Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > Porsche 914 & 914-6 Technical Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: O'Fallon, Mo
Posts: 5
914 Rotisserie


Does anyone who subscribes to this 914 list have plans, instructions and / or photographs
on how to build a 914 rotisserie
they would be willing to share?

I'm about to begin restoration of a ' 74 2.0 into a Vintage Racer/High Speed Autocrosser, and would prefer not to use jack stands and an auto creeper if at all possible.

Thanx to all who reply and to Wayne and Tom for offering this great service.

Gary Balke
Old 08-07-1998, 06:45 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
John Rogers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: chula vista ca usa
Posts: 5,207
I have seen these in person and they could easily be made or if you have the $$$$ here is the web address of a company that makes them: http://www.accessiblesystems.com/
They have some really good pictures that could be used as a guide. Another good site(besides this one which is the best for 914s)is:
http://www.performancemarket.com/contents.htm
They have links/phone numbers for everything.
Old 08-10-1998, 06:45 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
Author of "101 Projects"
 
Wayne 962's Avatar
There are pictures of this on our site:

http://www.pelicanparts.com/914/914_photo_gallery/david_race.htm

David has made this himself, and I think that he makes these for other people as well. In fact, I think that this one is for sale right now...

His phone number is 310-392-6964. Tell him I sent you...

Hope this helps,

Wayne
Old 08-12-1998, 08:34 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Dade County, FL.
Posts: 1,145
Send a message via AIM to JP Noonan
I don't remember if I'm thinking of the same thing as Wayne, I'm too lazy to go look, but the one I've seen was made from two engine stands. A big block Hemi in full dress weighs about 650-700 lbs. (talk about a "lead sled") so some of the more expensive stands are rated at 1000 lbs. so they should be fine. However mounting it to the car??? If the chassis is striped, as the one I've seen, then weld the engine stand plates to the front and rear bumpers (or something that takes their place) from a 75-76 (they have a stronger metal reinforcement then the 70-74). The problems you have to look for are that the mounting system is strong enough, as is the chassis strength. Also that the engine stands are tall enough to allow the chassis to spin. As with anything else that supports a car in the air BE CAREFUL, a car landing on top of you is not fun. Also as this supports the car differently then how it is on the ground I wouldn't weld in floor pans or anything else structural as the body is flexed and will not stay true. The other ones I've seen work like a big loop. The car is bolted to two loops at each end, think of it as a car bolted to the center line of the inside of a can.
Old 08-12-1998, 01:03 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Garden Grove, Ca., Orange
Posts: 22
Okay, this brings up an interesting point. I too have been contemplating building/buying a rotissere, and it's main purpose is to be able to weld in floor pan sections as well as the reinforcement kit. If the chassis will flex when mounted to one of these, how does one ensure the proper configuration? Are there some sort of braces you can bolt-in prior to mounting?

Help, I'm confused?
Old 08-12-1998, 03:04 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Santa Clara
Posts: 373
Same here..I got a new floor pan ready to go.
Anyone else done this or is about to?
-Rich
Old 08-12-1998, 04:52 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #6 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Dade County, FL.
Posts: 1,145
Send a message via AIM to JP Noonan
Check out "The Sermons Of Bob Hoover" on type2.com he talks about taking the body off a bug or van to fix the floorpans.
I only mentioned the flex problem because I know of someone who had pans welded into his Ghia, and afterwards the doors and top didn't fit right. I "think" by welding in braces across the door openings and crisscrossed through the interior with some braces should work. However I don't know that it would work on a rotisserie too well, I plan on using 6-ton jack stands (because they are taller then the 2-ton type) and a "Hi-Lift" jack. I'll do most of the welding from the inside of the car. The problem I have is that not only are the pans rotted out (my seat is mounted to plywood at the moment) but also the bottom inside corner of the clamshells, the bottom of the center tunnel, and the back wall. There is nothing left to weld to, and without the pans very little rigid structure. I'll have to fabricate some sort of angle on a sheet metal brake. Although it may seem simpler to replace the whole pan when people fix pans on domestic cars they buy the whole pan (for example) and cut out the part that they need and either butt weld or recess the original pan with special pliers and overlap the pieces.
Another option may be to do the pan in sections; front, middle, back.
Old 08-13-1998, 01:45 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #7 (permalink)
Administrator
 
Dave at Pelican Parts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Silly-Con Valley
Posts: 14,063
Garage
Send a message via AIM to Dave at Pelican Parts Send a message via Yahoo to Dave at Pelican Parts
Unfortunately, the bodies of the "typical" air-cooled VWs don's have much in common with the body of the 914.

The Type I and Type III cars in particular have their body panels bolted onto the floor pan. You "simply" remove all the bolts and the panels come off. (It actually isn't that simple, but I digress.) The frame provides most of the structural strength of the car chassis.

The 914 has unibody construction, and all of the panels are welded together. That makes replacing panels somewhat more difficult. The body panels themselves give the car most of its structural strength. Which makes keeping the body straight a little more complex as well.

On the other hand, I have heard that you can build braces for the body (the cockpit in particular) and bolt them to the door mounts, and they will keep the body straight. Of course, that assumes the door jambs are in good shape, which is not always the case. If they are not, the bracing question gets even more interesting.

Good luck with it!

--DD
Old 08-17-1998, 09:07 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 1969
Location: Garden Grove, Ca., Orange
Posts: 22
So, the windows roll up, the top is on, the door gaps are even top to bottom (front and back), ...then, one could bolt a strap at the door-to-body joints and place a brace from door to door (across) ...and that should do it , right????????

Where are the body shop guys when we need them?
Old 08-17-1998, 07:05 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #9 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:15 PM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.