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Replacing the Oil Thermostat Unit (rear right fender well)

My existing Oil thermostat that resides in the rear fender well of my 1973.5T has not functioned for a long time. With warmer temperatures and running at 200-210F on the gauge its time to get that oil up into the front cooler. Rather then pull and restore it might be more cost effective to purchase and install a new one.

The trick is how to remove the darn things!!

If anyone has had experience getting these off (heat, a gallon of penetrant, pounding, etc) can you share your experience that might ease the pain of removal.

You know they do not function when the pipes leading to the oil cooler up front are still cool after running the car for the day.

Any advise on cleaning the oil pipes after removal?

Thanks
Bob
73.5T
Old 04-10-2017, 08:38 AM
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I recently removed all of my front cooler components, lines, cooler and thermo stat. I fiddled around trying to get the frozen fitting loose from both front and rear fender wells with no luck. since it was all coming out anyway I was found it easier to remove the entire system as a whole and then work on the fitting with it in the driveway. waaaay easier.

the reinstall was a chore, but well worth it. the easiest line to get to was the line from the oil tank to the thermostat & cross over pipes so it all came off from there forward. if you go this route DO not tighten anything upon reinstall until all the fittings have been thread started. this includes fittings and mounting for the forward running oil lines, cooler and thermo stat.
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Old 04-10-2017, 09:14 AM
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Have you soaked them with PB Blaster or other brand of penetration fluid?

Usually the t-stat can be removed with a couple of large size vise grips with a slip over cheater bar. An additional persuader can be a propane torch on the nuts prior to the use of the vise grips.

Have someone available with a fire extinguisher.
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Old 04-10-2017, 09:17 AM
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vise grips? come on now mike... brutal.. if anything a large crescent to not mung the fuch out of the fittings. the larger crescent will have more leverage than a short VG anyhow.
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Old 04-10-2017, 10:18 AM
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They can be gentle....crescent hammers tend to be a bit bulky. I use a shop towel under the jaws BTW....
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Old 04-10-2017, 10:20 AM
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What? I thought it was "Vise Grips..the right tool for Every Job" And now I suppose you're going to tell me that cross threading is NOT another form of saftying those fittings? Cheese us K rice someone please make up their damp mine.....!
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Old 04-10-2017, 11:54 AM
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On my '83 SC I had to tackle this problem to "backdate" the oil lines to facilitate the SSI installation. Here's what worked for me (YMMV):

Hit the oil line with brake parts cleaner and then Kroil if you can get it or your favorite creeping penetrant. I then used a MAP torch to heat and cool the nut through several cycles. Be aware that the oil WILL ignite once hit by direct flame. I was pretty sure the car along with the garage was going to go up in flames the first time I saw them ignite. Keep a fire extinguisher handy. Loosen both oil lines at the 10mm nut in the fender well. This is the one closer to the oil tank, mid-engine. I then wedged a big screw driver handle between them and the frame of the car. This gave me enough room to get a large pipe wrench (with teeth wrapped by a blue shop towel) on to the back of the oil thermostat nuts. I then proceeded to wail on the wrench end with a big a** metal sledge hammer. It came right off. You might get away with a cheater bar over your wrench, I lacked ground clearance on jack stands.

Getting the wrench on the back side allows the jaws of the pipe wrench a better perch to grab onto in the tightening direction.

Good luck. Take your time. Cuss a lot.

- Steve
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Old 04-10-2017, 01:33 PM
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use ATF (automatic transmission fluid) and acetone equal parts 50/50 soak it and re-soak it again and when you think you are done do it again..Heat it up soak it again repeat. Kroil is a great product but I have had better luck with what I mentioned for really stubborn suckers.

I would highly recommend buy the correct oil line wrenches. and then hammer and not try to pull it apart as you do not want to tear the threads...

Take your time....Time is your friend...

Cheers
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Old 04-10-2017, 04:49 PM
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Thanks all. I have heard that removing this unit via the four fittings its a bear, especially if you are working with the car jacked up off the floor. I might consider checking with my mechanic since greater leverage would be achieved if the car was up on a lift. Great "soaker" recipes.

Bob
1973.5T
Old 04-11-2017, 03:05 AM
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Sorry to bring up an old thread, but I need to replace the lines aft of the thermostat housing. This is on an 86 3.2.

Am I correct that the thermostat isn't actually attached to the body and is simply held in place by the oil lines? If so, how do I hold the housing so I can put some leverage on to loosen the nuts?

Similarly, the nut on the line into the oil tank didn't budge. I put some penetrating oil on that and all the other nuts. I'd use heat on it but that seems a bit squirrelly on the tank (and on the thermostat housing for that matter.

Finally, what have people used for wrenches? Seems like a giant crow's foot would be good.

Any advice is appreciated.
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Old 01-21-2018, 08:48 AM
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Take the whole setup out as a unit to deal with it, unless the fittings are actually able to be loosened easily, which is rare.
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Old 01-21-2018, 09:56 AM
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36-mm Oil Wrench.........

Quote:
Originally Posted by PabloX View Post
Sorry to bring up an old thread, but I need to replace the lines aft of the thermostat housing. This is on an 86 3.2.

Am I correct that the thermostat isn't actually attached to the body and is simply held in place by the oil lines? If so, how do I hold the housing so I can put some leverage on to loosen the nuts?

Similarly, the nut on the line into the oil tank didn't budge. I put some penetrating oil on that and all the other nuts. I'd use heat on it but that seems a bit squirrelly on the tank (and on the thermostat housing for that matter.

Finally, what have people used for wrenches? Seems like a giant crow's foot would be good.

Any advice is appreciated.

Pablo,

You would need a 36-mm open or a crow foot wrench to remove your oil line/s from the auxiliary thermostat and oil tank. Before you even attempt to work on the thermostat side, check the 36-mm oil line fitting to the oil tank first. This would be the easiest to remove among these 36-mm fitting. And if you are having difficulty getting this one loose, the rest would a lot more difficult and stubborn to loosen.

Use breaker bar or extension pipe with caution. I use a large rubber mallet instead of long pipes or extension to loosen these stubborn nuts. Shock and impact applied using a big rubber mallet on the wrench delivers the force to get it loose. Do not use brute force or you will break or damage something. Best method is to get the whole assembly out of the car and work done on your work bench or on the floor.

Tony
Old 01-21-2018, 10:35 AM
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When I had to do this to change the leaking oil line, I read and found that while some were able to remove it using brute force, the result was damged thermostat threads so this is what I did.

1) drop the entire line
2) try things like PB blaster and put moderate force. When it did not give I went to:
3) use a dremel-like took to cut the nut, being careful not to damage the threads. I didn't cut completely through, but used a screwdriver to finish opening up. Saves the thermostat threads that way.
4) picked off any material from the nut on the thermostat thread.
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Old 01-21-2018, 10:53 AM
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Not sure what Porsche AG shipped, but I think that all or most SC's and Carerras has the thermostat just attached to the lines and not attached to the car.

I use a large and inexpensive adjustable wrench from Harbor Freight. With this wrench I do not need a breaker bar.

If you have to cut off nut or nuts on the engine/oil tank side, Elephant Racing Products may have a solution for a replacement nut as opposed to buying an entire new line.

Good luck.
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Old 01-21-2018, 11:37 AM
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When you guys say "drop the entire line, am I correct that you mean everything between the oil tank and the front oil cooler? If so, not the answer I wanted, but if I have to.

Tony, I tried applying moderate torque to the one on the oil tank and no dice. I'll keep applying PB Blaster for a week and see what happens next weekend. Is it safe to assume that applying heat there is a bad idea?

Thanks for the info everyone.
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Old 01-21-2018, 11:41 AM
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Harbor Freight 39621 or similar is what I use.



Good luck.
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Old 01-21-2018, 12:18 PM
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Caution.........

Quote:
Originally Posted by PabloX View Post
When you guys say "drop the entire line, am I correct that you mean everything between the oil tank and the front oil cooler? If so, not the answer I wanted, but if I have to.

Tony, I tried applying moderate torque to the one on the oil tank and no dice. I'll keep applying PB Blaster for a week and see what happens next weekend. Is it safe to assume that applying heat there is a bad idea?

Thanks for the info everyone.


Pablo,

If the oil tank is not installed in the car, it is safe to use heat and open flame. But I would think twice using heat or blow torch with the tank installed. The residual oil inside the oil tank could ignite and cause fire you never want to see.

Tap the big nut using a hammer to shock and loosen it. Spray penetrating oil and shock it repeatedly. That nut has to come off now or later. Just be patient and persistent. Do not give up. You will overcome this hurdle.

Tony
Old 01-21-2018, 12:23 PM
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My two cents as I recently replaced the two lines to the engine from the thermostat.

Nothing worked for me. I had good access to the thermostat via the lift in my garage. Heating, oil penetrant, soaking, hammering, nada.


This applies to all four sides.

Finally since I didn’t care about the oil lines, two hours later with a dremmel tool I cut out the line nuts diagonally and even with one third of the nuts these things were hard to remove.
I wish you better luck.
I did apply antiseaze for the next lucky guy.
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Old 01-21-2018, 12:48 PM
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If you don't have wrenches yet, buy the Harbor Freight adjustable wrench, the big one, as described above.

After soaking and soaking again with "weasel-piss" or equivalent and doing this 10 + times, remove the return hose to the Tank first. Then the Feed line from the motor.

Once these are loose, start taking down the entire system along the rockers & front fender until it gives you enough room to have access to the thermostat. Have a helper hold the thermostat while you use your wrenches to loosen & remove the hoses.

If they still won't budge, take a dremel and cut the nuts diagonally as described above. Do this so you can spread the halves of the nut apart.

The threads do not make the seal so if damaged slightly it won't matter. The Ball surface of the Female hose fitting and the Cone surface of the thermostat make the seal.

And yes, anti-seize the threads when assembling.

Good luck.

Len

Old 01-21-2018, 01:25 PM
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Just don't split the nuts on the rocker lines!!$$$$

I got a circular style 1 7/16 from snap on that I use on those 36mm nuts. Like a crowfoot, but round with a cutout that clears the tube. Works great on that inner rear one.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:08 PM
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