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Jay, that 17K mile 88 on BaT is indeed a great reference point. I hope it sells for a bunch of money, but it has much less visual appeal to me than the dark blue, low miles example they sold earlier this year. To me the 924 was never a pretty car; some enhancements are needed to make it look appealing.

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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 11-17-2020, 01:43 PM
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The two tone look is nice it gives it a well defined centerline since it doesn't have the fender flares. Some Camaro's and Trans Am's of the same vintage had that look.
Old 11-17-2020, 03:24 PM
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The bottom car is very Audi silver looking. Nah! I had a Fiero gt that was painted red and it fit its looks. I think guards red is too orangy for my taste. I would like to see a more red like paint job on the porsches, that would be the best..
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Old 11-21-2020, 07:54 AM
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Long suffering readers may recall that as received, my car - acquired with zero history - seemed to indicate a life that had included professional care right up to last operator, presumably a kid, and not a very bright one at that. Too harsh? The fuel pump hot wired with a length of green 18 ga. wire from the fuse box, the carpet on the door handle cubbies "color-coded" with red spray paint and the oodles of thick amplifier/stereo wire were all a tell, as were the remnants of peppermint green paint splashed on the interior. Mechanically - other than the fact the car was dead, with a stuck engine - the rear exhaust was the worst, bits of pipe pop-riveted (1/8" aluminum rivets at that), no muffler and the whole, fragile mess hung with basic wire.

Here's a picture from my initial assessment:


Now, the exhaust is the last thing (I think) I need to reinstall (other than the ECM, and a new battery) before attempting to fire up this re-engined car. I'd purchased a good used muffler from my man Jim and carefully rehung all the brackets when I'd reinstalled the torque-tube. Having had a little exhaust repair on someone else's car yesterday as an appetizer, today's meal was to be the installation of my front and rear exhaust, basically the front pipes/cat, and the muffler.

Spoiler alert: the crapulence noted in my first paragraph came back to bite me, and I only got the front section in.

The first of two uses of my big, handsome, square-jawed Miller 180 was to MIG-up the hole in a spare fuel line fitting to serve as a cap for the exhaust gas-test port. The O2 sensor looks relatively new (as in, it looks to have been installed shortly before the car died 12-13 years ago); we shall see if it's still capable of divining the composition of the car's fumes.


With that done, I installed the front pipe, a job that would have been easier with either the car on a proper lift, a helper, or better yet, both. But with the car resting on its wheels, on lifter boxes, I was able to use the scissor lift to raise the pipe, make the connections to the manifolds, wedge a length of 2x4 under its rear flange and lower the lift again so I could get the front hanger connected.

But while I'd bead-blasted all the exhaust brackets I had (before I sold my blast cabinet sometime this summer), looking at the car, then the PET today, I realized that I was missing one of the four little brackets which suspend the rear of the muffler.

This car not having been engineered with an eye to part-rationalization, those four brackets are comprised of two pairs of slightly, but meaningfully different design, and I was missing one of the two that attach to the rear body structure/trunk floor.


Hmmmm...

I did the obligatory compulsive search of my parts boxes, but remembered that with the aforementioned jury-rigged, piano-wired "straight pipe", the car had come to me somewhat incomplete. However, I had two extras of "other pair" of brackets (extras came on my "new" muffler from Jim), so I did a classic "cut & shut" .... kinda sorta ... including the second use of the Miller metal glue gun, and now have an acceptable substitute ready.

This first picture shows the one of which I needed two but only had one (top), a spare of the other type (middle) and the one I'd cut and welded (bottom). The two different brackets each link with a square-ish rubber hanger, so they share the same shaped lips (as it were).


This shows the contour/shape.


As I always like to acknowledge those who are helping me with this project, here's another shout-out to the nice folks at Norton Automotive Aftermarket Division for a VERY useful supply of the 3/8" belts, in this case used on the less-than-perfect but still highly-useful HF rendition of a small pneumatic belt sander. As with many useful items in life, such as Keurig coffee makers or HP printers, with sanders and grinders, the tools are often the more affordable part of the equation ... high quality grinding discs, belts, sandpaper, etc are never cheap, and if you look to go cheap, you WILL get what you pay for. These air "finger" sanders are fantastically useful, and with belts in three different grits, this one has gotten me out of a couple of jams. BTW, Saint Gobain, a big French industrial concern, is the owner of Norton ... you see that printed on the belts, but Norton is still very much an American company, headquartered in Worcester, Massachusetts, not far from where a few of us went driving yesterday (see Quabbin Resevoir Drive thread).


Yes, likely like you, I am always lusting after new tools and equipment, but I'm already fairly well-equipped and grateful for what I have on hand to tackle these projects.

In the next installment, a real "pro-tip" for installing an exhaust ... given to me by a pro!

Kind wishes to all,
John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)

Last edited by jjeffries; 11-23-2020 at 07:39 AM..
Old 11-22-2020, 02:41 PM
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I was messing around with my exhaust on Sunday as well. I found the rear-most bolt on the heatshield was loose, and one of the outboard hanger that bolts to the chassis was loose as well. I would have bet that I was the only person in Connecticut adjusting my Porsche muffler on Sunday, but I'd have lost that bet.
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Old 11-23-2020, 05:22 AM
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Nice fab work, John! A welder is the next big item on my shop list; they're so handy. Waiting for a nice used one, rather than going new off-brand.
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1984 Porsche 944 (Project 1)
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2005 BMW 330xi
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Old 11-23-2020, 10:41 AM
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Chris, between the ad-hoc exhaust fix Saturday and us working on our respective cars Sunday, that was a New England 4-cylinder Transaxle Exhaust Threepeat (Copyright, Pat O'Reilly).

Silver, I had a little 110V Cebora "Pocket Turbo 130" for years. It was A-OK for sheet metal work and would have been fine for that bracket yesterday. It really was a handy thing, and I got it in 1988 when such things were much rarer than today (my Dad bought it to commemorate me finally graduating from UCONN!); it was $500 then, I suppose more like $1200-ish today. It was not good for anything much more, however.

Today's inverter-based machines (as opposed to having a big ol' transformer) are remarkably good, including those made in PRC and able to better modulate for different thicknesses and recipes of metal, and able to MiG braze. The green Everlast machines you can buy online seem to work well, maybe HF's are made in the same or similar plant? My son and his BF Kyle (mentioned in this thread previously) bought an Everlast TiG together ... nice machine. The flip side it that if they take a dump, it'll be an electronics failure and the replacement part's price may equal that of a new machine, whereas my 1989 Miller could be rebuilt from Genuine Miller Replacement Parts if needed, and since it's over-built to start with, likely all it will need would be consumables anyhow.

That said .... man, it is a kick a$$ machine, something you could use to build trailers or rotisseries or big sculptures all day and night. Mine was in use at big landscaping firm's garage; the company's property was worth more to developers so they closed shop. It was filthy and had some bad paint; I paid $500 and then $100 or so freshening it up, painting it (you know me ) and am now generally rather pleased to count it among my worldly possessions. Like my SnapOn tool box - another Craigslist find - I know I could quickly get out of it with some profit, if necessary. It's also a big, heavy thing, not ideal for tight spaces. But, as said elsewhere, my tools, equipment and 911 keys would be the final items anyone would have to pry out of my grubby hands, if push came to shove.

Now I just need to learn how to use that 1940 Singer sewing machine.

John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 11-23-2020, 11:42 AM
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I admit that I was very happy to see three other 1984's this past weekend; I typically am flying solo...

Chris - Statement of the week!!

John, always great progress being made and your SC is quite lovely.
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Old 11-23-2020, 12:48 PM
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Details. details, details

I should stop talking about how close I am to seeing if all the work I've completed so far will result in a functional automobile, because I invariably come back to you with more fussy "little jobs"** I've been performing.

Today I bought a Group 91 battery from the nice guys at my local NAPA, one of whom is a young man with a serious 944 driving project car ... it's an 83 and he's added some nice Lindsay bits (fuel rail, for example) and the quality of his work looks excellent. Added to that, he's unusually polite and helpful ... the Brit in me might even say he's couth (rhymes with tooth), but that stinks of classism, one of the worst elements of the English social system. Rather, I'll just say that his parents obviously raised him well ... and today, that stands out (Grumpy Old Man statement!)


One factory, one factory-then-modified brackets. I scrubbed the rubber bushings with soapy water and used some synthetic grease to aid assembly.

I also got the muffler installed today. It is not light, huh? Once again, I needed the help of my older son, Hugh, to hold up the muffler itself while I made the initial connection at the back of the catalytic converter. Thanks, Hugh. I had to reverse one of the U-bolt torque tube exhaust hanger brackets.


This is where the Pro-Tip comes into play: one time, 30 or so years ago, while visiting my Alfa (and mechanic-ing) mentor, Keith at Alfas Unlimited in Norfolk, Conn., he was installing an exhaust in an Alfa Milano (Alfa 75 for the Europeans in the room), and showed me how important it is to make sure the various components and their hangers all found their natural "set" before tightening things-up. A few years later I was doing the same job on my GTV but found that on the test drive, the car had a new vibration. I hadn't gotten everything into a state of natural relaxation before cinching up the hangers. Remembering Keith's lesson, I was able to identify and eliminate the tension points and return the car to its natural sweetness.


These pictures from the rear undercar area ... they tell some stories: everything back here has been touched:
- transaxle removed, cleaned up, linkage overhauled, fresh Kendall oil
- CV joints cleaned and repacked
- gas tank professionally overhauled
- torque-tube overhauled
- rear calipers rebuilt, discs cleaned-up on a lathe, new hoses
- all new fuel lines and pump
All seems rather miraculous when I stop and think about it.

So, the muffler is in and a battery has been procured. What else? I need to put the ECU back in, but first I see ... the fuse boxes. As I did with my SC, throughout this project I've carefully cleaned any/all wiring connectors, cable ends and grounds I've come across, and wanted to make sure everything within those two fuse boxes was so clean that I won't encounter any unwanted circuit resistance from them. Therefore, I pulled the fuses, cleaned each fuse holder and rinsed/spritzed them with electrical cleaner. I also cleaned the contacts on all the fuses themselves and replaced them per the WSM (i.e., correct fuse rating), replacing a couple of shorty glass fuses that had been substituted in over the years.


Finally, I pulled the fuel pump relay and replaced it with a new, Made in Hungary unit someone had given me (thanks Dave!). As noted a couple of days back, the fuel pump had been hot-wired, so one might assume that original FP relay is dead; it is marked Made in West Germany, so I'll hang on to it for future analysis and maybe, repair.


So, I didn't get the ECU in, but tomorrow is a holiday (no travel: Blessings!)

**"It just needs a couple of jobs doing to it": My parents came from Cambridge, England, but my Mum had an Uncle Charlie who lived somewhere (I can't remember exactly) in London ... in one of those millions of terraced or semi-detached row houses that comprise so much of Britain's housing stock and that you see through the clouds whether you land at Heathrow, Gatwick, Birmingham, wherever. Mum and Uncle Charlie weren't all that close (he was her Dad's half brother, IIRC, in a Dickens-like family story where the second wife treated the kid from the first wife badly ... but the two sons reconciled as adults ... happy ending ), but we did go visit him once, probably in the late 1970's. He was pretty ancient by then but spry and filled with energy.

He took us out to his (narrow) garage, where a tall machine was lurking under some blankets, which he pulled off to reveal something rather like this:


His Austin Heavy 12/4. I recall it was Black and Mallard Blue, but its most noticeable aspect, at least to this pre-teen, was its dramatically yellowed windows. I believe they must have been early safety glass, and the laminate was probably some celluloid film that had become yellow-ish and opaque. It must have been off the road since at least the 1950's.

Uncle Charlie, probably 5'2" and, like all old English men of his time, in a tie, sweater and suit, started recalling what an excellent machine it was, his pride and joy. "One of these days I'll have her going again", he promised. "She just needs a few jobs!"

Happy Thanksgiving to all. Please stay safe.
John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)

Last edited by jjeffries; 11-25-2020 at 07:19 PM..
Old 11-25-2020, 07:09 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #429 (permalink)
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Those details are where it's at; fiddly and incremental, but immensely rewarding in the end.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeffries View Post

These pictures from the rear undercar area ... they tell some stories: everything back here has been touched:
- transaxle removed, cleaned up, linkage overhauled, fresh Kendall oil
- CV joints cleaned and repacked
- gas tank professionally overhauled
- torque-tube overhauled
- rear calipers rebuilt, discs cleaned-up on a lathe, new hoses
- all new fuel lines and pump
All seems rather miraculous when I stop and think about it.
This is plain awesome, and inspiring! More than a few jobs done there. And so nice to be able to put that work on a pedestal, step back, and reflect...

Q: will your Miller and lift get the mention they deserve on the thankful list?
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1984 Porsche 944 (Project 1)
1992 Mazda MX-3 GS (Project 1.5)
1992 Volvo 740 Turbo Wagon (Project 2)
2005 BMW 330xi
2017 Subaru BRZ PP
Old 11-26-2020, 06:45 AM
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We've found some old photos of my 89 944S2, bought in 1995 from a dealer I knew in South Jersey. It had been traded-in with a bad clutch (rubber center failure). I saw it on a work visit and immediately went into full-on, irrational, must-have-it mode. I sold my (exquisite, and first) Beige Cava/Quarry 74 Alfa GTV and put together the funds to buy this.


It was a reckless move, one not popular with my always-understanding wife ... not the coolest move on my part. That said, it ended happily when I sold it at a profit and the following day we used the S2's proceeds (some truly filthy cash) to buy an 89 FJ62 Landcruiser for her and our new baby to drive around in with tank-like security, replacing her 87 Accord LXI 5-speed hatchback ... the configuration of which made putting a big bouncy baby boy in his car seat difficult.

This S2 was "just" a nice, used car at the time, still in excellent condition with that very Audi-like interior scent you guys will understand. It was REALLY nice ... one I'd take again over a 951 for it's torque and willingness to rev. I've written before about how I think the 951/S2 body configuration is the best of the 924/44/68 family.

I took it to a driving school event at Watkins Glen run by a group called Trackmasters, made all the better by the invitation/entry fees having been comp'd by a gentleman who'd been my instructor at the last event I'd done there in my GTV. I drove up from where we were then dwelling, Paoli, PA (best place we've ever lived), and stayed at the famously-basic Seneca Lodge. The car ran like a metronome the whole time; some older guys in the pits-garage warned me to be careful of my rod bearings.


These photos reminded me of something I'd totally forgotten, that there was an F40 running in the same school. I have no idea what serial # or such arcanery, and truth be told, I can't regale you with descriptions of it's glorious sound, neither was I able to grab a right-seat ride. I was able to get demo laps with my instructor-friend, though, in his Carrera and NSX, both track-prepped. He was a finance guy, and his toys suggested he was good at his work.


I also found photos of a car from that event which I do remember, but the images are too rubbish, quality-wise, to reproduce here. Two guys showed up from Brooklyn in an expensively prepped dark metallic red 964 C2 ... many nice bells and whistles, like Fikse wheels when they were still new and not widely seen. During one session, one of the two guys came out of the Glen's "bus stop" chicane and got things wrong. Physics took over, and the session was black-flagged. The remains of the car came back into the garage on the end of a hook. Everything was damaged except one door. I remember the two fellas likely $hitting themselves as they talked about insurance.

Although I did more track days after the S2 was sold, in second (red) 74 GTV, that - the very real risk of destroying an asset which I could barely afford, plus the realization that if I crashed - with only a roll bar and some expired Sabelt harnesses as safety equipment - I could be meaningfully injured, forced me to realize this was likely not a great idea for a (then) thirty-something guy with a lovely wife and (by then) two healthy young boys depending on me.

I may have already described the remainder of the S2's time with me; it developed a final-drive whine, solved by driving from Philly up to the Hudson Valley (via NYC, to pick up my brother for the ride) one Saturday, where Fred Beuselinck expertly swapped-out my transaxle. As previously mentioned, we needed a better steed for the family, so I advertised it in the Philadelphia Inquirer; it went to an odd character who lived deep in the Pine Barrens, near Atlantic City. It had been a fun fling.

John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 11-27-2020, 06:01 AM
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Great stories and photos john. I love the look on the s2. What color was the interior? Hoping for dark blue...
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Old 11-27-2020, 06:04 AM
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Rus, yes, navy leather. Nice Blaupunkt. Cold air, too new for any dash cracks. It was a really civilized place to be.

Someone else asked, did it have the M-030 suspension option? No, but I still found it plenty firm on the highway, and that was as measured by pre-bad-back me. Likely the benefits that would have conferred on-track would have been beyond my own performance envelope, anyhow. I enjoyed track days for trying to be smooth and safe, fast and trustworthy enough to run in advanced groups, which I did, but I quickly learned I had neither the ability nor desire to take it towards racing ... just not how Iím wired. Those Watkins Glen events, be they organized by BMWCCA Genesee Chapter or Trackmasters, were extremely well-run in terms of favoring safety and development but not tolerating aggressive or offensive behavior.

Speaking of wiring, the 924S is throwing me some curves as my initial attempt at starting the car resulted in a decided ... nothing. No power to starter solenoid. I still have some wiring disconnected around the center console and seeing some hacks by previous owner(s). Iím using the factory wiring diagrams to figure out whatís what, and where.

I want to understand it. Need to do more homework before I ask for help. No hurry.

John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)

Last edited by jjeffries; 11-27-2020 at 08:24 AM..
Old 11-27-2020, 08:19 AM
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The British sports car, the Elva, was named as a mash up of two French words, Elle and va, and in she and goes. Well, the 924S ... elle va.

I kinda started her by accident, after a few days' contemplation of wiring diagrams. I was tracing power from battery, through the wiring to the "power center" (fuse boxes/relays), thence to the ignition switch, both elements (electrical and mechanical) are new, and the mechanical side of which proves to be not up to the task.

Explained in more detail here:

https://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1079349-wiring-help-please-87-924s-2.html

Suffice it to say, "one is pleased", using formal Brit-speak.

Thanks to all who've helped me grasp the right troubleshooting strategy.

John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 12-05-2020, 08:41 AM
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Cool man, I like that f-40, Street leagl?
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Old 12-05-2020, 08:54 AM
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Sir Freddie of Texas,
That F40 photo was taken circa 1995-6, so cannot recall if it drove there? Covered trailer and an F-350 more likely!
Best,
John in Conn.
Old 12-05-2020, 09:32 AM
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I drove the car up and down my street today, having first completed some serious snow removal. The PS is leaking ATF, but the car is now in the garage nose first. More anon.

John
Old 12-06-2020, 12:01 PM
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To prove that I haven't merely been sniffing lacquer thinners, here's some proof of the car moving under its own power. It had been sitting in that bay of my garage since being so expertly deposited there by the flatbed driver back July 19, 2019. It appears that I drove it up and down the street with a couple of Post-It notes still attached.


I think it looks SO much better with 16" wheels. These D90's were a huge find. Thanks Rob!

The shop towels under the rear hatch are to prevent it from latching ... I haven't gotten around to checking whether the release system works, yet. I do have new gas struts for it (the Jeep Wrangler fitment) and the hood, ready to install.


July 2019. Note 944 rear spoiler. Beginning of the relationship.

Something that was interesting to me was that my clutch linkage adjustment, made before I'd pulled the engine, t-tube and transaxle, was still good. I'm only surprised by this because when I replaced clutch master and slave cylinders (and the brake m/c), I'd had to make a huge adjustment to the pushrod linkage to get the pedal behaving properly. Of course after that, I'd found that the original, rubber-centered disk had failed, but someone must have tried the mother of all clutch improvements to solve a slipping problem? Dunno, of course, but the new Sachs spring-centered clutch and refaced flywheel felt perfect as I nosed the car out of the garage this morning.

As noted in my earlier post, the car is leaking ATF from the power steering system quite significantly, but after the brief drive (ca. 1/4 mile), I was spent from all the snow removal I'd done earlier this morning, so I satisfied myself with getting the car nose-in to the garage and up on the lift, tidied up my bench** and headed inside to watch what proved to be a highly entertaining F1 race (Bahrain). You may recall that I'd resealed both the rack and the pump, so either the lines/hoses aren't tight enough or my work was faulty.

Regarding the ignition lock being the part that prevented the car from starting, a bit more background: the car came with no keys and the ignition lock had been butchered to allow a screwdriver to be used instead. I'd done some P/N cross-referencing and found that the ignition lock with new keys and switch (aka, mechanical and electrical components of the ignition switch) were common to many other VAG vehicles, from Golf/Scirocco to Vanagon to Audi 4000, and felt rather clever buying the two parts for about $20 each, Meyle brand. Note that the electronic cataloging system used by the vendor (an East Coast supplier - I live on the East Coast - which also serves VW, Audi and other German car lines) did not recognize these parts as fitting the 924S/early 944. Indeed, I did have to drill a tiny hole for the spring-loaded pin which positively locates the barrel assembly within the cast pot-metal bracket that mounts the ignition lock/switch and stalk switches to the steering column and dash; it didn't fit with the existing hole that the original/damaged barrel clicked into. So, it's possible that the replacement part in question isn't defective, but off a degree or two ... and isn't exactly right for this car. It - the Meyle replacement, doesn't have a nice spring action to begin with, but I'll investigate a bit before returning it as defective.

A new steering/ignition lock with keys from Porsche is listed online for $250, although I've found one, on a website I'd not heard of, NOS for $99. Does anyone have one they'd be interested in selling?

** Tidying the bench: I'd noted on someone else's thread that while my car had come with the late model thin-tube exhaust manifolds, I'd used the earlier cast items which came on my pre-owned replacement engine, and that if someone wanted the late model parts, they didn't appear to have cracks and maybe I would sell them. I'd even gone so far as to snap a few pics of them for an ad. Well, today I needed to move them off the (main) workbench and saw ... the 1-4 manifold had a serious crack right where people say they crack. I cannot think how I missed this previously? Anyhow, if anyone would want them for, say, the flanges, to make other headers, they'd be free plus shipping.


Speaking of spare parts: I have yet to pull apart the short block of this car's original but bad engine. The head has a seized cam, two bent valves, lots of corrosion and clearly wasn't maintained by its last owner. The block had an evil emulsion of oil and coolant in cylinder #1, but I haven't disassembled further than that.

Here's my question: are there parts worth picking off this? I'm not wanting to keep the block so that a future owner can fix it in order to yield a numbers-matching car, and over the years I've learned the pitfalls of amassing used parts for the "maybe one day" scenario. The oil pan, I'm guessing, might be worth removing, but anything else? The oil cooler? OR, would any of you want it, to disassemble as a learning project? If yes, please reach out to me.

Thanks for stopping by to catch up. I hope none of you is affected by Covid and that you and yours are all well.

John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 12-06-2020, 05:09 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #438 (permalink)
 
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So I just snuck-in a lunchbreak look at the car.

Three different fluid leaks:
1. Power Steering ATF coming out of the ends of the rack, both sides and big time.. into the gaiters. Clearly, my rack re-seal was somehow unsuccessful. I'll do some research next, but any suggestions as to likely ways I f'd up, please advise.
2. Engine oil leak, I haven't pulled the covers yet, but it looks like it's coming from lower balancer shaft sprocket seal.
3. Coolant leak, appears to be coming from big thermo switch sensor, top left of the radiator.

C'est la vie - I'm not freaking out. I will say that PS Rack reseal was not a favorite task thus far. Get the pinion and quill shaft welded and go manual? Probably would be a bear with my bigger wheels and tires. I like the idea of power steering.

Your feedback welcomed.

thanks, John
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82 911SC coupe, 3 seasons near-daily use; 87 924S, project ... see my thread http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-924-944-968-technical-forum/1046846-johnjs-87-924s-rehabilitation.html Past: 6x Alfas; 01 V70 2.4T; 95 Accord CD555; 89 944S2; 89 FJ62 Landcruiser; 82 Celica; 77 CJ5; 74 Beetle; 67 TR4A; 62 Midget; ?Year Lambretta Li 150 (my brother's actually); 76 Fiat 126 (Mum's); ?Year Isetta 300 (Dad's)
Old 12-08-2020, 10:43 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #439 (permalink)
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John did you replace the balance shaft seal? If so, details? Does thermo switch have taper or crush washer if later presume replaced?

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'91 964 C4 - New Daily
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Old 12-08-2020, 11:17 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #440 (permalink)
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