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Join Date: Jul 2005
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Fuel pressure

I'll be checking the fuel pressure in the lines this weekend in a further attempt to get the car to run properly. The car's hesitation/bucking problem at anything below 3200rm has gotten worse. I thought I read that the pressure at the fuel lines should be 30psi. Is this correct for both before and after the pressure regulator? I did notice that my regulator is pretty noisy- at first I thought it was an injector firing, but it was in fact the regulator making all of that noise....

As always, thanks for any and all the help!



Also, is there a comprehensive guide for testing electrical issues? I am new to working with electricity, have a volt/ohm meter and know how to test a battery, but I really am clueless when it comes to where I should put the '+' end and where the '-' end goes when testing things like the different ECU connections to make sure it's sending/ receiving the correct information.

(nothing like sounding like a complete novice...
Old 08-11-2005, 03:50 PM
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As far as I know, all the pressure should be between the pump and the regulator. I wonder how the regulator could be making noise though. It dosen't have any moving parts.
Old 08-12-2005, 09:27 AM
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Wasn't able to check the fuel pressure this weekend as no one in town carries a mityvac hand pump with the fuel pressure option, and so I had to order one. (I didn't want to shell out $50 for a crappy shucks model), but pressure regulator is definately making noise. I assume that if there was any air in the fuel lines that was introduced when I changed them that it would all be purged at some point??

I'm still betting it's the fuel pump because the thing just sounds sickly. Just for fun I tried clamping (with my hands) the fuel lines before the fuel rail to see if I could choke the engine, but it just kept running as bad as normal at idle. Maybe just a small amount of fuel is trickling to them- just enough to keep the engine running, and therefore it is the fuel pump, or blockage at the fuel filter- although I just replaced it.

There isn't some type of filter in the tank itself, right?
Old 08-15-2005, 08:46 AM
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I tested mine with a pressure regulator that was made for sprinkler systems ($6.00 at Home Depot). I got fittings that enabled me to tap into the the fuel system near the cold start valve. This worked and when I eventually got a real fuel pressure regulator, they measured exactly the same readings.

Vern
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Vern
'06 Cayman S - Arctic Silver, "R" Springs & Struts, Spyder 19" Wheels, 82mm Plenum & Throttle Body.
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Old 08-15-2005, 09:06 AM
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ok so heres the fuel pressure solver. go buy an oil pressure testing guage. they are sold at auto parts stores, craftsman makes one, snap-on has an expensive one. Then locate the little fitting on the passenger side fuel rail. It is located between #3 and #4 injectors. Unscrew the protective cap and remove the valve core with a valve core removal tool (the one for tires). Find a fuel line that fits the now open nippel and secure it with a clamp. Remember 36 psi is not somthing to play with so be very carefull when removing the valve core. Push somthing into the hole and release the pressure first. Then adapt the fuel line to fit the oil pressure guage. ONCE AGAIN FUEL UNDER PRESSURE IS DANGEROUS. DON'T TAKE CHANCES WITH YOU LIFE OR YOUR CAR.
KEEP A FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND A BUDDY TO OPPERATE THE KEY SWITCH IN AN EMERGENCY.
Another note, find an oil pressure guage that excepts more than 60 psi. this way you can use it on higher pressure fuel injection systems if needed.
Old 08-15-2005, 09:37 AM
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hmm... isn't there simply an adapter that I can find that will fit directly into the tap-in area to check the pressure on the fuel rail without having to remove the valve core?
Old 08-15-2005, 09:50 AM
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Yes there is!!! Simply go out and find a well trained VW technition that kept the adaptor the dealer got in a kit nearly 35 years ago and pry it from his fingers. LOL GOOD LUCK!!!
Old 08-15-2005, 08:01 PM
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