Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > Porsche 911 Technical Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
Well. I have been known to burn some metal before.
__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-20-2015, 06:06 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #61 (permalink)
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
The media blasting was called off this morning due to forecast of rain. Will reschedule later this week. This was actually a good thing as I was able to finish stripping the tub and get it up on the dolly I built.

It is working really well. easy to move around with one person. I just had to have my wife help move a few wood blocks to adjust the lift height while I bolted everything in place. The dolly is higher than my lift and this presented a problem as there was overlap between the mounting points and sections of the lift. I slid the tub forward, bolted on the front, then lifted the rear and bolted it on. Was pretty easy but I had to go slow working mostly solo. Safety First.





The thing I like is the clearance underneath. This is where I will spend a majority of time over the next few months as I cut, weld and repeat in a different area. The tub is 34" off the floor after sitting on the castors.



While the car was out in the driveway I took some time to clean up the mess I made. Tons of rust shrapnel all over the place. I filled another trashcan. This will be less of an issue especially after the blasting process.

__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-21-2015, 02:33 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #62 (permalink)
Nabisco Premium Saltine
 
Mark Wilson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 12,767
Awesome! Are you stripping undercoat off?
Old 02-21-2015, 03:59 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #63 (permalink)
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
Yes Mark. I plan to strip the entire tub to bare metal. I will recoat it but I have seen several early cars with surface rust under the shutz. Will go to epoxy and then coat the shutz before starting paint process. Of course, there is lots of welding before any of that takes place.
__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-21-2015, 05:16 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #64 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 794
Garage
Great approach to the work at hand. Admire your work-stand/dolly. Do you have flapper discs for your 4.5" grinder, to prep metal for welding and knock back completed welds? I was a late-comer to these, but they are so much nicer than a hard disc. Best of luck moving forward, John in CT
Old 02-21-2015, 08:58 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #65 (permalink)
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
Yes. Flap wheels are just one of the tools in the arsenal against rust.

To finish welds I usually cut off the dome with a cut-off wheel and then finish with a hard wheel or flap-wheel (or both) depending on the location or access.

There is not a single technique that works in all situations. Any way you look at it its a slow, dirty process. At least its worth it in the end and I know that there will be no rust left on the car when I am finished.
__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-22-2015, 05:49 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #66 (permalink)
 
USAF VET
 
matt930s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Charleston SC
Posts: 3,017
Garage
Very impressive project. The color is amazing.

Your dolly would be a great kit for you to market and sell. You could possibly make it bolt together for ease of shipping.

MattR
Old 02-22-2015, 06:36 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #67 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: CA
Posts: 516
... and Ive been whining about replacing a small section of my floor pan. Really impressive work and project. Looking forward to the education and progress.

David
Old 02-22-2015, 07:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #68 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 312
Garage
I commend you on your commitment to get this done as well as your skill set.
__________________
1983 Porsche 911SC Blk/Blk
1956 Ford F1 - Patina
2013 Toyota Tundra 4x4 5.7
2013 Honda Pilot
Old 02-22-2015, 08:34 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #69 (permalink)
Bandwidth AbUser
 
Jim Richards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: SoCal
Posts: 28,138
What a great project, Jamie.
__________________
Jim R.
Old 02-22-2015, 08:47 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #70 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 219
Great job so far. I really admire the workmanship and just have one respectful comment that pertains to safety. I would recommend that you weld the front and rear sections of the dolly together to triangulate and stiffen it asap. My concern is that if the wheels catch on something and you push the body, then either the front or rear section could fold - especially once you start putting more weight back on the car. The way it is right now you're just relying on the bolts alone to resist the rotating tendency to want to fold. From a strictly geometry point of view, the bolts are at a significant mechanical disadvantage, especially given the long lever arm from the height of the dolly.

In the last picture I see that you've clamped a piece of bar stock between the front and rear sections. I'd weld it and consider adding more front to back stiffening.

I am really impressed by the scope of your project.
__________________
Tonger
Old 02-22-2015, 08:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #71 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Shaun @ Tru6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Cambridge, MA
Posts: 33,358
I have to agree on the dolly talk.

I made this a while ago, you can go off-roading with it.

__________________
Tru6 Restoration & Design
Old 02-22-2015, 09:59 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #72 (permalink)
Registered speed offender
 
78SCRSMAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 1,112
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonger View Post
Great job so far. I really admire the workmanship and just have one respectful comment that pertains to safety. I would recommend that you weld the front and rear sections of the dolly together to triangulate and stiffen it asap. My concern is that if the wheels catch on something and you push the body, then either the front or rear section could fold - especially once you start putting more weight back on the car. The way it is right now you're just relying on the bolts alone to resist the rotating tendency to want to fold. From a strictly geometry point of view, the bolts are at a significant mechanical disadvantage, especially given the long lever arm from the height of the dolly.

In the last picture I see that you've clamped a piece of bar stock between the front and rear sections. I'd weld it and consider adding more front to back stiffening.

I am really impressed by the scope of your project.
+1
Exactly my thoughts when I saw your photo... a single bar, even re-bar would do the trick!

Another thought... I had my tub blasted too and was hoping (even told) that the original undercoating would be easily removed in the process but a significant amount was not. That stuff is really on there and thick! You should consider removing as much as possible before hand. It's a messy job but worth the effort.
__________________
If you keep looking back, you'll never move forward.
http://forums.pelicanparts.com/paint-bodywork-discussion-forum/506621-project-911r-something.html
Old 02-22-2015, 11:52 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #73 (permalink)
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
While I appreciate the safety concerns I can say that the dolly was not quite finished. I could not get an accurate measurement between the two mounting points and the clamped square tubing was intended to be connected. It will be bolt-on so that I can temporarily remove it for underside access. I have removable straps for triangulating between opposite corners during transport.

However, regarding the strength of the bolts. This is not a concern to me. Let's see. an M10 bolt has a cross section area of 0.122 in^2. Given a typical tensile strength of 150kpsi and a shear strength of 60% this gives an individual bolt shear strength of almost 11k pounds. Then there are 6 bolts in the rear and 4 bolts in the front. I highly doubt that my less than 700# tub will exert enough force to cause an issue. Even when applied using a 3 foot lever arm of my tub stand.

Back to the build.

This morning I had my helper pull out the tools and work towards floor removal. He learned some of the finer art of drilling spot welds but the BFS (Big F***** saw) was his favorite. He did a good job guiding the saw along my marked cut lines.



First came out the DS front floor pan section.



Then we kept cutting and took out the other side. Now there is nothing left but a big giant hole and this is exactly what I wanted.



The good news is that the inside of the rockers/longs are almost perfect. Nothing more to be done here and it confirms how nice they are on the outside. This shot is looking at the underside of the seat mount rails. You can see the threaded adjuster blocks and the heater duct.



The center tunnel was not so lucky. The underside of the vapor lines are a bit corroded. At least these are not necessarily functional. The fuel lines are clean. The wiring harness looks good. It is going to be tough cleaning this up.

I think I might have to strongly consider replacing the center tunnel. That is, if I can find one. A few calls did not yield anything.



So, earlier in the post I posted the pedal cluster. Well, here is what remains of the clutch cable.



Regarding the undercoating, Yes, It is also my experience that the undercoating holds up very well against media blasting. We will see how this works. I will still consider to strip the undercoating by hand as needed. That is a very slow, process. Been there, done that a few times. It really sucks.
__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-22-2015, 03:44 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #74 (permalink)
Registered speed offender
 
78SCRSMAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 1,112
Garage
I found a 4" wire wheel attached to an angle grinder works very well to remove the undercoating. I also used an air needler (I think that's what it's called) to get in some of the tighter spaces. I agree, scraping sux!

Good luck Jamie, off to a great start!
__________________
If you keep looking back, you'll never move forward.
http://forums.pelicanparts.com/paint-bodywork-discussion-forum/506621-project-911r-something.html
Old 02-22-2015, 04:03 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #75 (permalink)
Chain fence eating turbo
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,693
Jamie, when I worked in my dads resto shop, he bought one of those wheels that have metal fingers that were something like a few inches long that sold on TV for paint stripping you put on a drill.

I bet those things would work great for undercoating removal.

I used to fully strip cars in 20 hours to bare metal at $5/hr. See if you can find a resto shop that would only charge $100 to strip an entire car! LOL.

Tain't happenin' .......
Old 02-22-2015, 05:01 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #76 (permalink)
I would rather be driving
 
jpnovak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 7,471
Cory. I would gladly hand a Ben Franklin to someone to strip the undercoating from the tub. Let me know if you are available. I have an opening on Thursday this week.

Yes, the 4" radial braided wire wheel is a must for this work. I have been through a few of these over the years. I must say that they also remove skin quite readily. They really make a mess of knuckles. Ask me how I know. You also have to make sure you tuck your shirt in. Ask me how I know.
__________________
Jamie - I can explain it to you. But I can not understand it for you.
71 911T SWT - Sun and Fun Mobile
72 911T project car. "Minne" - A tangy version of tangerine
classicautowerks.com - EFI conversion parts
Old 02-22-2015, 06:21 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #77 (permalink)
Chain fence eating turbo
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 8,693
HAHA, you haven't "done work" until you've gotten yer shirt wrapped in a grinder!

Yeah, those brush knot wire wheels are the workhorse of said jobs.
Old 02-22-2015, 06:48 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #78 (permalink)
Registered User
 
porsche0nut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 252
Garage
This is such a cool project! Fantastic that you can share it with your son - he'll never forget it.
__________________
Jonathan
'86 911 Coupe
Old 02-22-2015, 07:00 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #79 (permalink)
Registered speed offender
 
78SCRSMAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 1,112
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpnovak View Post
Yes, the 4" radial braided wire wheel is a must for this work. I have been through a few of these over the years. I must say that they also remove skin quite readily. They really make a mess of knuckles. Ask me how I know.
They've got this handy new invention... wait for it... GLOVES! Sorry, couldn't resist!
__________________
If you keep looking back, you'll never move forward.
http://forums.pelicanparts.com/paint-bodywork-discussion-forum/506621-project-911r-something.html
Old 02-22-2015, 07:03 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #80 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:25 PM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.