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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Stow, MA & Ashland, NH
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At last resort, IF you can cut into the nut with a air cutoff wheel JUST enough to see a thread, you can lay the Kroil or PB Blaster or Acetone mix in there and let it do its thing for a day or two.

On occasion we have also drilled small holes (1.0 - 1.5 mm) into the nut to allow the penetrant inside. Does not affect the oil seal as the threads only retain the line. It's the contact of the brass globe against its mate that makes the oil seal.

Once the penetrant can get in there you should have no trouble getting it off.

Len


Last edited by BoxsterGT; 09-13-2017 at 05:26 AM..
Old 09-13-2017, 05:03 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
KTL KTL is offline
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Acetone is easy to get. It's like paint thinner or mineral spirits and you can get it at your local home improvement store.

As others have said in this thread, patience is key here and brute force is often your enemy. My experience with these external oil lines has been good and bad.

The good is of course be patient. Heat is a big help but not necessarily the only key to winning. The key in my opinion is using the heat to get the penetrant to do it's job. Heat up the fittings and then apply the penetrant. The heat helps draw the penetrant in.

Usually the biggest enemy here is the junk that has crept into the fitting over the years. The shoulder of the nut and the smooth "shank" part of the spherical fitting get clogged up with dirt and corrosion. This location is the opening of the nut where the hose fitting passes through it. So my point is that you want to get the penetrant in there as much you want it to penetrate the threads.

When this area is clogged with crap, it doesn't let the nut spin independent of the hose fitting. As you try to loosen the connection, the fitting spins with nut and it still has pressure against the receiving part. As the nut turns, you think you're making progress. But you're actually damaging the sealing ability of the machined seat. Therefore cutting the nut helps to relieve that pressure on the receiving part.

But there are some nuts you just don't want to cut. Like the nuts that connect the brass oil cooler lines to the thermostat. So I think these locations are key in getting that crud busted free and some penetrant in there.

My bad:

I've seen the steel nuts tear apart the oil cooler fittings when people just didn't think of cutting the nuts. My '86 has alumium repair fittings on the cooler because the previous owner of my car (deceased friend Mark) wasn't patient enough with the nuts on these lines. Thankfully he was able to salvage the oil cooler and Otto's in Venice (also deceased) welded some new fittings on it.

I've seen the thermostat destroyed by the method of cutting the hose and fitting a socket onto the 36mm nut. My friend Stefan was struggling with removal of the oil lines on the engine side of the thermostat. We finally decided to say screw it and just replace the troublesome line. He cut the steel tubing with an air saw and we then had easy access to the nut. That gave us the false sense of victory because the next move was to foolishly use an impact gun on the nut with too much power. Did it destroy the thermostat threads? Nope. Well, yes it did but not in the usual manner. It split the thermostat wide open by breaking away a huge chunk of the aluminum thermostat body. Ooops............ Expensive mistake there!!!!!

I think a good thing to do after we've got all these fittings loosened up and working freely again is "exercise" the various oil line fittings when you do future oil changes. This will help to keep the crud buildup from solidifying and freezing the fittings. And of course be sure to use a good amount of antiseize paste on the threads to keep them from being harmed by galvanic corrosion.

Lastly, anybody that has some slightly boogered up thermostat or oil cooler threads can shoot me a PM and you can borrow my M30 x 1.5 re-threading die. Yep it's a big one. And a good one because it's an actual RE-threading die to clean up the threads. It's not cut like a typical die that cuts new threads. Or you can use a thread repair file.
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Old 09-13-2017, 10:00 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #22 (permalink)
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I managed to break the two connections on the cooler itself but it took some torque. The two ends that connect to the brass lines are REALLY stuck. I am using PB Blaster, heat, and some sort of "freeze breaker" stuff that is similar to PB. I'll just keep heating and adding PB Blaster. I have started to cut some notches in the steel nuts to potentially break it free but maybe I won't need to do that. BTW I seemed to recall someone here saying acetone is also nail polish remover...just grabbed one of my wife's bottles of polish remover...sure enough main ingredient is acetone. I'll have to sneak it into the garage without her knowing, otherwise I'll be in serious trouble.
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Old 09-13-2017, 05:58 PM
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FINALLY! Got the connections at the brass oil line ends lose. What a beating! I almost created a disaster using propane...I suddenly noticed the wheel well steet metal seemed pretty close to the lines...put my hand on top and it was REALLY hot but I could still keep my hand on it. Much longer and I'd been looking at a VERY expensive screw up. I've seen the paint on the back bumper get a lot hotter due to the muffler. I''ll be using anti seize on the install. should I take the cooler out? Anything I should be doing to it since I sort of have access to it now? Got it loose by buying couple pieces of plumbing pipe to use as cheater bars and they'd been soaking in PB Blaster for a few days.
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'88 Coupe, '87 Cab,
'88 535i sold '07 A4 sold, '14 C250 DD
Warren Hall, gone but not forgotten
Old 09-16-2017, 11:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #24 (permalink)
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Join Date: Nov 2000
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FINALLY! Got the connections at the brass oil line ends lose. What a beating! I almost created a disaster using propane...I suddenly noticed the wheel well steet metal seemed pretty close to the lines...put my hand on top and it was REALLY hot but I could still keep my hand on it. Much longer and I'd been looking at a VERY expensive screw up. I've seen the paint on the back bumper get a lot hotter due to the muffler. I''ll be using anti seize on the install. should I take the cooler out? Anything I should be doing to it since I sort of have access to it now? Got it loose by buying couple pieces of plumbing pipe to use as cheater bars and they'd been soaking in PB Blaster for a few days.
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Buck
'88 Coupe, '87 Cab,
'88 535i sold '07 A4 sold, '14 C250 DD
Warren Hall, gone but not forgotten
Old 09-16-2017, 02:33 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #25 (permalink)
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