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turbo tie rods - front end off of ground?

Do I need to have the front end in the air and front wheels off to install turbo tie rods? I have a 4 post lift and would like to avoid bending my old body!

Thanks, Goosh
Old 07-18-2007, 01:43 PM
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Yes to both. Have fun getting the old ones out of the spindle.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:49 PM
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A sharp SMACK on the steering knuckle with a STEEL hammer will free that tie rod end. I'm talking about a fairly hearty SMACK.

You should then be able to unscrew the rod from the rack. Getting the turbo rods screwed into the rack is a little more challenging. There is a special tool for that. You will need to turn the wheels to gain access. Yes, the wheels need to be off the ground.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:59 PM
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I installed turbo tie rods on my car, and the spring retainers for the boots are a bear to get back on. There isn't a whole lot of room your hands next to the steering rack. Don't get frustrated and use tie wraps instead of the springs. The springs keep all the nasty stuff outside of the boots.

After reading about other people doing this job, I learned some were taking the entire steering rack off of the car. While this sounds like a lot more work, it's not. There are only a few more bolts to take off, and the whole rack assembly comes free. Then you easy access for replacing the tie rods, boots and springs. You can also clean and regrease the steering rack.

If I were to do the job again, I think I'd drop the steering rack. Do a search and you'll see pictures of how easy it comes out.
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:15 PM
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I dropped my steering rack (4 bolts... and loosen the steering coupler in the smugglers box) and the tie rods became a 10 minute job to get off and back on the rack itself. I just used the tie rod as a wrench - bend it all the way down, and then lefty loosy.

I guess the hardest part might be getting rack back in by yourself since getting the shaft on the rack back into the coupler in the smugglers box takes some coordination.

Good luck!!!

Todd
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:42 PM
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Quote "the spring retainers for the boots are a bear to get back on"

just thread a zip-tie under the spring and ease it around the boot, no need for sharp screwdrivers or other instruments.If you join the zip-tie together it makes for a handy hook to put your fingers in...hope this helps someone as it made my install very straight forward.

Mark
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:45 PM
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EEEK!

Do not use a pickle fork on your tie rods. Well maybe if you want to bend something go ahead. But once you get the new turbo tie rods installed, this is the tool to remove the tie rods from the steering arm:


It threads on to the tie rod,and doesn't come into contact with the rubber boot. If you look at your pin there is a little cup shaped depression. The ball bearing on the tool fits into it and presses the pin out of the steering arm. There will be no damage to your steering, tie rod, or boot. And it's pro quality so it lasts. This particular tool is a BMW tool, but fits Porsche (Lemforder?) tie rods.
Old 07-18-2007, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mhinch
Quote "the spring retainers for the boots are a bear to get back on"

just thread a zip-tie under the spring and ease it around the boot, no need for sharp screwdrivers or other instruments.If you join the zip-tie together it makes for a handy hook to put your fingers in...hope this helps someone as it made my install very straight forward.

Mark
Brilliant! I wish I would have thought of that! I spent a LONG TIME getting those buggers back

BTW, don't buy a Porsche wrench _ go to the bike shop and get a Park Wrench, model number HCW5. It has two sides, one side is a hook that works to get the old tie rod off and the other, a nice, thin 32 mm wrench to snug up the new turbo's.

This is a great BBS.

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Old 07-18-2007, 04:15 PM
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There are three reasonable methods for removing tie rod ends from the steering knuckle. One is the picklefork. It will likely ruin the rubber part of the tie rod end, but you are removing them anyway. Another is the tool pictured above. That tool is superior to the picklefork. But ALL, and I mean ALL the professional mechanics with whom I have ever discussed this procedure use the hammer method. I'd guess at least eight out of ten mechanics use the hammer method.

You see, the tie rod end stud is conical, and so is the bore in the steering knuckle. Take the cotter pin out and remove the castle nut. (if you are ever tempted to bang on the stud (not a good idea), the put the castle nut on backwards and bang on the nut. Still a bad idea.) With the nut removed, get a good sized hammer (at least a full sized framing hammer or perhaps a short-handled sledge). WHACK the steering knuckle. This will momentarily deform the bore. The temporarily deformed bore will no longer accommodate the conical stud, and will spit it out. If it does not, then you have not whacked it hard enough. That steering knuckle, though it is a cast part, is more robust than you expect.
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Old 07-18-2007, 04:52 PM
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Great feedback - thanks for the advice!! Yep, this is a great forum!! Thanks, Goosh
Old 07-18-2007, 05:01 PM
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You can choose to be a whacker, boot ripper, or body bender. You don't have to but you can choose to .....

Old 07-18-2007, 05:05 PM
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I used a fork rod to separate them. Went very smoothly, you just have to take your time. Or if you are just going to scrap the old tie-rods, then whack the crap out of them.

The hardest part of this job for me was to "slip" the new tie-rod boots on and then get the securing spring bands in place. Deffiniately a PITA but using some patroleum jelly helped quite a bit (and it will help seal out moisture).

-Matt
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Old 07-18-2007, 08:05 PM
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steering rack is out ... but bearing is damaged!!

I removed the steering rack - not as easy as some suggested - U joint in smuggler box had to be loosened at both ends - I think one must take the bolts completely out because the ends of the steering shafts have dentents for the bolts to snuggle against - biggest bummer was stripping the bottom allen bolt for the clamp that hold the steering column to the chassis - had to drill out the old bolt and retap. I had to remove the A/C evaporator to gain access to the lower bolt for the drilling and tapping. Fortunately, I am replacing most of the A/C components and the evaporator is one of them - didn't plan it that way ... but I'll work with it.

I had a buddy help with the rack removal - not sure if I could have done it alone. Once the rack was on the bench, I removed both access plates to the center of the rack and found the bearing (that presses against the rack via a spring) was badly worn - now trying to figure out where to get a replacement part. Anyone know where to get parts that are inside the steering rack other than the bearings that are clearly marked.

I have attached a couple of pictures of the damaged bearing, let me know if you can tell me where to find it!!

Thanks, Goosh
Old 07-29-2007, 07:43 PM
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I have found that the easiest way to remove the tie rod is to cut a piece of angle iron or other similar support and stick it under the arm close to the joint. If you measure the distance from the bottom of the arm to the floor and add 1/2" it works perfect. You just lift the spindle a little bit and let it come down and rest on the angle.

Next get a brass hammer and give it a whack. It will come out on the first try without ruining anything. The key is supporting the arm. If you smack it without the support everything just flexes.

Here is a picture....
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Old 07-29-2007, 10:45 PM
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For those who desire hitting the side of the steering arm, place a second hammer on the back (non-strike) side. This supports the arm somewhat as the opposite side is assaulted by the hammer blow. There's less chance distorting the arm using this method.

Sherwood
Old 07-29-2007, 11:51 PM
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I've just finished this job on my '72 and would echo those comments about taking the rack off. I didn't and its HARD with just the car on ramps. You are so limited for space under there tightening the rods into the rack and getting the boots on is a real pain.

I agree on on the plastic ties - I don't see how the spring retainers do a better job and plastic ties are much easier to get on.

Getting the old rods off shouldn't be that hard providing you have the right tools (as shown here) plus a big ass hammer. That said I broke the first rod end removal tool I used - tightened it as much as I could, rod end still didn't move and the metal deformed on the tool. Get something heavy duty.
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Old 07-30-2007, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 911pcars View Post
For those who desire hitting the side of the steering arm, place a second hammer on the back (non-strike) side. This supports the arm somewhat as the opposite side is assaulted by the hammer blow. There's less chance distorting the arm using this method.

Sherwood
The arm should be on the non strike side, so no need for another hammer.

I have a similar tool pictured by Rusnak and that is totally useless. It distorts and slips of the stud, despite the ball shape, when the friction becomes large enough.
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Old 07-31-2007, 02:37 PM
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I can't speak to your tool, Safe. I would have thought Swedish tools to be better made than that. All I can say is that the one that I have works every time, and I haven't had to use force on the steering arm and I have never torn the boot.

I like Paul S's idea of supporting the steering arm. Makes a lot of sense to me. The pickle fork thing is probably the worst way to go.
Old 07-31-2007, 04:02 PM
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Great tips here, thanks guys!
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Old 07-31-2007, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rusnak View Post
I can't speak to your tool, Safe. I would have thought Swedish tools to be better made than that.
It's probably Chinese.
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Old 08-01-2007, 02:51 AM
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