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Scott S's Avatar
 
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Oil Lines

Hi All -
I am going to be finishing up my front oil cooler this weekend. I have tried to keep all modifications as much "Porsche" as possible and was thinking of trying to duplicate the 914-6 GT oil (hard) lines that run under the rocker panel. Being that my car is a four, I would be running them on the passenger side. Can I use good old fashioned copper water pipe and solderd sweat joints to accomplish this? Is there any sort of chemical reaction that can occur between the copper and oil? I would only be using the hard line under the rocker and into the front trunk, using soft line to connect both to the motor and cooler.

Fire away!
Scott S
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Old 09-19-2002, 12:24 PM
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John Rogers's Avatar
 
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I would recommend using the Earl's braided hose, run through the right side heater box section. I would not use copper lines and soldered joints due to the vibration possibly breaking them and if they are on the bottom there is a good chance they could be ripped off in an "off-pavement" event! Good luck
Old 09-19-2002, 01:27 PM
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I second John's reply, do not use copper, it will get brittle with heat. I use SS lines from Racerpartswholesale.com. If cooling a 6 cyl car, then AN 12 (3/4") is the min size.
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Old 09-19-2002, 04:06 PM
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I second Jim SS Aeroquip Steel Braided lines...
Good place to get them also
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Old 09-19-2002, 05:30 PM
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I used braided stainless AN -12 from Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies (Wisconsin) and ran through the passenger side heater channel on a big 4. I also wouldn't recommend using copper. See posts regarding copper in previous topics on replacement of center tunnel brake line.

Bob G.
Old 09-19-2002, 05:53 PM
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Use the stainless steel but secure it very well and insulate it so it does not vibrate or rub on the sheet metal and wear the paint away. Rust will start when it wears the paint off.
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Old 09-19-2002, 05:56 PM
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Mike Ginter
 
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Even if you did use SS lines, what's wrong with running them along the long where Scott suggested? Some us need to retain heat but still want an oil cooler.
Old 09-19-2002, 06:58 PM
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Summit or Jegs has the the braided line cheaper than anyone.

Ginter,

Run them under the car the same way we run the water lines for the V8 cars. (this little sentence will start a whirlwind of Sh_t)

And here is my answer to the whirlwind.. IF you rub these lines on something... your car is way out shape and you have a lot more to worry about than those -12 oil lines that are nicely attached to the center tunnel of the chassis. Put them in the 2 recesses that run on either side of the tunnel under the car.

B
Old 09-19-2002, 07:06 PM
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Mike Ginter
 
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Thanks Brad
Old 09-19-2002, 07:10 PM
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Play theme music here:

"cause thats what friends are for"

It keeps you from hacking up your nice 914/6.

You end up with a few tiny holes for the clamps you will use under the car to secure them to the chassis.

Our water lines are -20. You'll have plenty of safety cushion with -12.

B
Old 09-19-2002, 07:12 PM
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Mike Ginter
 
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My thoughts exactly. That would definitely cut down on intrusions even better than using the longs.
Old 09-19-2002, 07:19 PM
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The only holes that this will require... is the ones needed to get the lines into the fron trunk area. I personally would use some bulkhead adapters (ala Winston cup) This would really keep things clean and tidy.

B
Old 09-19-2002, 07:22 PM
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Scott,

If you decide to go the "copper" route, use the "soft copper" that's used in residential A/C systems, and go with brass flare fittings instead of solder joints (any descent hardware store carries the copper and the fittings [very cheap too]). I've done residential A/C for many years, and have yet to see a A/C unit spring a leak from heat, pressure or vibration (and there's plenty of both at the compressor). As long as you run something flexible (braided line) in the areas where there will be movement, like around the engine compartment, and secure the copper lines every couple of feet (I can hook you up with some excellent rubber hose clamps if you need them) to prevent movement and chaffing, I don't see a problem. Also, copper is a great conductor of heat which could assist a little in heat dissipation. If you run it underneath the car, I'd have a buddy with a metal break fab a U-channel to afford the line a little protection from road debris.
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Old 09-19-2002, 10:29 PM
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Several "Garretson's" customer cars in this area run the exact setup with copper lines that you described (SpecialK)

The only place they used flexible lines is right before the lines entered the block.

B
Old 09-19-2002, 10:51 PM
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Scott,

people won't like this either... but I used aluminum tubing down the sides in the manner you described but instead of copper...

Its worked on a track only car for about 7 years, no problems... Plust the aluminum also radiates heat well too...

It turns out not to be any great savings though... because of extra fittings.. and its a pain in the .... to run the line and put the fittings on after...

I mostly did it for temp reasons...
b
Old 09-20-2002, 06:43 AM
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SpecialK and Brad,

Your comments on copper tube seem logical to me. I have questioned comments by several people in the past that copper would fail if used for hard lines on our cars. Copper does work harden and fail, but if flexible lines are used at the engine I really don't see the problem. I don't think the chassis flexes so much (even without a cage by Brad!) that pipe runs from the rear to the front would work harden. I have a friend who installed a front cooler with copper lines under the rocker panels and he has had no problems. He spaced the lower edge of the rocker out to allow a little airflow to try to gain a little cooling from the lines. The good thing about copper is that it is relatively inexpensive and most home mechanics can work with it.

Mike
Old 09-20-2002, 06:51 AM
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Wow - Tons of info! Thanks a million for the advice.
-Scott S
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- A pile of British stuff
- A growing pile of German stuff
... oh, and two Hondas - complete with car seats and pounds of fish crackers smashed into the carpet (and seats, and door pockets, etc etc etc....)
Old 09-20-2002, 07:10 AM
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A POC member will have to speak up..

But somebody in SmellA sells copper lines that are FINNED for 911 fron mounted oil cooler lines. The guy specializes in this setup.

I dont recall the name of his business, but they are pretty trick (probably costly) but neat none the less.

B
Old 09-20-2002, 02:38 PM
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In the commercial heating and air conditioning world a fairly common form of heating is a hot water baseboard radiator, which is nothing more than a copper or aluminum tube with various styles of fins attached. This is then placed in a vented baseboard molding located along exterior walls and you have a nice perimeter heating source. Maybe someone in the HVAC bizz could find a good product.

There are similar tube radiators in Jegs or Summit catalogs advertised for mounting along frame rails on rods.

Mike
Old 09-21-2002, 04:54 AM
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Mike, there's an interesting concept!

Modify your rockers to accept a 3' or so finned baseboard heater element (the electric one's are oil-filled). Louver the rockers the length of the element with the openings facing aft, and leave a gap at the bottom to let the air flow through the fins, and out the louvers. With a small heater element on each side you would probably get some pretty descent cooling, at least while you're cruising down the road. Well, it looks good on paper anyway


If electricity comes from electons, does morality come from morons?
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Old 09-21-2002, 12:33 PM
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