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Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Fayetteville, N.C. USA
Posts: 63
Cylinder Sealing

I would like to know what many of you are using to seal the cylinders to the block chemically speaking (i.e. Curil T, Loctite 574, etc...) I know about the standard sealing rings for stock cylinder sizes but I am currently running larger cylinders 100 to 103 and was curious if there was some supergoop out there that I am not aware of. I lap the cylinders in at the heads with lapping compound and have never had a sealing problem there. I don't have any major leakage, just a little oozing. I don't think I have ever seen a completely dry Type 4 motor for long but every little sealing helps! Thanks all, Ian
Old 11-29-1999, 01:44 PM
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Join Date: Oct 1999
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Ian, This is not an area for any major leaks so you don't need to get fancy. I would not expect any leaks after you lapped in the sealing surfaces. For years, I have just used a smear on permatex to fill in any slight imperfections and have forgone the gasket. This gives you ever so slightly more compression and I have never had leaks here.
My garage floor has no oil on it...
Old 11-30-1999, 06:38 AM
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Au contraire mon frere. The motor that Ian has is very prone to leaks at this area. Because of the size of the cylinders the case has to be machined to the point where there is almost no metal at the studs.
The answer to the question is that I have never seen this size motor stat sealed where the cyl. meets the case for more than a month. One of our local members built the 2.4 and it has never really sealed.

Lots of Gorrilla Snot(silicone).
Old 11-30-1999, 11:00 AM
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You are right Conrad. I have never had any problems with stock cylinders sealing. There is a reduction in sealing area with the big cylinders especially with the 103's where the cut tends to thin the areas where the head studs attach. I don't have a major leak but was just curious if there was some high speed sealant for that application. Whatever the case I'll tolerate the leak for the power I'm getting. Thanks, all
Old 11-30-1999, 12:25 PM
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Ian,

I'm fimiliar with the "type" problem that you're discribing. I had a similar problem with a '73 Suzuki GT550 (three cyl 2 stroke bike).

Ever since this bike I favour using the permex copper (for exhause manifolds and head gaskets) that comes in spray or paste tub. Both work great, however the paste tub works better when you are not coating gaskets. It stays relativally tacky but refuses to migrate under pressure. I'm using it on a head gasket under ~13lbs of boost and no migration! This is what I use on all my case mating surfaces.

The other option that I've yet to see done for this application, but is common. O-ring the case or the cylinders. By this I'm talking a o-ring grove in the larger of the two mating surfaces and a slightly oversized copper wire inserted into the grove. Then the perssure of the fit smears the wire into a gasket. This is common on turbocharged heads so any good machine shop will understand what you want to do here.

Ian G.
Old 11-30-1999, 12:41 PM
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Thanks Ian! I've heard about o-ringing cylinder surfaces from a friend of mine. That may work but it will be a very thin o-ring. The problem is on the 103's. I used Loctite 574 on the 100's with no problem yet. (Knock on wood) Oh well trials and tribulations!
Old 11-30-1999, 05:29 PM
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Well folks, I am always willing to let experience stand on its own, so if you guys get leaks with your 103's, who am I to argue?

Good luck Ian. I'll stick with the smaller jugs, my permatex smear, and a dry floor.
Old 11-30-1999, 06:44 PM
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Sorry Pete,
I didn't mean to sound like a know-it-all. Looking back I realize I may have.

Thats the problem with this electronic mail stuff.

When I started school for mechanical engineering one of the classes was technical writing, from formal project reports to memos and faxes. The first thing the teacher said was "If you are sending things by electronic means always write it at the first opportunity and send it at the last minute, rereading it before you send it."
This way if you say anything stupid you can correct it. Once its sent its sent.

Unless the person right pisses you off, then let er' rip

Stock class is more competitive and less expensive anyways. I use permatex too.



[This message has been edited by Conrad W Peden (edited 11-30-1999).]
Old 11-30-1999, 08:36 PM
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