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Formerly known as Syzygy
 
Canada Kev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeRRis View Post
Oh and don't forget to order some new handbrake shoes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM View Post
How often do those wear out? I've never even considered replacing these.

Mine went on one side because the mechanism wouldn't centre itself properly and would allow the pad to make contact with the drum/hat. I guess I drove quite a while with it dragging a bit and wore one of the pads. So I got a bunch of new goodies and rebuilt both sides.

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Kevin

1987 ROW coupe, Marine blue, with a couple extra goodies.

The cars we love the best are the ones with human traits, warts and all.
Old 03-31-2018, 11:53 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #21 (permalink)
1981 911SC
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 68
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Well I've got the rear calipers off and apart. One of the pistons is just mangled so I'll have to replace that and am hoping a local shop has one so I can be rolling sunday night. The rest looks serviceable. Lines came apart no sweat.

One thing I had unexpected trouble with was the lower 19mm caliper bolt on each side. I could barely get a combo wrench in there for 16th rotation turns - took forever. Now I'm wonder how I've ever going to get in there and crank it back down, much less get my torque wrench in there (NO CHANCE).

Any secret to that nut? A stubby or a low-pro socket needed? What a pain.
Old 03-31-2018, 02:07 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #22 (permalink)
Formerly known as Syzygy
 
Canada Kev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB
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No secret that I'm aware of. Yep, it's super tight in there. You might be able to fit in a ratcheting wrench, but I can't remember if I could. For some reason memories of having some issue with that come to mind. Maybe the splines on the ratcheting mechanism were too course to really work well in that space. Sorry, no good advice, just some, "been there, feel your pain", notes of camaraderie. Good luck.
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Kevin

1987 ROW coupe, Marine blue, with a couple extra goodies.

The cars we love the best are the ones with human traits, warts and all.
Old 03-31-2018, 02:51 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #23 (permalink)
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old man neri's Avatar
 
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Location: Halifax, Canada
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I use a ratcheting wrench. Works beautifully. How tight? It's a big bolt....tight. I've never used a torque wrench. That being said; use a torque wrench on the top one, get a feel for the amount of force needed, and apply the same feel for the bottom.

Pictures of mangled piston?
Old 03-31-2018, 03:07 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #24 (permalink)
911T '72
 
DeRRis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Uddel, The Netherlands
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Originally Posted by kger View Post
Well I've got the rear calipers off and apart. One of the pistons is just mangled so I'll have to replace that and am hoping a local shop has one so I can be rolling sunday night. The rest looks serviceable. Lines came apart no sweat.

One thing I had unexpected trouble with was the lower 19mm caliper bolt on each side. I could barely get a combo wrench in there for 16th rotation turns - took forever. Now I'm wonder how I've ever going to get in there and crank it back down, much less get my torque wrench in there (NO CHANCE).

Any secret to that nut? A stubby or a low-pro socket needed? What a pain.
Be sure to install the pistons at a 20 degree angle.
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Good drivers have dead flies on the side windows. (Walter Röhrl)

Last edited by DeRRis; 04-01-2018 at 10:07 PM..
Old 04-01-2018, 01:19 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #25 (permalink)
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Plymouth Wi. - Spitting distance from Road America
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Regarding the front hub dust cap, you may be interested to know that putting a hose clamp around it gives you something to “get behind” and pry it off. Go slowly and a little bit at a time from one side to the other. That way you don’t have to damage it by pounding on it with a mallet.
Old 04-01-2018, 03:52 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #26 (permalink)
 
1981 911SC
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old man neri View Post
Pictures of mangled piston?
Maybe a description would suffice - the pad side lip is jaggedly chunked out in more that 75% of the circumference and there are deep, sharped-edged gouges in multiple places on the piston wall which would definitely do damage to the inner seal. This side of the caliper was in rough shape when I took it apart, but it cleaned up very well and I have little worry about rebuilding with a new caliper.

New rotors and lines are on (after having to drill out one flathead (?!?) rotor retaining screw). I'll rebuild the one complete caliper and install this afternoon so all I have to do to finish the rear is rebuild the last half of the other caliper, bolt on and bleed.

I've been doing this project out in front of the house on the street to get some sunshine and it is wild how many people stop and wax misty-eyed about how they are looking for one or their dad had one or someday they'll do it. Great way to meet the whole neighborhood (including the neighbor's 12 year old who I've manage to enlist in a couple of "projects" already).

Thanks again for all of the replies
Old 04-01-2018, 12:58 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #27 (permalink)
1981 911SC
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 68
Garage
Picked up a new piston from Richard at Sierra Madre Collection in LA who just happened to be heading to the LA Kings game that night at Staples center which also happens to be where I work, so he delivered the part personally same day.

I got everything bolted up this AM and went to bleed the rears and MY GOD was the reservoir dirty. Really fine dark gray silt all over the bottom. I cleaned it up best I could and the flushed the rears until new clear fluid came out. I'm worried that this silt is now all up in the master and wheel calipers, but I also figure if it was that fine and already in there, it is either A) already in there, and/or B) fine enough to get flushed out.

Any thoughts on that?

The brakes work, pedal firmness is about 80% what it was pre project - I imagine I just need to keep bleeding until that improves. don't stop....bahleeedin'... hold on to that pedal feeeellaaaiiiannnn'


Last edited by kger; 04-03-2018 at 08:44 AM.. Reason: typos galore
Old 04-03-2018, 08:37 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #28 (permalink)
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