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kav kav is offline
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Join Date: May 2013
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Lifting the engine

With the engine out of the 911 and somewhat cleaned up it was time to start taking this thing apart! To start that process I needed to get the lump off the floor and onto the engine stand.

This posed a bit of a problem, how do I get the engine off the furniture cart and onto the engine stand on my own? Yes I could invite a bunch of mates around and make a party out of it, then have another party to get the lump back off the stand or ... I could find another solution.

This may seem trivial to the experienced but for me I had a few head scratching moments (I'm sure this is the first of many to come!).

I thought about jacking the engine up a little at a time and putting blocks of wood under it and then raising the jack to the next level until I reached the engine stand but that all seemed very sketchy. I thought about buying or renting an engine crane but that seemed like a waste of money for such a one or two time use. In the end I decided to fabricate a hefty bracket out of 2" angle iron and lag bolt it to the main beam in the garage. From that I could attach a one ton chain hoist and lift the engine to the desired height for the P201 yoke to slip into the Harbor Freight 1/2 Ton engine stand.

This solution wasn't expensive and is there tucked away when I need it next. I can also use it to lift the palettes of household items my wife likes to buy from Costco onto the storage shelves....

I made a short video of the process (I'm prone to these I know).



Harbor Freight 1 Ton Engine Stand $40



Getting Set



Harbor Freight 1 Ton Chain Hoist $40



Harbor Freight Webbing Sling $9



2" Angle Iron $15


Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:55 AM..
Old 05-28-2015, 11:29 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Fun with power tools



The Finished Product



Attached to the beam



Engine safely on the stand!


Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 09:00 AM..
Old 05-28-2015, 11:33 PM
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You are doing just fine and it's interesting to follow a engine rebuild from the beginning.
Old 06-01-2015, 03:51 PM
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kav kav is offline
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Gifts from the Gods.

Birthdays are about getting things you want not things you need. I gave a list of things I wanted to my lovely Missus and this was what I opened yesterday. The girls laughed at each gift as they had no idea what anything was! I on the other hand cried at every gift saying 'I love it, just what I wanted!'. The pile looked like this.



Rennline goodies
Wevo engine mounts
80mm wheel studs and nuts.
A large Durant style mirror.

I am very lucky to have such a wonderful (understanding) family!

Cheers!

-Kav.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 09:01 AM..
Old 06-14-2015, 11:39 AM
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Kav, great thread! Looks like you are doing just fine. When you were lowering that motor and showing signs on anxiety about the whole thing, I knew EXACTLY how that feels as I've been there with my cars of past. I'm also no mechanic and for me it was going where I've never gone before. It's a leap of faith, especially when you're on your own and don't have someone experienced watching over your shoulder. Scary and yet thrilling times. I know through it all I made many mistakes as well, but all part of the learning process.
Old 06-14-2015, 12:15 PM
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kav kav is offline
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The Garage

The garage was a project in itself! It looked a little like a scene from 'Silence of the Lambs' when we bought the house! but the size was the thing that won me over.

We did a remodel last year and we nearly divided up the space to make a little office on one side but at the last minute after jumping through hoops with the city (ie money) to approve my plans we decided not to do it. I then spent a quarter of the office budget and turned it into what it is today. One of my better decisions!

Before I started pulling the car apart I thought it was important to have a space I could come to and enjoy the process. Also having some tools to help me do most things on my own was a must. So I drove the car with all it's quirks until the garage space was done.

I had our contractor install a spare window we had from the remodel in the corner for some natural light.



We had the space dry-walled, added the sub panel and some electrical including the overhead fluorescent lights. I then painted the space white to make it feel open and light (should have used semi-gloss of ease of wipe down).



Toys in the garage separated by 6 years (the Vespa is the older of the two). I sold the Vespa on eBay last year as I wasn't really using it. It is funding stage 1 of the Canary rebuild.



I used Rust-Oleum epoxy two part garage floor paint from Home Depot and inexpensive white vinyl baseboards.



The cabinets and countertops are from Ikea, I installed an Ikea kitchen in our old house and liked the choice of styles and simplicity of the installation. Oh and lets not forget about the price! I made a little office area in the corner in front of the window


Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 09:06 AM..
Old 06-28-2015, 10:25 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #26 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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I added more electrical for the office as well as a 220 volt outlet for the 60 gallon air compressor to run tools and the blast cabinet.



Lily loves helping me media blast parts! This is the insanely cheap Harbor Freight blast cabinet $189 (I sound like a commercial for them, trust me I'm not!). I added around three tubes of silicone to the joints when assembling as this thing leaks like a sieve! I have also added my own light and spray gun as the originals are rubbish.



The finished office space, I had to sell my vintage Eames Dat-1 office chair as although it looked cool it was too hard on the butt! I bought a used Aeron chair from Craigslist. The Epson architectural printer also came from Craigslist for $100 as it had a broken carriage belt. I watched a Youtube video of how to install a new one and got it running again for $12! I printed all of my plans for the remodel with it saving a small fortune at Kinko's!



A bit of a tight space but it works.



I know I'm trying to do way too many things in the space, garage, workshop, office, storage, workout area and darts! but it seems to be working out so far.



Cheers!

-Kav.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:38 PM..
Old 06-28-2015, 10:29 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #27 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Heat exchanger removal

First things first, tackle the removal of the very corroded heat exchangers. I'm not sure if these are original to the car (probably are) but they have seen better days. They are rusted through on the back section and not really salvageable, I had a few restless nights contemplating the outcome but in the end the reciprocating saw came out and I cut those mothers in two!


A little video of the process.



The mess.



My corroded nuts....



Too far gone. Just some of the holes.



With tubes cut away it was much easier to get at the bolts. I soaked them in PB Blaster all week and gave them plenty of heat during the process. I used an extension and a swivel on the 13mm nuts. A couple came out relatively easily and others were a complete nightmare but I didn't snap any head studs! About half of the head studs came out with the bolts.



No going back now. What do I replace them with? SSI's would be the unlimited budget choice, do splash out 2 grand? Or is Dansk a good option for 2/3's the price? What about a set of headers for $600?



Thoughts?

Cheers.

-Kav.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:39 PM..
Old 06-28-2015, 10:34 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #28 (permalink)
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Great story Kav. I'll be removing my engine this weekend so any information will come in handy. Especially the video diary, been looking for one of those for ages. Great!
Maybe one tip, I wouldn't use a tork wrench to remove the rusty nuts and bolts.

Keep up the good work, will be closely following your story.

Kind regards,

David
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Last edited by D@vid; 06-30-2015 at 05:01 AM..
Old 06-29-2015, 05:12 AM
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That is an amazing setup.
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Old 06-30-2015, 05:42 AM
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Hmm two pages and not single cheap joke on Darth Vader or the Force....

We are getting soft in our old days. Or perhaps blind as I read over it...also comes with age.
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My dad always found an excuse why not to buy a Porsche, so I guess I am all out of excuses.
Old 06-30-2015, 06:36 AM
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69 911t

great post, i also have a 69 911T that will need the same attention. good luck
Old 06-30-2015, 07:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kav View Post
First things first, tackle the removal of the very corroded heat exchangers. I'm not sure if these are original to the car (probably are) but they have seen better days. They are rusted through on the back section and not really salvageable, I had a few restless nights contemplating the outcome but in the end the reciprocating saw came out and I cut those mothers in two!


A little video of the process.



The mess.



My corroded nuts....



Too far gone. Just some of the holes.



With tubes cut away it was much easier to get at the bolts. I soaked them in PB Blaster all week and gave them plenty of heat during the process. I used an extension and a swivel on the 13mm nuts. A couple came out relatively easily and others were a complete nightmare but I didn't snap any head studs! About half of the head studs came out with the bolts.



No going back now. What do I replace them with? SSI's would be the unlimited budget choice, do splash out 2 grand? Or is Dansk a good option for 2/3's the price? What about a set of headers for $600?



Thoughts?

Cheers.

-Kav.
I would buy DANSK and have them ZIRCOTEC coated before installing. The SSI are nifty but I seldom look under the car while driving.
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My dad always found an excuse why not to buy a Porsche, so I guess I am all out of excuses.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:42 PM..
Old 06-30-2015, 07:54 AM
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Great job! I started down this road with my 72 a few years ago. I'm moving at a glacial but steady pace. May I suggest a couple things to think about?

I don't use my angle grinder or even my Dremmel around my work bench any more without taking some precautions. Metal shards go EVERYWHERE. This is the place you'll be using to reassemble your motor, right? Everything in your shop will acquire a thin layer of metal dust given time. I either use my Workmate outside or throw up a couple welding blankets and/or a strategically placed shop vac hose on the bench to catch debris. Consider putting the angle grinder guard back in place to help reduce shrapnel. I know, it's a PITA...




And, I have the smaller Harbor Freight version of that blast cabinet. It's great for the small parts but I wish, now, I had gotten the larger one. In any event, on mine, there is a vent that has a cap the same size as my shop vac hose: not a coincidence. After a few hours of use, abrasive and dust find ways out of the cabinet basically from constant over-pressure and inexpensive design...especially when you crank that sweat compressor up to 90 PSI. I now hook my vacuum, filter removed, to that cap and vent the exhaust out the door. The cap uses a couple 3m scratch pads as a filter to keep in the sand. Added benefit: It clears the air in the cabinet for better viewing.
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Old 06-30-2015, 08:06 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #34 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Documentation

With the Canary on ice for the past year almost (Too busy at work unfortunately) I attempted to get my eldest daughter Ruby interested in the car. She is the complete polar opposite to her sister when it comes to anything 'boy' related. She never wanted to ride in the Canary and would physically cry when I told her I was dropping her and her sister off at school in it!

I bribed her into going through all the history that came with the car filing it in chronological order and presenting it in a binder. For her efforts she was to get a hoodie for her favorite store 'Ivivva' (which is Lululemon for kids if you believe it!). Anyway she really got into it and enjoyed the process learning the history and asking questions about the maintenance. I was thrilled and asked her if she would like go for a ride when it's back together and she can change the gears like her younger sister? She turned to me without any hesitation and replied, "No thanks, I wouldn't be seen dead in that thing especially in this jacket".

Hmmmm.....







Cheers

-Kav

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:45 PM..
Old 12-06-2015, 11:46 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #35 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tharbert View Post
Great job! I started down this road with my 72 a few years ago. I'm moving at a glacial but steady pace. May I suggest a couple things to think about?

I don't use my angle grinder or even my Dremmel around my work bench any more without taking some precautions. Metal shards go EVERYWHERE. This is the place you'll be using to reassemble your motor, right? Everything in your shop will acquire a thin layer of metal dust given time. I either use my Workmate outside or throw up a couple welding blankets and/or a strategically placed shop vac hose on the bench to catch debris. Consider putting the angle grinder guard back in place to help reduce shrapnel. I know, it's a PITA...




And, I have the smaller Harbor Freight version of that blast cabinet. It's great for the small parts but I wish, now, I had gotten the larger one. In any event, on mine, there is a vent that has a cap the same size as my shop vac hose: not a coincidence. After a few hours of use, abrasive and dust find ways out of the cabinet basically from constant over-pressure and inexpensive design...especially when you crank that sweat compressor up to 90 PSI. I now hook my vacuum, filter removed, to that cap and vent the exhaust out the door. The cap uses a couple 3m scratch pads as a filter to keep in the sand. Added benefit: It clears the air in the cabinet for better viewing.
Great advice! Thanks!
Old 12-07-2015, 12:02 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #36 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Getting back on track.

I managed to clean up the transmission and remove the throwout bearing ready to install the new one. I will also change the fluid to $wepco. That's all I'm doing to the transmission for now, it shifted well when it was in the car so fingers crossed!





Talking of transmissions the Silver Bullet was making a grinding noise when pulling away from the lights so I opened her up to take a look. The bell housing (on the floor in this picture) had glazed over causing it to slip. I gave it a sand with 220 paper and a clean as well as the shoes. While I was in there I change the belt and variator weights. Fixed!



I think I'm going to go for the high torque starter and put the old one on the shelf, I will clean it up once the car is back together and I have some time on my hands (yeah right!)





Lily and I started blasting the engine tin ready for powder coating. This is such a satisfying job! I could do this for a living (if it paid big money and I could retire in two years!)



I heard a loud hissing noise coming from Dave (the 60 gallon compressor) and as I touched the shut off valve it exploded in half and 60 gallons of compressed air at 150psi came out like a F15's afterburner! I instantly **** my pants and was just very thankful I had bolted the thing to the garage floor! That could have been a very expensive and dangerous situation! I learned the hard way that the Husky shut off valve is garbage!



I bought a parts washer from Amazon, first thing to go in there are my pants!



Cheers.

-Kav.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 08:50 PM..
Old 12-07-2015, 07:07 PM
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haha it's scary how loud air can be. thanks for sharing!
Old 12-09-2015, 09:15 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #38 (permalink)
 
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kav kav is offline
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Engine Teardown Part 1

Getting the engine apart is my number one priority so I can find out what the issue is and how much time and money it will take to get the Canary back on the road. I was hoping for a top end rebuild only but the more I look at this engine the more I'm entertaining the thought of going through the whole process and splitting the cases as it does have just shy of 200,000 miles on it. I've heard other people say that these bottom ends are bullet proof and my lack of horse power is not putting a whole lot of stress on the internals. What to do?

I bought some specialty tools and went to town, I made another video to document and encourage hopefully.



Removed the oil feed lines to the chain tensioners.



Removed the timing chain covers and tried out my new tools, the P202 & P203.



This step gave me a few sleepless nights but the left side retaining nut came off without much drama. I did loosen the rocker arms from the valves incase something went wrong.



I wish I could say the same for the right side. This nut did not want to budge! I had to use my floor jack handle on the end of the P203 as leverage, my old torque wrench holding the P202 was strapped to the case between the case studs and I got primal on it's arse! (not sure what that means)



Before removing the chain sprocket I noted there was no dowel pin? Then I realized why, something went wrong in here.



I found the missing tooth in the chain housing, this is not a good sign of things to come.



Removed all of the head stud bolts and we'll take the camshaft housing and heads off the cylinders as one unit.



The state of the heads, they have seen some action alright!



The pistons weren't much better.



The amount of gunk build up is unbelievable! I'm amazed this thing even ran!



Cheers.

-Kav.

Last edited by kav; 11-14-2017 at 09:05 PM..
Old 01-20-2016, 08:00 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #39 (permalink)
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Kav, great work and great documentation. In your intro you mentioned something like "I'm not very mechanical". I think you are more mechanical than most mechanical people I know. I look forward reading about your progress.

Juergen
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Old 01-20-2016, 10:20 AM
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