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Another potential oil leak can come from the engine oil cooler. There are three green seals that I replaced. I spent some time cleaning here as well.













In anticipation of adjusting the valves, I removed the valve covers on one side before I ran out of time. To get the upper valve cover off, I had to loosen the oil line for the pressure fed chain tensioner. This allowed me to rotate it slightly to make clearance for the valve cover. I taped a note on it to remind me to tighten it once I replace the valve cover.

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Old 08-21-2018, 06:22 PM
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Before we left on our motorhome trip, I took the car to my favorite body shop to have a few things addressed. When I initially received the car there was a plastic covering on the leading edge of the rear flares. This plastic covered up a bunch of stone chips. I had both rear quarter panels painted.





Both the front and rear valances and the rocker panels also needed some help. All of these parts were removed from the car to be painted.







There was a dent from the bottom side on one of the rear quarter panels. They had been painted only so there was no protection from rocks being thrown up. The body shop applied German schutz underbody seal to the wheel wells. In this photo you can see the the inner fender enforcement kit that Perry Kiehl installed during the build.




The bumper pads had some cracks so I ordered new ones. The body shop installed them.








I decided I wasn't happy with the finish on the valve covers. I bead blasted two of them today and will do the other two tomorrow. Then they will make a trip to the powder coater.


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Old 08-27-2018, 07:08 PM
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When removing the valve covers, one stud came out with the nut as it was stripped. Had to install a new stud.



I adjusted the valves. I discovered a pair of brand new turbo lower valve covers which I installed. While waiting for my upper valve covers to be powder coated, I used some cardboard to act as temporary covers.












Next I removed the old spark plugs. They showed the car had been running rich with the PMO carburetors. I installed the new plugs recommended for the EFI.






To install the crank fire pulley for the EfI, I first needed to remove the stock pulley. To do that I temporarily installed the flywheel so I could insert a flywheel lock.




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Old 08-29-2018, 01:47 PM
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With the stock pulley removed, I was ready to install the crank fire pulley. However, at first, I could not get it to clear the fan housing. The gear on the crank fire pulley needs to be behind the fan housing. To get it into place I had to loosen the fan housing, raise it slightly and then install the crank fire pulley at an angle to clear the fan housing. Once that was done I could line up the pulley on the crankshaft and tighten everything. As you can see in the photo below, there is very little clearance between the fan housing and the pulley.








Removing the distributor and replacing it with the supplied plug was next on the list. With the plug in place, I could install the crank fire sensor holder.









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Old 08-29-2018, 01:48 PM
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Had to take the dog to the groomer. I sold my 1999 Boxster and, in North Caroliana, you have to turn in your license plates before you can cancel your insurance. Cancel the insurance first and you will receive a nasty letter from the state. So to the DMV I went. After doing some other running around, I got back to the garage by late morning. Since I had to pick up the dog when she was done at the groomer's, I didn't want to start a big project.

During the night I was thinking about whether or not to paint the fan shroud before I begin to install the throttle bodies. It came to me that I might try some polish and wax to make it look better. That worked!! The first photo was taken earlier while the other photo was taken today after I had applied some elbow grease to the shroud.








Charlotte has a Cars and Coffee every first Saturday. It is open to anyone who wants to attend and usually attracts at least 500 cars. Every third Sunday, Cars and Cappuccino happens. This is for European cars only and is by invitation. There were a couple McLaren 720S and a couple Ferrari's among the Porsche's and other makes.

One person there had a Euro 911 with Fuchs wheels. Since I was looking for wheels for the 914 I asked him if they were replicas. They were and I would have know that had I looked at the tire size. They were 17" Euromeister's. I had been considering these wheels and I quickly asked him if he was happy with them and did they balance well. The answer was yes to both questions. A little later another gentleman arrived with the same wheel package and was equally positive.

These wheels occasionally go on sale for very special pricing by Automotion. While i was waiting for the sale price, I began to consider what sizes I wanted to order. While the 17's looked great on both of those 911's, I wondered about the thin sidewall of a 17" tire. I finally decided to compromise and go with the 16" wheels, 8's in front and 9's in the rear. They arrived yesterday afternoon and today I mounted the wheels, sans tires, to see if there were any clearance issues. All seemed well so I called Tire Rack and ordered tires.













For tires I decided on 225/50's front and 245/50's rear. There were about ten options that offered a tire in both sizes. After reading Tire Rack's reviews, I called them to ask about the GENERAL G-MAX RS SL. This is a summer tire. The gentleman at Tire Rack said they had been very impressed with this tire's performance in their testing. General is now owned by Continental which may explain why they did well. A couple years ago I bought a set of General high performance all season tires for my Audi Allroad and was very pleased with them. I ordered the G-Max's and they should arrive at the installer tomorrow.

Gratuitous photos of the cutest and happiest dog in the world. But then I am not biased.




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Old 08-30-2018, 01:26 PM
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I worked all afternoon and accomplished quite a bit. First off I installed the crank position sensor in the holder. It called for a .035 gap. The tightening bolt called for 45 in/lb.








Time to work on the intake manifolds. The studs need to be installed as well as the bell crank. Next up was prepping the motor to accept the manifolds. An insulator is sandwiched between two gaskets for each cylinder.











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Old 08-31-2018, 06:47 PM
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Now it was the throttle bodies turn. First up is installing a retaining clip on each fuel injector base. After oiling the "O" ring, i inserted the injector into the fuel rail. Once it is fully seated, the retaining clip is rotated to lock it in place.









Once the injectors are secured to the fuel rail, the other end of the injectors is inserted into the throttle body. The fuel rail is secured to the throttle body with a bolt going through a spacer.










Next the AN fittings with "O" rings are fitted to each end of the fuel rails.




The Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) in fitted to one end of the throttle shaft.





Now each throttle body can be fitted to the intake manifolds.


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Old 08-31-2018, 07:00 PM
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Wow. Wheels look great and that ITB PMO setup has me thinking about available credit.

Great stuff, keep up the good work!.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:27 PM
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jerhofer, very nice build.....note, on the turbo valve covers....for a 914-6, some material should be removed on the top corner finn. Otherwise the valve covers cannot be removed for valve adjustment while engine is in the car. Cover runs into the suspension ear. Sorry could not post a picture but is an easy google. Best, Mark
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Old 09-01-2018, 04:54 AM
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Spent most of the morning getting the tires mounted. Tech said they balanced well. I had to use a 1/4" spacer on the rears to clear the inner fender. To simulate the drivetrain, I loaded 200lbs of salt in the very rear of the trunk. The car was only lowered about a 1/4" with all of that weight. Stiff suspension!! Lowering it reduced the rear wheel clearance. Since I have room on the outside, I will be using a larger spacer. Once I have the clearances where I want them to be, I can install the correct size wheel studs.









To complete the Chinese wheel configuration, I installed the center caps I had purchased earlier this summer on eBay. They cost $118 for a set of four with free shipping from China. They are of surprisingly good quality. I should have taken a photo of the rear as they are anodized like the factory caps. And they fit perfectly.








I did get to spend a little time on the linkage. Richard's instructions recommend drilling a half inch hole in the right side mount for routing a vacuum hose to the port behind the mount. I also had to install the rod ends on the cross bar.












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Last edited by jerhofer; 09-03-2018 at 03:16 PM..
Old 09-01-2018, 06:49 PM
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I finished up the linkage today. The left side rod ends are attached to the rod and to the throttle shaft. One begins with the rod ends at their shortest length and then two turns are added to the length. Then the rod from the bell crank to the rod can be installed. I will have to adjust it once I have the throttle pedal hooked up. The right side rod ends are adjusted so the throttle remains on the stop.









Next up was installing the air cleaners. The base plate is fastened first and then the hats.









Vacuum lines have to be run from each throttle body to the vacuum manifold. It is mounted by using the studs for the oil thermostat using extensions. Some spark plug wire separators worked perfectly to route the vacuum lines.








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Old 09-03-2018, 03:14 PM
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Looks amazing!
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:47 PM
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One more vacuum line needed to be run from the vacuum manifold. It went to the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor. At first glance, I thought the holes would line up perfectly with the holes on the vacuum manifold. However, they were off by about an eighth of an inch. Since one bolt would be sufficient to mount the sensor, I used my Dremel to ground down the one leg on the bottom of the sensor so it would fit better on top of the vacuum manifold. Wiring to come later.












The manifold air temperature (MAT) sensor needed to be installed into the base of the air cleaner. After drilling a 7/8" hole and installing a grommet, the MAT sensor is screwed into the grommet. Sounds a little strange but it fits very securely.












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Old 09-04-2018, 06:32 PM
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The instructions called for adding a second return spring on both throttle bodies. The recommended way was to drill a 1/8" hole into the air cleaner base. A 1/8" cotter pin is inserted from the bottom and spread out on the top of the air cleaner base. The excess metal on the cotter pin is cut away. The bottom of the cotter pin becomes the eye for the upper mount for the return spring.









Because I was concerned about the vacuum line on the left side being close to the throttle linkage, I decided to clamp it to the fan shroud.



To install the cam sync adapter, the plug on the end of the cam housing must be removed. As recommended, I used a dent puller for removal. I drilled a small hole off to one side, inserted a screw into the holder and screwed it into the plug. By pulling on the slide weight on the puller, the cap was easily removed. I placed some grease on the drill bit to catch most of the shavings.














The next instruction said Rotate the engine through a cycle stopping 90 degrees before Z1 on the compression stroke." When I had installed the new fan pulley, I had the engine set at TDC. As I began to rotate the motor, I was interrupted. When I came back I realized that I didn't know where I was on the cycle. No problem. As I have done in the past, I would pull plug #1, insert a 1/4" wooden dowel, mark it and then see when it was pushed out the maximum at Z1. And this is when my day went sour. After cranking through a couple cylinders, the dowel was snagged by something and a piece was broken off. The broken off piece was about an inch long and about half the dowel width.




I got a piece of clear hose and attached it to my shop vac and tried to suck it out. When that didn't work, I called Richard Clewett at Clewett Engineering, the guy who sold me the EFI kit. His first thought was to see if the #1 exhaust valve was open. If so, he recommended using air to blow it out. Since the exhaust was on, I removed it or else I wouldn't know if anything came out. The exhaust valve was open. Blowing air into it do not work. I have an engine camera scope. After inserting it through the plug hole, I could not see the piece of wood. I also looked up through the open valve and it was not visible there.

Since my skills stop at building motors, I will have to take the motor somewhere and have the head removed to see what is going on. Not the way I wanted to end the day but sometimes things happen. My son works with Todd Holbert (Al"s son) at Toyota Racing Development (TRD). My son texted him about shops that he would recommend. I will be contacting them tomorrow.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:14 PM
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A couple of thoughts:
- Does the MAT sensor have its own ground? Some sensors ground through their threads, and the grommet will insulate those so there won't be a completed circuit.
- I would think about using a washer under the ends of the cotter pin through the filter base. It will distribute the load a bit better. But it would be a Very Very Bad Thing if it came adrift and was ingested, though, so perhaps some epoxy would help keep it in place? Or maybe the spring isn't strong enough to damage the sheet metal there....
- Be prepared for dozens and dozens of comments about "the chopstick" over on the World BBS....

--DD
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Old 09-04-2018, 09:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave at Pelican Parts View Post
A couple of thoughts:
- Does the MAT sensor have its own ground? Some sensors ground through their threads, and the grommet will insulate those so there won't be a completed circuit.
- I would think about using a washer under the ends of the cotter pin through the filter base. It will distribute the load a bit better. But it would be a Very Very Bad Thing if it came adrift and was ingested, though, so perhaps some epoxy would help keep it in place? Or maybe the spring isn't strong enough to damage the sheet metal there....
- Be prepared for dozens and dozens of comments about "the chopstick" over on the World BBS....

--DD
I am not sure about the grounding for the MAT sensor as I haven't begun to wire anything. I suspect you are right that there will be a ground. The grommet also insulates the sensor from the heated base plate.

The cotter pin cannot come through from the bottom as the head is to large for the hole.

A few years ago I bought a Ferrari 348 knowing that it needed to have the timing belt changed. It was critical here to have the motor at TDC. I used the very same dowel on that motor and it worked flawlessly. Since that was a V8 rather than a boxer motor, the spark plug hole was more vertical. I would guess that was why it worked better on that motor.










I sold that car a couple years ago to a guy in California who I still am in touch with. He has put over 10K miles on it so I must have got it back together right. He has been very, very happy with the car.
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Old 09-05-2018, 03:13 PM
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Today was a better day. I removed the left side throttle bodies and manifolds so I could see in through the intake valve for cylinder #1. I rotated the engine so the valve was open. Using my camera scope I could see nothing. I checked again with the exhaust valve open and saw nothing again. With the piston recessed in the cylinder, I was able to look completely around it and nothing showed. I could see that there was nothing caught by the valves. So, I am convinced that there is nothing in that cylinder.

When I hooked up my shop vac yesterday, I used a clear tube to suck from the spark plug hole so I could see anything that might be vacuumed out. I was looking for a piece that was the size of the piece that was missing. However, the dowel is made from some really soft wood and it might have been crushed when it was caught by a valve. So there may have been fragments that were sucked out that I didn't see.

I rotated the motor through a complete cycle and double checked my valve clearances.

So I got back to doing the job that started all of this commotion yesterday...installing the cam sync adapter. The motor is to be in the position with Z1 at 90 degrees before TDC on the cam pulley.. Once I had that set, the next step is to mount the adapter without the gasket. It is recommended to add a witness mark at this time.








With it mounted, you insert the drill bushing using a 4.2mm drill bit. Since I couldn't find anyone handling metric drill bits, the next closest that fits into the drill bushing is 5/32. A little over 1/2" deep hole is drilled into the end of the cam. That hole is tapped with a M5-0.8 thread. The supplied bolt is then bolted into the hole with the head being flush with the cam surface using red loctite. The adapter is then mounted with the gasket. You then check the distance from the cam sensor mounting surface to the top of the M5 bolt. The distance should be 33.0-33.5mm (1.300-1.320). Mine was in that range. Now the cam sensor can be mounted to the adapter. It reads the bolt head as the cam rotates.














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Old 09-05-2018, 03:14 PM
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Another day, another sensor for the engine. This time it was a head temperature sensor. It can be installed on either side on the front of the engine. There are two walls in this area and you are to drill only through the first wall. The shavings fall into a void so they will not enter the motor. That hole has to be tapped with a M10-1.0 tap. I have a pretty good selection of taps and dies but this one was not included. After a few calls, I found one at a local bolt and tool store. To get to this area, the chain tensioner pressure feed lines have to be unbolted. I was out of the crush washers for these banjo fittings which meant another trip to find them. I spent a good part of the day driving around!!











The -6 AN fuel lines and fittings arrived today along with the crimper needed to do the many weather pack connectors required to make the computer happy. My son has an identical crimper but, since he is in the middle of installing the Tesla motor in the '79 911, he will be using his. Normally, I would have borrowed his.



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Old 09-06-2018, 12:52 PM
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Great car and great build

Can you please share picture of how the oil lines are routed in the front wheel housing?
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Old 09-06-2018, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
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Great car and great build

Can you please share picture of how the oil lines are routed in the front wheel housing?
I hope these photos help.
















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Old 09-06-2018, 06:21 PM
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