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hilandscott's Avatar
 
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Location: Athens, GA, USA
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Question SC gas tank repair or replace?

The fumes in the garage are coming from a slow leak-through of fuel at the very bottom of the tank-- on the car I just drove back from the shop three weeks ago. My guess is that the age of the car has been compounded by having sat for extended periods of disuse...having been rebuilt twice now (at least). Of course I am driving the car a bunch for the first time in many years-- and spirited driving at that.

My question: Is an old rusted/compromised tank worth messing with (the "boil and coat" treatment at the radiator shop that was mentioned in a prior thread) given cost (at least $100) and safety (might not be so structurally sound) or should I replace it with the "mint" tank I found for $350?

I'm hoping there are enough folks who have dealt with this and feel confindent in the outcome. Perhaps someone even in the Atlanta vacinity who can recommend a shop for the work...

Thanks -- John

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Old 05-02-2002, 05:14 PM
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Since it is a very small leak for the moment-- and no one has replied yet-- I'm going to use a magnet to evaluate the extent of the rust and the integrity of the surrounding steel. There must be a better way than pH washing it and seeing what kind of a sieve is left over...
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Old 05-03-2002, 04:36 AM
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I would go ahead and replace the old tank with a new "duplicate of original" galvanized tank as sold by performance products for around $300. I believe this is a new item offered by them, as it is not yet on their website. However, it is in their newest catalog. Just go to their website and request the latest catalog. I would avoid used, as you will probably have the same problems that you are having now again in the near future...

Bill
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Old 05-03-2002, 04:50 AM
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I would go new!
Old 05-03-2002, 05:51 AM
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I wouldn't fool with the old tank. Go with new.
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Old 05-03-2002, 06:29 AM
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There is an alternative to the radiator shop approach. Try this site:
http://www.gastankrenu.com/welcome.htm

The process invoves blasting the interior and exterior with some kind of media, repairing any damaged areas and recoating inside and out. I seem to recall that the cost was around $275. If you can get a new tank for $300, go new. One caveat--I would check to see if anyone has had any experience with the repro tank that Warment mentions. Often, aftermarket "duplicate" parts just aren't of the same quality and fit that we expect from OEM.

Good luck.
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Old 05-03-2002, 06:42 AM
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When dealing with corrosion in a fuel tank, alway consider the safety aspect.
The metal in the area of the leak is paper thin. In the event of a frontal crash the tank will fail and the possibility of fire is great.
I recommend that you follow the advice of the guys who have posted here advocating replacement.
Old 05-03-2002, 06:49 AM
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For that price, I wouldn't mess with the old tank. I did the flush and coat treatment on my old tank and it worked very well, but I wouldn't do it again if I could get a new replacement for the price you mentioned...and mine wasn't weakened in any way (just filled with sludge).
Old 05-03-2002, 08:38 AM
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Thumbs down Not available past '73

Thanks guys -- bad news (just called Performance Products, sorry Wayne) is that the replacement tank is only available up to '73, so 22 gal tank I need is not offered.

As the fuel drains from the tank, there is a bunch of water mixed in. Don't know how much rust is floating around to clog the fuel filter, but I'm concerned enough that I will just try to replace the thing with a good used tank.

Any thoughts on prepping a used tank before installation to cure/prevent further rust?? I will renew the rubber and breather lines while I'm at it.
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Old 05-03-2002, 12:09 PM
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The best way to find out what's going on is to pull the tank and inspect it. If the leak is a crack it can be repaired. If the inside of the tank is full of rust then have it coated if a replacement is not available.

Steve
Old 05-03-2002, 12:53 PM
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por-15 makes a fuel tank sealer. I haven't used this product, but I have used other por-15 products. About $18/quart. Might be worth a try.

http://www.por15.com/faqs/faqtanks.html
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Old 05-03-2002, 01:10 PM
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Question viewed the site-- how difficult in practice?

The POR-15 product looks good, but the details of the Porsch tank application are what I am hoping to get now... that is, in practice, how well can the average person clean, prep and *thoroughly* dry the tank to get a proper seal?

Are there baffles or other obstacles that prevent getting everything cleaned and out in the tank?

Thanks for the input.
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Old 05-04-2002, 07:59 AM
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I don't remember seeing any baffles while fishing the fuel sender out of my '78 tank after it came apart. I think if you remove the fuel sender, you can get a pretty good view inside the tank.
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Old 05-04-2002, 10:46 AM
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Hilandscott
Try this link to Eastwood Co.
http://www.vista1.com/eastwood/

Do a search for "gas tank repair."

If I'm not in error, Gastank renu (see link in my previous post above) offers a lifetime warranty on their work.

I had mine done by a radiator shop about 5 years ago and so far so good. For $100, it was well worth it. One note of caution if you do this yourself-- beware of the fumes released by the sealer!! I had a friend who did this job himself to save $50 and he ended up sick from the fumes for 2 days.

Good luck.
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Old 05-06-2002, 04:44 AM
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Re: viewed the site-- how difficult in practice?

Quote:
Originally posted by hilandscott
The POR-15 product looks good, but the details of the Porsch tank application are what I am hoping to get now... that is, in practice, how well can the average person clean, prep and *thoroughly* dry the tank to get a proper seal?

Are there baffles or other obstacles that prevent getting everything cleaned and out in the tank?

Thanks for the input.
I've used the POR-15 gas tank kit with great success. There are no baffles that you need to worry about, but there is a screen over the intake fuel line so make sure you remove the line from inside the tank, the fitting is easy to unscrew. To dry out the tank the instructions suggested using a hair dryer, which I did and it worked very well.

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Old 05-06-2002, 05:47 AM
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