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rs27carrera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
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DIY: How to repair steering column bushing?

Thought to post simple guide to fix usual worn steering column bushing. You know, this is the cure if you feel your steering wheel moving up and down, left and right, just less than 1 cm.

Here is a a picture of new bearing. It comes with white inner plastic ring, and that ring is actually broken, bearing itself is very fine (99.9% sure).




BUT, to replace that bearing is a pain in the ass and requires some hours job if you like to do it. Also if you think to buy just new bearing, remove plastic ring and just attach it, it does not work. The reason is, this plastic ring has small lip in other end, and it just fits inside bearing in one position. That is position you should remove steering column etc. etc. so hours of work.

Luckily there are 928 steering column ring what can be used instead, and it's better than original. Here is picture of backage I got it, you see original code number to buy it (or Pelican may have some other similar ring).





This metal ring is just simply to install, you take out steering wheel and clean remains of that white plastic piece i.e.


1.) Remove "horn bad" from steering wheel. It may be tight but it's not connected with any screws i.e. you just take good grip and pull it. Here is picture of it so you see how it's connected.




2.) You use 27mm socket to remove wheel nut. Note to set wheel straight before you remove for easy reinstallation (to make sure wheel is aligned when you drive on straight road). Then just pull wheel off, it's not usually jammed to rod (horn bad is usually harder to remove).


3.) Clean those remains of white plastic.


4.) Insert now that 928 part. Here you see it.




5.) And here it's installed. It slips easily inside original column bearing, if not, just tap is gently.




6.) Then just reinstall steering wheel, install spacer and tighten nut. Connect horn grounding cable to horn bad and install bad into wheel. If you like, you could put a bit greese into those three bad holding brackets, so it's easier to remove it next time.


7.) Continue to enjoy your 911!!


Regards, Harri from China

PS. I have possible the only old school 911 here, they think it's Ferrari as it's red

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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 10-30-2007, 09:16 PM
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Very true for those folks with a 74 or newer vehicle. Please read John Walker's warning here: problems arising with metal steering bushing.

... and of course there is the "Pelican" way of doing it here: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/911_Steering-bushing/911_steering_bushing.htm
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Harry
1970 VW Sunroof Bus - "The Magic Bus"
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Old 10-30-2007, 09:26 PM
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Thanks Harry for additional input!

I believe that 928 part is actually protecting steering rod as it's pretty long piece of tube (now no play between steering rod and 928 part, and this is way it's made in 928 anyway). Now small play is in between 928 part and original bearing inner casing.

And sorry to forgot that "C-clip" naturally it need to be removed before new goes in.
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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 10-30-2007, 09:51 PM
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FWIW, your earlier cars have a fix as well. Good info here: HELP! Steering wheel bushing quickfix???
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Harry
1970 VW Sunroof Bus - "The Magic Bus"
1973.5 911T Targa - "Smokey"
2003 BMW Z4 3.0i
2009 MB C300
Old 10-30-2007, 10:06 PM
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Harri - what part of China? Are you inland? I'd have thought there'd be a few on the coast -- the "go-go" areas of the economy....
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Old 10-31-2007, 10:33 AM
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A bit offtopic.... sorry.

I am in Shanghai, enclosed is a pic of me and 911 in Shanghai F1 Circuit. Never went to drive though, due to rules said some Chinese dude must sit beside to you and I did not like that idea .



In Hong Kong there are plenty of 911, maybe in South Guangdon province too. You know many nice cars are smuggled to mainland. I have seen these motors in their boats too.



I bought my car from US East coast, via ebay and company sent it to me here!! After visiting 22 offices and checking points here, I got legal plates & rights to even sell the car here if so wished.
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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 10-31-2007, 05:33 PM
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After replacing a worn bushing with little or no problem, as described in the threads, I'm now curious as to the need to apply grease. John Walker's link recommends it, but the Pelican link (which I followed trouble free when I did my install) doesn't mention it.

I'm sure it won't hurt to add grease - my question is what grease and or how to apply without removing the new metal sleeve after it's already installed? Could a small gun simply shoot it down the shaft effectively?
Old 11-02-2007, 04:50 PM
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When I installed my bush, I did not put any greese at all. But if you like to add it, it's just there to ease very small "flex" or prevent rust so it can be 4WD (a bit thin), spray vaseline (easy to apply with nozzle and tube) or oil with gun you mentioned. I believe they stay there and do the thing.

But I am of opinion, there can not be any play between bush and streering shaft (so greese has no use), it's just between bush and bearing inner housing and they are made of material that do fine without gearse and eventually you me need to replace one of them, what I doubt will take some 10 years, if never.
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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 11-02-2007, 05:42 PM
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read my post again. SERIOUS SHAFT DAMAGE! the grease suggestion isn't to prevent flex or rust i can assure you.
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Old 11-02-2007, 06:02 PM
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I can not see any reason why shaft will get damaged when bush is installed without or with greese AND BEARING ITSELF IS OK. That bush is original way in 928, do they need it? Are you sure that bearing were ok when you installed bush?

In case bearing is seased and you install bushing, there is danger that bush is "fixed" to outer housing via bearing, and sliding happens just between bush and shaft. Situation gets even worse in case you add greese there, where you "encourage" this to happen even more, i.e. with slightly damaged bearing you start to use that bush-shaft as a bearing. And this should never happen as bush is not made out of bearing metal.

Trouble is, how to make sure bearing is fine, when it's inside steering column, maybe broken bearing were the reason original plastic clip get broken, maybe this is reason Porsche used plastic inner ring, so it will damage first giving indication to change whole bearing?

I think, the best would be (in order):
- not to use anything else but original bearing & white plastic ring
- to have replacement plastic ring, what can be installed like 928 part (delrin etc. can work as a bearing if necessary, much better than steel bushing)
- if 928 bush is installed, before steering wheel is installed, rotate steering shaft by some means to make sure there is no sliding/life between bush & rod

So, all in all, I started to think: a) oil should not be added there at all and b) this issues is more serious than we think it to be!
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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 11-04-2007, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
I can not see any reason why shaft will get damaged when bush is installed without or with greese AND BEARING ITSELF IS OK.
Pay attention to John; he's been working on 911's for 30+ years and has forgotten more about them than we ever knew.

If you cannot get the old bushing out, you will need to find some way of injecting grease in there.

ianc
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Old 11-05-2007, 02:24 PM
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I look this issue from my professional point of view too (I am not just ordinary engineer as background, so to say), not to blame anyone or look who is who, all respect to people in this forum.

But, this 928 bushing is no way to be used as "bearing". Hence, there shall NOT be any play between steering shaft and 928 bushing and that's why question is, why to add greese there? If one shaft is heavily damaged, this is clear indication original bearing may not be working at all, it's hard to check when it's inside tube.

I believe people understand my ideology in this.

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Kind regards, Harri

964 C4 1992, 930 "RS3.0 looker", Carrera 3.0 1976
911 2.4E 1972 (to be 2.4S+ spec race car), 911 2.2T 1967
Old 11-05-2007, 03:28 PM
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