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ghiaholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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Rear Wheel Bearing Success

After a recent 300 mile roadtrip, the rear wheel bearing noise in the '85 got significantly worse, so continued replacement procrastination was not an option. I spent hours pouring over every post on the topic and finally got up the nerve to give it a go.

Here are some step by step photos of the process and some observations.

After removing the wheel, I set the parking brake and loosened the axle nut. Next time I'll do this before I remove the wheel. 3/4" drive is recommended.



Next the brake caliper has to be removed and tied up out of the way, and then the brake rotor can be removed.



Next, the CV/axle assembly has to come off. My setup looks a little goofy but it worked fine.



Then the bottom shock bolt needs to be removed.



So far the job was pretty easy. Next post: removing the %*$(# hub.

Old 09-04-2015, 07:01 PM
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The bearing must be original because it did NOT want to let go of the hub. I pryed, banged, made a slide-hammer, said some bad words, then pryed some more. It wouldn't budge. In the end what worked for me was a splitting maul - the kind you use for chopping firewood. I was able to drive it in between the back of the hub and the head of the bearing retainer bolts. It was way more force than I'd like to apply to this fine piece of engineering, but in the end, it finally worked.



As expected the outer race came out with the hub. Instead of using a fancy bearing splitter, I broke out the angle grinder and it worked great. What happened was that by grinding it, it got REALLY hot which caused it to lose its death grip on the hub. A few smacks with a punch to spin it on the hub, and it cracked slightly and slid right off. Heat is your friend.
Old 09-04-2015, 07:08 PM
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Here's a shot of the hub with the race ground down. You can kind of see the crack in the middle of the ground out area.



I had hoped that the job could be done without taking of the parking brake assembly, but it's under the bearing retainer plate and has to come of in order for the bearing to be pulled out. It's actually way easier than I though because the whole assembly comes off together. You just have to undo the castelated nut on the end of the cable and remove a couple bolts holding on the dust shield and it all slips right off.





Next post: Bearing extraction
Old 09-04-2015, 07:14 PM
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Compared to the hub removal, the bearing extraction was a breeze. I cobbled together the generally accepted list of electrical and plumbing parts along with some threaded rod and assorted nuts and washers. Then I mounted the contraption and snugged it down tight. After that I hit the swingarm with the propane torch and after a couple of minutes, I was able to walk the bearing right out with very little resistance. Again, heat is your friend.



What it looked like when it came out.



Next post: Installing the new bearing.
Old 09-04-2015, 07:20 PM
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I went with the FAG brand bearings instead of the SKF. Installation is the reverse of extraction. I McGyvered together the threaded rod with assorted plumbing and electrical bits to pull the new bearing in with pressure on the outer race. Conventional wisdom is to keep the bearing in the freezer, so I did that, but I'm not sure it's really necessary. Once the bearing was lined up in the swingarm, I again hit it with heat and after a couple of minutes, the bearing walked right in without fuss.



When the frozen bearing is loaded into the swingarm, the heat from the swingarm quickly warms it up. What is more important is the different coefficient of expansion for aluminium and steel.

The bearing seated tight. A beautiful thing.



Next, and this is really important, re-install all of the parking brake hardware and bearing retainer. Do NOT install the hub before you do this.



Then just reinstall the CV/Axle, shock bolt etc in the reverse order of removal.

I snugged up the axle bolt with the parking brake set and the transmission in gear as the resistance wasn't too outrageous. But for final tightening, I installed the wheel, lowered the car to the ground so I would't put extra pressure on the transmission if the parking brake couldn't hold it. I don't have a 3/4" drive torque wrench, so a bit of math with my body weight and distance (and a small hop for good measure) it's tightened right up.



There's no 2 ways about it, this is a nasty job. The worst of it for me was getting the hub off the car. With that out of the way, the rest was just methodically following the instructions in some of the other great posts on this site.

A quick spin around the block and the bearing noise is gone. Now I can hear the symphony of other noises coming from the 915 indicating that it too will need refreshing soon, and I can hear the faint clicking of CV's going bad. We're never really done fixing these machines...
Old 09-04-2015, 07:43 PM
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Well done and great write up. Thank you!
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Old 09-04-2015, 07:52 PM
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I need to do this soon. Hearing a bearing noise when turning and putting a load on the wheels.
Old 09-05-2015, 04:51 AM
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Great timing, my wheel is off and I am tearing into this tonight. Thanks tons.
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Old 10-08-2015, 05:17 AM
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I have to do this on my 86 930...
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Old 10-08-2015, 06:32 AM
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vageen,

The 930 rear wheel bearing replacement is a completely different ball game compared to the 911 rear wheel bearing job. The 930 has two separate taper bearings that are separated by a crush sleeve that sets the bearing endplay when the axle nut is torqued up. Do a search on the Turbo/Supercharged forum on the wheel bearing replacement. I have a post there that gives the details, tools and parts needed.
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Old 10-08-2015, 07:02 AM
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I used a bearing job as an excuse to pick up a cheap 20-ton Harbor Freight shop press. Has been worth every last cent I spent on it, and useful for a ton of jobs on the car that would otherwise be a massive pain in the ass.
Old 10-08-2015, 11:10 PM
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SIR makes a tool (sold by Pelican) that makes this entire job "easy". Consider buying the tool. You will need a bearing press and bearing separator to press the inner race of the bearing off of the hub. Whole job is a couple of hours.
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Old 10-09-2015, 07:23 AM
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Buy that HF press, it'll pay back in spades. Cost me $60 at the indy shop to press out and press in a rear bearing for my toyota ute... and I have another bearing to press in on the fx so, this press is gonna pay back real quick... and a coupon for this 20 tonner press puts it in at $150! now thats a deal.
Old 10-09-2015, 08:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyodeath View Post
I used a bearing job as an excuse to pick up a cheap 20-ton Harbor Freight shop press. Has been worth every last cent I spent on it, and useful for a ton of jobs on the car that would otherwise be a massive pain in the ass.
Can you describe the situations/projects where you used the press?
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Old 10-09-2015, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarwood View Post
Can you describe the situations/projects where you used the press?
I work on more cars than my 911, so keep that in mind, but it helps with wheel bearings, suspension bushings, ball joints, pins, pressing sockets onto shafts...anytime two things are press-fit together.

I think a big part of it is that it turns what can otherwise be a frustrating, time-consuming job into something much easier. So for the time and aggravation saved, it's more than worth it for me.

Old 10-09-2015, 04:12 PM
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