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Join Date: Oct 1998
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Posts: 6
Stubborn Axle Nut

How about that castellated axle nut? Mine's a 30mm hex and not a 36mm as is stated in the Lash manual.
Might as well have been. I've discovered the torque limit of a few of my tools without wanting to.
I've followed the procedure correctly but so far have only succeeded up to the part on removing the cotter pin.
Any tips or suggestions on (safely) removing the castellated nut? Talk about torqued-on!
Old 10-10-1998, 02:18 PM
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If I didn't know better (actually I didn't) I would have sworn that sucker was welded on the first time I took it off. I was working at a NAPA at the time and it took a good 15 minutes of constant banging with a 3/4" impact gun to get it off. Then of coarse to see if it was hot I touched it, and damn near burned off my fingers. I guess the heat of the gun banging away helped. On another 914 I had to use a "manual" impact driver, they cost about $20. It looks like a fat screw driver, you can either put a socket or a bit into it (they work great for the sheet metal screws on the engine too) and smack it with a hammer. In the case of the axle nuts you need a second person (preferably someone who likes you and is competant) to hit the impact driver with a sledge hammer. Even then it is not easy, and I think the nuts had been off before. Maybe heat would help but then I would guess you risk cooking the grease in the bearings.

Now for the fun part, after the nut comes off, the stub axle pops out right? WRONG. There is a small dent in the center of the stub to center a punch, again get out the Polish persuader and get Mid-evil. It won't take as much effort but is still a pain.
Old 10-10-1998, 03:53 PM
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It seems like a few things tend to make axle nuts a bear to get off: internal galvanic corrosion of both threads, rust(usually not too visible), over torqueing the last time it was assembled especially if the hole doesn't line up just right, etc. I usually use a 1/2 in drive bar (sears) and eight feet of black iron pipe with helper. Always a tremendous bang when it comes loose and most always results in a broken breaker bar, but I get a new one free! When I reassemble, I use high temp moly grease and lube the threads well. I forgot to mention earlier, I always brake the nut loose with the car on the ground so as not cause any possible damage to the tranny from the stress of breaking the nut loose.

[This message has been edited by john rogers.]
Old 10-11-1998, 06:04 PM
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The solution came only after using a 3/4-inch drive impact-grade socket, extension and
T-bar
arrangement with about 5 feet of steel pipe as leverage. Total cost: about $50. After
applying a very good deal of torque, enough to make the tire "squirm" significantly,
there was a "snap!" and the nut was loose.
And now, on to the drive shaft with drift and hammer.
Thanks all for the advice.



Old 10-20-1998, 12:05 PM
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One more thing if you haven't had the plesure of removing the CV joints before. The joints are held to the half shafts with 4(? maybe 6?) socket head looking bolts. WARNING, if they are original they are not 6 point allen type bolts they are 12 point, and require a special tool. First clean the inside of the head with brake cleaner. Then try the tool, if it won't budge (thet never do) use vise grips on the outside of the head and "break" it loose. Good luck. Oh and don't forget to but new gaskets (my car didn't even have them) for the CV joints ($0.50 ea.) and while you're at it check out the boots ($6-$10 ea.) and re-pack the joints (I think 3oz of grease per joint).
Old 10-20-1998, 03:09 PM
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The CV Joints are held on by 4 bolts and 2 roll pins. Ones without any roll pins are usually VW (Bug? Bus?) CVs and are not quite right for the 914. They tend to work loose.

The stock fasteners are M8 "triple square" bolts. They do look like a 12-point Allen screw, but DO NOT USE an Allen wrench. It will strip the hole. The angles on the "points" of the triple-square are all 90 degrees, versus 120 for an Allen socket.

Easiest way to get the tool for the CVs (and for the fan, uses the same fasteners) is to go to a VW Bug specialty shop and ask for a "CV Joint socket". The same fastener is used on Bugs.

The first time I loosened mine up, I rotated the wheel to get reasonable access to the particular bolt, then set the parking brake HARD to keep it from turning. Then I hosed the bolt off with Liquid Wrench, then pushed the socket into the bolt. Then THUMPED it in with a hammer. Then leaned on the end of the ratchet. No problem.

Many people, including my mechanic, feel that the gaskets aren't necessary. Without them, though, the joints tend to toss out a little bit of their grease.

Use new wavy washers if you can find them when you reinstall. And torque to the correct spec--I think it's 23 or 32 ft-lbs. Check your manual.

Hmm, a bit off-topic from the Axle Nut--but what the heck.

--DD
Old 10-21-1998, 08:18 AM
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When I removed my 914 engine I found that Liquid Wrench, which is made by Gunk, worked great for loosening up rusted on fasteners. Worked much better than WD 40.

Old 10-21-1998, 03:25 PM
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Now that we are completely off the subject (gee who was it that started that?). I prefer "PB BLASTER" to Liquid wrench, as for WD-40 a majority of it is alcohol and has little/no lubercating value. CRC also makes good products, my friend (a NAPA machinist/owner) uses CRC products in his shop, and loves them.
Old 10-22-1998, 10:10 AM
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Old 10-22-1998, 10:10 AM
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