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Additional oil cooler

I have a 6 engine that has been uprated to 2.2 with E cams,the temp gauge keeps edging the red part of the gauge ,I e been told by the guy who rebuilt the engine that I probably need another oil cooler,can you only have these fitted in the front boot space or are there other places in the engine bay that they can be fitted
Hope this makes sense
Thanks Brian
Old 05-08-2018, 05:02 AM
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Hi Brian - take a look at the link below to an earlier thread where this is discussed. I would also recommend sending Dave at Pelican Parts a PM, as he is the 914 expert and will be able to help you with any further questions.

External oil cooler
Old 05-08-2018, 10:15 AM
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No PM needed; I read this board pretty regularly.

First, make sure that your temperatures actually are too high. It isn't that uncommon to have mismatched gauges/senders, and the readings can be fairly far off in some combinations.

Next, make sure that all of the engine tin is present and in good shape, and the seals around the engine tin are good and you don't have any large holes.

The general consensus is that most 911 engines in a 914 chassis do not require an extra oil cooler until you get up to about the 2.7 liter size. I am sure there are exceptions, as there are to most rules, but it does make me think that verifying the actual temperature and the operation of the cooling system is a good idea.

Oil coolers work best when they have clean, cool, high-pressure air at the inlet, and lower-pressure air at the outlet. And good ducting between those. The best source for cooling air is found at the front of the car, which is why the factory GT cars ran coolers up front with ducting to exhaust air from the cooler under the car.

That's not the only place a cooler can go; there can be other constraints that dictate other locations. In my case, I have the cooler located under the rear trunk floor next to the transmission. It sees lower-pressure air that has been warmed by the heat exchangers, so it isn't exactly a great location. But it does help, especially when the electric fan is on, and it met my personal requirement for not cutting the chassis.

I also know people who have put a cooler on the underside of the engine lid. Flow isn't that great, even with the engine cooling fan pulling air into the engine bay, because the air can go around the cooler instead of through it. It also slightly pre-warms your cooling air and induction air, which isn't necessarily great. But it is pretty straightforward to plumb (on a four-cylinder car at least!) and the install is simple and requires no cutting of the chassis.

I have also seen other installations, ranging from out in front of the front bumper (that made me nervous about the idea of parallel parking), to in the middle of a rear spoiler.

All of the designs offer advantages and disadvantages.

--DD
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Old 05-09-2018, 12:38 AM
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external oil cooler




This was my solution for a 2.2 S motor. The hoses are 300 PSI, 1" diameter, and used on heavy construction equipment. Since the hoses are concealed I didn't feel it necessary to use braided Aeroquip type lines. They are routed under the driver's side rocker and follow the contour of the wheel arch, entering the front trunk via holes placed just behind the front bumper mount. The cooler is connected to a 170 degree thermostat mounted on the lower firewall, and a 24 row radiator style cooler. A small notch was cut in the top of the stock front metal valance and air passes to the cooler by just removing several of the round rubber "plugs" in the front pan area. The result is barely visible looking from the front of the car. A few 2" round holes were cut in the bottom of the pan and the area was enclosed using aluminum sheets configured to fit. Metallic tape (which is not shown in the photos) like what is used in HVAC installations was used to seal any gaps in the cooler housing. Sections of window screening were used to cover the intake and exit air holes. Temp rarely gets much above 180 degrees (I have a 911 style dash installed with 911 gauges) and has been in the car for many trouble free years. Last pic is of the passenger wheel well which has the AC lines configured similar to the oil lines - both are under ABS arch guards and protected from road debris.

And yes - that is a VPC 914-4 AC system installed for use in a 914-6 which is a separate story! If anyone is interested in doing something similar I'll be happy to share that adventure! BTW it puts out 38 degrees at the vent - heaven in the summer without loss of heater and/or holes in the firewall to accommodate a compressor!! Cheers, Scott
Old 05-10-2018, 03:33 PM
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Hi Dave, I have gaps all around my tin wear in the engine bay of my 914-6 conversion ,would this contribute to over heating in my engine and if so what type of temp differences are we looking at
Thanks Brian
Old 05-11-2018, 01:10 PM
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It could contribute to your overheating problem. It certainly isn't helping matters!! I don't know how many degrees difference it would make--the answer is almost certainly "depends on a lot of things". You certainly don't want to have the cooling system picking up air that has been heated by the engine and/or the exhaust to do its cooling with.

So my suggestions are: Verify the gauge calibration, correct the engine tin sealing, and see what effect that has on temps. Also double-check your mixture and ignition timing.

If none of that gets temps to a range you like, then consider the extra cooler.

--DD
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Old 05-12-2018, 04:49 PM
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