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Feelin' Solexy
 
Tishabet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
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Brake retaining pins won't budge...

OK, I have a 1989 944NA with ABS and I'm having a problem:
I purchased new brake pads since the old ones were getting pretty worn. I've replaced pads on other cars before (I've only had the 944 for a few months) so I am comfortable and familiar with this task. The problem is this: the "pins" (the ones that go from one side of the caliper to the other and hold the pads in place) are rusted/frozen in place. I figured a few solid whacks with a fiber hammer should get them moving. Well, that didn't work so i moved on to a metal hammer and drift. I applied enough force that the head of the pin I was working on started to visibly "mushroom" ever so slightly, and so I stopped out of fear that I would't be able to back it out if it mushroomed anymore. I already used penetrating oil and such in an attempt to get them to budge, but no such luck. Any suggestions for getting them to move? Normally when something on a car is this badly frozen I'll apply some heat (I own oxy/acetylene welding equipment) but I'm VERY hesitant since I have no idea what might be damaged inside the caliper itself (rubber and such). Would it be OK to heat this part? Any suggestions on techniques for moving these pins? Thanks!
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Grant
1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Vespa Primavera 125, 1963 Solex 2200, 1938 Buick Special, 2008 Mini Cooper S, 2010 Mazda CX-9, 1986 VW Vanagon Syncro Westfalia, 1989 VW Doka Tristar - in the stable
1989 Porsche 944, 1973 VW Beetle - gone but not forgotten
Old 10-08-2003, 11:58 PM
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could you use a small punch and hammer on the opposite side?
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Old 10-09-2003, 12:26 AM
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Well heating would be one way,but I don't know if it will hurt any of the rubber parts inside,worst case you would have to rebuild the calipers,but IF you keep the heat away from the piston end it shouldn't hurt anything,thats where all the rubber parts are anyway. Maybe direct the tourch flame away from the body of the caliper.
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Old 10-09-2003, 12:27 AM
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scheistermeiste- they only come out one way, don't they? I assume so, but since I've only owned the car a short while I'm not sure. The other disc brakes I've changed were held in place by a sort of spring. Half the problem is that the ends of the pins are on the "inside"/car side of the caliper, which makes weilding a hammer and drift a tight situation. How hard would it be (aside from having to bleed the brakes) to remove the entire caliper assembly from the car so I can really go to town on those pins? Could probably work more comfortably with a torch that way too per justin's suggestion.
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Grant
1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Vespa Primavera 125, 1963 Solex 2200, 1938 Buick Special, 2008 Mini Cooper S, 2010 Mazda CX-9, 1986 VW Vanagon Syncro Westfalia, 1989 VW Doka Tristar - in the stable
1989 Porsche 944, 1973 VW Beetle - gone but not forgotten
Old 10-09-2003, 12:33 AM
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just to check... you took the little clips out of the ends of the pins right? i just want to make sure!!! as with the heat, i wouldnt think it would do any damamge as long as you didnt use too much heat. we are talking about the brakes which do get quite hot on their own.
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Old 10-09-2003, 10:33 AM
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When this happened to me I used a pair of molegrips and clamped them onto the middle of the pin and tapped the side of the jaws with a hammer as I screwed the thing back and forth to work it out. If you want to encourage this with the use of a release agent be sure to protect the caliper seals as the fluid buggers this up. Sometimes it helps to push the pads back so the pistons retreat into the calipers to slacken the load bearing on the pins.

You will need to remove the peened over edges on the end of the pin with a file in order to pass through the caliper before you do this.
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1983 944 Lux (manual) 2.5 litre 8 valve na and no pas

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Old 10-09-2003, 11:42 AM
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Molegrips? Vicegrips?

So you just guddle about with the pins.
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Old 10-09-2003, 02:35 PM
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scheistermeiste- LOL, yep, the cotter pins were out. I'm bad, but not that bad :-P
Dark Skies- that's a good idea, in my mind I was lamenting the fact that there isn't enough pin sticking out to get some visegrips on them but your idea of using the middle of the pin sounds good. I'll be sure to give it a try.
Thanks for the advice!
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Grant
1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Vespa Primavera 125, 1963 Solex 2200, 1938 Buick Special, 2008 Mini Cooper S, 2010 Mazda CX-9, 1986 VW Vanagon Syncro Westfalia, 1989 VW Doka Tristar - in the stable
1989 Porsche 944, 1973 VW Beetle - gone but not forgotten
Old 10-09-2003, 02:38 PM
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Tshabet - just hope it does the trick. Probably best to stick in some new pins with a smear of antiseize when you refit.
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1983 944 Lux (manual) 2.5 litre 8 valve na and no pas

1991 944 (automatic) 2.7 litre 16 valve na and pas

"I have only five words for you: From my cold, dead hands."
Old 10-09-2003, 03:53 PM
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"Molegrips? Vicegrips?

So you just guddle about with the pins."

Guddle? That's Scottish for mangle, isn't it?

Yes often times when you're reduced to having to use molegrips because all else has failed then you have to accept that the part will probably be damaged. As these pins have 'shroomed at the end I'm guessing they were junkers anyhow. Putting the molegrips in the middle at least allows the car to be driven to the store to buy some new pins as soon as convenient - the pads don't slide on this area of the pin should it be a little gnarled.

If the pins are just tight but serviceable for reuse then I'd suggest wrapping a half inch wide piece of coarse sandpaper around the pin prior to clamping on the molegrips - this protects the pin from becoming 'guddled' by the jaws whilst the grit of the paper bites onto the pin to give enough grip to work it out.
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1983 944 Lux (manual) 2.5 litre 8 valve na and no pas

1991 944 (automatic) 2.7 litre 16 valve na and pas

"I have only five words for you: From my cold, dead hands."
Old 10-10-2003, 04:55 AM
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Guddle: Scottish for chasing small fish under rocks by hand.

Was conversing on another forum with a Scott and he was using this and a few other words.
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Hugh - So Cal 83 944 Driver Person
NOT a 'real' Porsche -- Its Better!!!!
When was the last time you changed your timing and balance belts and/or cam chain and tensioner?
New Users please add your car's year and model to your signature line!
Never break more than you fix!
Old 10-10-2003, 07:59 AM
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Before resorting to explosives, I'd spray some PB Blaster on the pins to see if it would loosen some of the crud thats on them. A lot of guys are reporting good results with this product.
Old 10-10-2003, 09:51 PM
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