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Originally Posted by kav View Post
Great advice! Thanks!
One more thing. I would strongly suggest you have your daughter wear a respirator when using the blast cabinet. Young lungs need all the protection you can give them.
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Old 12-17-2017, 01:15 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #121 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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Brake Calipers

Merry Christmas! Happy Holidays!!!

Unbelievably I found time this week to not only work on The Canary but also post an update to the thread!

It's time to upgrade the brakes on The Canary and go from solid rotors front and rear to something a little different. The rears will get a set of used SC calipers from Easy's salvage in the East Bay (so sorry to see that place close!) and new ventilated rotors.

The front will get a set of S-Calipers ... from an Alfa Romeo?! I explain it all in the video!
I found the Brembo Milano / 75 Alfa Romeo calipers used online. I ordered all the parts from Eric Shea at PMB Performace. Eric is a super nice guy and was extremely helpful as I had no idea what I was doing!




As they came on the car back in 1969. Solid rotors and the M-caliper. We can do better than that!



I bought a pair of used rear M calipers from a 911SC from Easy's salvage in the East Bay. SC on the left and original on the right, the only difference I can see is the spacer and retaining hardware but these should do the job.



I remove the brake pads and push out the pistons with compressed air through the fluid feed hole, yes it was a pain in the ass!



I take the caliper apart and inspect all the parts. The pistons look in decent shape. I will replace all the seals etc



After a scrub in the parts washer it's into the blast cabinet



Everything blasted (the retaining rings for the dust shields come in the rebuild kit). I will send all the parts out for Yellow Zinc and black oxide plating.



Vented rotors in the house!



Everything is back from plating and the rebuild kits are here. Time for some assembly!



Pistons pressed into the caliper, new seals from Eric.



I torqued the caliper halves back together in a 1-2-3-4 order at 7ft lbs and again in a 2-3-1-4 pattern at 17ft lbs. The finished result looks great!

Old 12-23-2017, 10:46 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #122 (permalink)
kav kav is offline
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The Brembo Milano/75 Alfa Romeo aluminum S-caliper bolts right up to my struts! The bolt spacing is 3" and the offset for the vented rotor is perfect! The piston is 48mm so it works with your 19mm master cylinder! If I wanted to go with a Porsche S-caliper I would have to swap out my front struts as the bolts spacing is 3.5". This seemed like a great option for the price.



Removing the pistons with compressed air, these came out much easier than the rears



Splitting the caliper. I want to change the plating to yellow zinc to match the rears.



All blasted, I was careful not to blast the cylinder bores.



Back from plating. yellow zinc looks good on these! The bolts got black oxide.



The pistons had corrosion and pitting, will get some new ones from Eric at PMB



New pistons installed



New half seals. Being very careful putting these back together.



Torque pattern 1-2-3-4 at 10ft lbs, 2-3-1-4 at 20ft lbs then again 2-3-1-4 at the final 30ft lbs.



New retaining hardware from Centerline International. They look great and I can't wait to see how they perform on the car!



Cheers!

-Kav

Last edited by kav; 12-24-2017 at 10:40 AM..
Old 12-23-2017, 11:04 PM
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Great post Kav. Eric has my SC calipers at the moment but now I'm a bit sad I didn't rebuild them myself. Love watching your beautiful videos.
Old 12-24-2017, 04:23 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #124 (permalink)
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looks great well documented. I am curious to see how the yellow plating holds up to the heat and brake dust versus a standard red or black powder coat.
Old 12-24-2017, 06:17 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #125 (permalink)
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Kav - excellent videos!

Would love to swing by over the holiday and check out the progress. As mentioned a few Porsche guys in the area were keen to see it as well. You have a growing fan club :-)
Old 12-26-2017, 08:43 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #126 (permalink)
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Hey Bruce I PM'd you!

-Kav.
Old 12-27-2017, 12:22 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #127 (permalink)
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Love this build! Following along as I'm a fair bit behind you. Keep up the high production posts! the video was awesome!
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Old 12-27-2017, 03:16 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #128 (permalink)
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Easy's

I headed to the monthly Porsche meet at Easy in the East Bay (first Saturday of the month) as I try and do every month to chat with nice folks and get inspired as I always do.

Saturday was possibly the last 'real' Easy meet in it's current form. Jim has sold the business, (good luck Jim!) the building and is in the process of clearing house. It's so sad to see that place go but apparently the meets will still take place and Jim, John etc will attend so I will always try and get my ass down there if I can. John jokes every time I go down there asking me when the Canary is going to be parked out front, I always reply, 'soon John soon!'.

If you see me there please say Hi!

Cheers

-Kav.





Terrible shadows, sorry!



One day the Canary will be parked here!









Speedster with no interior. Guy drove it away sitting on the floor!



We love looking around the shop at all the parts.



We bought shirts!

Old 01-08-2018, 09:58 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #129 (permalink)
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Front Hubs and Rotors

With the calipers all re-built it's time to swap out the solid brake rotors for the Zimmermann ventilated disks. While I'm in there I'll replace the wheel bearings and change out the studs for the 80mm replacements. Here goes:

I made a little video of the process:



All the new goodies, Zimmermann vented disks, new wheel bearings, Brembo Milano S-caliper etc.



The solid rotor and M-caliper



Removing the hub is pretty straight forward.



Removing the outer wheel bearing, it has some wear and needs replacing



The grease seal or oil seal? will get pressed out on my new 20 ton press



I found a socket just the right size to push out the outer bearing race.



Pressing out the outer race



The outer race is out and pressed onto the socket!! I can press that off!



The inner race needs to come out next. I will heat up the hub and hammer it out with a punch



Being very careful not to gouge the hub! I tap out the inner race, yes it was a PITA!

Old 01-10-2018, 12:02 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #130 (permalink)
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Pressing out the old wheel studs.



Cleaned up the hub in the parts washer then gave it a good blast, I didn't blast the inner surfaces.



I made a primitive tool from some an electrical conduit part to push the races into the hub. Outer race first.



The outer gets pressed in.



Then the inner.



Then the 80mm wheel studs go in.



I pack the new wheel bearings by hand. It's amazing how much grease you can get in there!



The inner wheel bearing in place.



I press in the grease seal.



I reunite the hub to the new rotor and torque the bolts down to 17ft lbs.

Old 01-10-2018, 12:15 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #131 (permalink)
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The dust shield hit the Brembo caliper, a little trimming is needed!



Now it fits!



I'm not going to upgrade the front suspension before the engine rebuild so I will paint the dust shields for now. I will get them plated yellow zinc later on.



I heard that white vinegar cleans dirt and rust of metal so I gave it a go on the hardware.



I steeped it overnight and gave it a few shakes, it turned out great! I neutralized the acid process with a dip in a baking soda solution. I will have to plate it down the line as it will rust quickly but it will do for now.



Dust shield goes on.



Hub and rotor back on. I tightened the hub nut enough so that I can still move the washer behind it but there is no play in the hub.



All done! Very exciting!

Old 01-10-2018, 12:27 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #132 (permalink)
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That is exactly how I envision doing this type of setup, but time and patience is always my downfall. Again, very nice work.
Old 01-10-2018, 05:48 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #133 (permalink)
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As usual Kav does a great job of sharing his progress. Fantastic work!

Some things to keep in mind with the front hubs if you don't mind me sharing:

The races come out of the hub with heat quite easy if they have been installed cleanly in the past. Just heat up the hubs in an oven (a toaster oven works great and you can keep it in the garage) and then the races tap out of the bores very easy with a hammer and punch. These aluminum hubs are a really good heat sink and it takes quite a lot of heating with a torch to get enough heat into them. Also, a brass punch is a nice one to have to avoid damaging the aluminum hub surface if you miss the mark with your hammering. It's easy to miss..........

Be careful pressing in the races because installing them cold/room temperature can force the race to "smear" the precision bore of the hub. It's best to heat the hubs and the races almost drop right in. Because a bore that has been smeared is a real challenge to install races the next time.

Really no need to press the grease seal into the hub. But the press definitely does a nice job! The grease seal fit is a loose press fit and you can knock it in place with a rubber mallet. You don't even need a socket to drive it in. You can just hit it on opposing sides with a rubber mallet.

The wheel studs don't need a press to remove them. I'm not saying Kav shouldn't have used a press. Just saying that guys who don't have a press available to them can use the bench vise if it's got a large enough jaw width. I use a suitable socket (I think it's either 21mm or 22mm) on the back side of the hub to support it, and also allow the base of the stud to pass into it, and then I put an old steel lug nut on the end of the stud. Crank away on the vise lever (you really don't even need a cheater/extension bar) and the stud will push out.

To install the studs I just use a healthy application of anti seize paste on the threads and a regular M14x1.5 nut to draw the stud into the splined hole. I use some spacing washers on the stud to give the nut a sacrificial surface to bear on. You don't want to have the nut bearing on the machined surface of the hub where the wheel seats.

It's a good idea to "index" your stud before you install it so the stud's splines don't cut in a different location and loosen the fit. You can feel the stud sort of click into place if you rotate it a bit while you lightly push the stud into the hole with your hands. Once it clicks and sets into place, you're lined up and ready to pull the stud into the hole

Kav,

I would check the threads on your spindle or check the nut. Once the pinch bolt is loosened and you back off the nut with a wrench (usually you don't even need the wrench), the nut should spin off with your fingers very very easily.
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Old 01-11-2018, 10:28 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #134 (permalink)
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Great advise Kevin!

I wish I knew about heating the hub up in the oven first, that would have saved some headaches as it was a pain to get that inner race out!

Luckily my races went in no problem cold with the press but if I do it again, oven!

Yes I pressed the grease seal in the hub because I could and was worried about splashing all that grease everywhere with the rubber mallet! We went a little overboard with the grease!

I did index the new wheel studs splines into the old grooves in the hubs before pressing them in.

I will definitely check my spindle threads! Great advise!

Thanks so much Kevin, I'm doing this all for the first time so I will make mistakes or not know of a better way to do things. That's why I'm here showing you all my bits so I can learn and get better at this stuff!

Cheers.

-Kav
Old 01-11-2018, 07:09 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #135 (permalink)
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Those front calipers look amazing. Is that an anodizing finish? I have never seen aluminum zinc plated.
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Old 01-11-2018, 07:23 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #136 (permalink)
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Those front calipers look amazing. Is that an anodizing finish? I have never seen aluminum zinc plated.

Yes they are Yellow Zinc plated, it requires a zincating step first to prep the aluminum before plating.

Glad you like them! (i love 'em)

-Kav.
Old 01-11-2018, 08:08 PM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #137 (permalink)
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Hey Kav,

I don't want to come across as saying you did anything wrong. Many people have done the wheel bearing races cold and things worked out OK. I myself did them cold the first time I did front wheel bearings on my former '87. The second time I did them years later, I found that I must have done them OK the first time. I say that because thankfully the bearings came out of the hubs very easy after heating them.

However, during my recent work on my own '86 Carrera front hubs, those suckers were real pains in the butt to get out even with heating them in the toaster oven. So I had that sinking feeling I was in for a battle during re-installation and it turns out I was right. The new ones just didn't want to go in smoothly on account of the bores being disturbed by previous installation. So I shelved them to fight the battle another day.

I actually have the benefit of remembering quite well when they were previously installed because I was right there by my friend's side (RIP Mark ) in his garage & basement. I have his car now after his passing in 2014. We did quite a few projects on his car together and I remember how he was cursing that the races weren't seating in the hub. He was also having some runout issues with them installed on the car. I remember him doing a good amount of hammering on the races to get them seated and that's apparently what did the damage.

Fast forward to present day and the hubs are visibly boogered without the races installed and they're unaccepting of new races being installed. So for the time being I bought a set of good used hubs and I will try to machine the hubs in an attempt to clean up the bores

So i'm just offering another way to approach the bearing replacement, should people find themselves in a pickle if the cold replacement goes sideways. Stop, take a close look at the bores, clean up any disturbance in the bore created by trying to drive them in cold (and apparently a bit crooked) and then use the oven method to expand the aluminum hub. Also helps to put the races in the freezer for several hours.

Growing the hub with heat and installing the races freezing cold works well but you have to work fast. Because once you drop the races in there, they start warming up quite fast! The tool pictured below or a properly sized socket/pipe/whatever is the winning ticket to make sure you get the race going in as square as reasonably possible right from the start. Because once it goes crooked, it's too easy to think let's just keep going and it'll straighten itself out. That's a recipe for "smearing" the bore because the race doesn't straighten out until it (hopefully) bottoms out. Better off stopping when you first see it's not going fairly easy, knock the race back out of the hub, and start over again.



Keep up the good work dude and thanks for sharing!
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Last edited by KTL; 01-12-2018 at 12:02 PM..
Old 01-12-2018, 11:52 AM
  Pelican Parts Technical Article Directory    Reply With Quote #138 (permalink)
 
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