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Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Dade County, FL.
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WARNING! Replacement steel fuel line leak

It's been maybe a year and a half since I put new steel fuel lines in my car after one of the stock ones rutured. Then this last week I started getting a fuel oder in the car, to the point where I could smell it with the top off while driving. No problem I thought, must be under the tank for surly the steel lines are O.K. Wrong.

Maybe just my dumb luck, or something I did wrong, but the line was so rusted in a 3-4" at the back of the car it broke in half as I took it out. What appears to have happened is: A. I live in Miami it rains everyday, and my 914 obviously leaks (they all do don't they?). B. a build-up of crud in the center tunnel piled up near the rear and held mosture on the fuel lines allowing rust to eat through them.

Just thought others who put in the steel lines should have a look to see how there's are doing. I'm tring to source some ($$$$) stainless ones because I do not want this to happen again in a year.

Old 09-06-2000, 03:00 PM
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I read the tech article on the fuel line replacement and I made some modifications.

I used 3/8" Alum lines I bought from Jegs.

I removed the old plastic lines and the rubber grommets in the fire wall. I drilled the holes bigger and installed the 2 new Alum lines and cut the grommets and install them again.

From there I modified the system a good bit since I have a CIS 3.0 SC engine with a 911 fuel pump. I used -6 AN flexible stainless steel lines and -6 AN fittings for the high pressure lines and the return line in the engine compartment.

So far so good )... but have only driven a few miles as I am still completing my conversion.

Looking back, I think that I would run SS flexible lines from the tank to the engine and back again. This would reduce the number of fittings needed and not to mention the purchase of a tubing flare tool. The SS lines are about $4 or $5 dollars a foot, but they sure do offer alot of piece of mind.

My $0.015 worth...

------------------
Smoke Daddy

[This message has been edited by Jim Smolka (edited 09-06-2000).]

[This message has been edited by Jim Smolka (edited 09-06-2000).]
Old 09-06-2000, 04:05 PM
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I used stainless steel lines on my two 914's. never rust or corode. Not cheap but worth it.
Old 09-06-2000, 08:22 PM
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Where did you get the SS lines? What size/thread ends do they have?
Old 09-06-2000, 09:28 PM
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I used braided flexible SS lines I purchase from Racer Parts Wholesale. They have special fittings that go on the end of the hose (-6 AN fittings). On a Djet or Ljet, you would have to have -6 AN male fittings braised onto the ends of the 2 fuel rails.

At the fuel pump, that might be more difficult since it is plastic.... could crimp the end of the hose with a clamp, but not sure if that is best. At the return line to the tank, a clamp would be OK, since there is no pressure...

IMHO

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Smoke Daddy
Old 09-07-2000, 04:49 AM
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If the braided SS lines referred to are actually rubber lines with SS braid reinforcement sheaths on their outer surface...then all you really have is rubber lines...the SS braids are there to counteract internal fuel pressures, which don't seem to be all that high at ~30psi...but the rubber will soon deteriorate and require replacement every few years anyway. The SS braids look cool though...

Solid wall SS would seem to be a good choice if it can be readily bent to conform to the tight radius turns at the engine bay front firewall, or fittings installed, but the fittings are yet another potential leak source, and bending the tubing is near impossible because it is relatively brittle. BTDT. BTW, certain types of SS rust as well, not all SS is rustproof...I'm not sure which type of SS is used in SS tubing but be informed.

I have used heavy wall aluminum tubing *available at finer plumbing stores near you* in the engine bay with great results. Its inexpensive to boot. It is stout enough to be very durable and resist internal fuel pressures, yet bends easily enough by hand to conform to tight radius turns. If I ever need to replace the center tunnel fuel lines I would probably use this aluminum tubing, but wrap it in shrink wrap or tape to isolate it from rubbing against the body and to prevent it from making noises in the tunnel. No fittings or bending tools needed.

No I'm not a llllawyer but just for the record...because this is pressurized fuel were talking about, enter at your own risk and assume your own Liability for any damage you may have. I am merely sharing my own experiences...yours may be different...
Old 09-07-2000, 09:38 AM
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Well my memory on the types may be a bit off but here goes...

Type 302 - OK corrosion resistance. obsolete NLA (mostly)
Type 304 - most common form seen. Better corrosion resistance
Type 316 - Best corosion resistance - marine use - weldable.
Type 409 - Good heat resistance - almost all SS mufflers are made from this.
http://mmsacc-stainless.com/html/mufflers___tubing.htm
3/8 Foot $3.50

Here is a great article on SS tubes. http://www.chevelles.com/tools/tl4.html

Due to the issues with SS (as in, most vendors dont know what they are selling and the flairs are not that easy to do) I am thinking about just coating steel ones in something rustproof. Any comments?
-Rich
Old 09-07-2000, 02:52 PM
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Golly Rich, what do you think about the aluminium tubing suggestion...I got mine at OSH if you want to go check it out. maybe sheath it in some slightly larger diameter polyethylene tubing, (which is thermoplastic and can be shriunk to fit tight). Its very stout tubing, the outer wall is about 0.10 inch thick. I'd like to know what the pressure rating is for it...I think its used for water supply tubing for refrigerator ice makers maybe...domestic water supplies at most residences are in the magnitude of 50-85 PSI...so it should be ok...
Old 09-07-2000, 04:18 PM
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I used M-B rubber fuel hoses from the dealer, connected them to the metal fuel lines that run inside the cabin from the front. The hardest part was getting the metal fuel lines from the front back inside their tunnel. I probably over paid for the fuel hoses from M-B but atleast I know they will probably outlast the car. No one else locally had the correct diameter fuel hose for the job. Everyone else was inches, Porsche obviously is MM. I used it throughout and havent had a leaking problem. I got the clamps from M-B also. They look just like the original clamps on the 914. Not the cheap crappy screw types that you buy at the local auto store.
Old 09-13-2000, 09:37 AM
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Steve, just a word--the M-B lines will not outlast the rest of the car. They should be replaced every couple of years, just like the other rubber fuel lines on the car. Some of the chemicals in gasoline (particularly "reformulated" gasoline or "oxygenated" gasoline) tend to eat rubber. They do that very slowly, but it still happens. Replacing the fuel lines periodically is simply insurance. Ask JP what sitting in a 2" deep puddle of gasoline feels like...

--DD
Old 09-14-2000, 06:57 AM
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That was a bit of a tongue in check statement, even though I tried to get as much rust off the panels as I could. The rust most likely has only gone into remission. But I hope the will be around for a long time to come.
Old 09-14-2000, 01:33 PM
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I live in the California Bay Area, there are two places here that sell the lines in any diamater. they are hard to bend but I did not have a problem. Flare the ends and you are ready to go.

They are expensive, about $70.00 for 15 feet, but again never rust, and will outlast the car.

My brother works for the R&D for chevron, he does not recomend copper or aluminum lines, gas is nasty stuff and does not react well with both of those metals, SS is the way to go. Good luck.
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Originally posted by JP Noonan:
Where did you get the SS lines? What size/thread ends do they have?
Old 09-14-2000, 03:36 PM
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Some braided stainless steel lines do not have rubber inside, but PTFE (teflon).
They will stand up to anything you put in your tank, period. They might be a little more that regular braided lines, but should last a long, long time.

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Gerald Gore II (Sam)
73 914 350 small block
Old 09-16-2000, 11:44 AM
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And the stainless-steel braid acts as a really good file. Not something that I want in a constricted area (like the center tunnel) next to things that might be important (like the brake lines, or the main wiring harness).

But with your car, it's your call.

--DD

Old 09-16-2000, 05:14 PM
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