this one:-)

Apply anti-sieze here:

And here:
Move the nut up and down and twist it to get the anti-sieze worked into the ridge.


All done!


Good Luck
Andrew
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Last edited by aj88cab; 04-30-2007 at 03:21 PM..
Old 04-30-2007, 02:51 PM
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Wow, nice write up. I'll be putting in a Carrera cooler and am contemplating getting the oil lines seperated. I may have the lines to and from the cooler fabbed up by reusing the old fittings taken to a hydraulic hose shop.
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Old 04-30-2007, 04:55 PM
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Just an FYI, you can get a 36mm combo wrench from any NAPA store for about $20. I asked my local one and they had it for me the next morning. I then cut a slot out of the boxed end (it was a combo wrench) and voila!.. a pipe wrench. To remove the old crap I cut the oil lines right at the nut and put a 36mm socket on them with my air impact, whacked them right off and I used my custom wrench to put the new one on..
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Last edited by GaryR; 04-30-2007 at 05:53 PM..
Old 04-30-2007, 05:42 PM
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I didnt eve try to loosen them without doing the dremel cut in the old line bolts. Came right off no problem.
Old 04-30-2007, 05:49 PM
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I had to cut notches in the head of the nut and use a cold-chisel to remove the line.

I tried heating with a MAPP torch and maybe I didn't heat long enough> chickened out ..

I bought a 36mm wrench [ebay] and made my custom 36mm line wrench > worked nice .

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Old 05-01-2007, 02:19 PM
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