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White and Nerdy
 
Tervuren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: South of Charlotte N.C.
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Another apsect that is important money wise, is the AC system. A dead one is not an easy thing to deal with, but its better on the '86 model then the early 85's and earlier.

A pre purchase inspection is what a Porsche shop will do to check over the car and make sure its either good or bad. Ultimately the way to know if its a good or bad car is ownership, but that can be a very expensive route!
Old 01-20-2006, 02:05 PM
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On the contrary the a/c system on the early cars is way easier to work on. You don't have to disassemble the entire dash just to get at the expansion valve or evaporator assembly, the parts are typically cheaper (ever price a climate control panel on a 85.5+ versus an early one?)

The only thing I've found "harder" about the early car is access to the low-pressure port, which really ain't that bad if you have the car up on ramps and the body pan off.
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Old 01-20-2006, 02:32 PM
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Porsche-O-Phile, I'll definitely agree with you on some of that. I spent so much money fixing the a/c on my 86 that I'm ashamed to tell anyone including the then six hundred dollars for that climate control module. It was definitely more than most people spend to purchase an entire car. That's when I decided to learn to fix a/c systems. Now that I have learned how to work on a/c, that repair would have been less costly, but still not cheap by any means. Fortunately, many of the parts are now less costly than when I replaced mine. I spent $1500 for the compressor alone and there are now many options instead of just that one. But Tervuren is right about a/c is something to consider.
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1990 944S2 Cabriolet
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Old 01-20-2006, 04:07 PM
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Ouch.

There's some good stuff on Griffith's site for guys wanting to get into DIY a/c repair. . . Also check out the Freeze-12 website. Seems like a decent alternative to either "real" r12 or r134a. I'll probably try it in one of my cars when I get around to servicing the a/c systems. . .
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Old 01-20-2006, 06:20 PM
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I Got a 6hp 100 gallon Tank. As long as it's 6hp then it's great for hoome use, It keeps up with my dad's Air hogging tooll known as a "Bondo hawk" It's for use for removing large areas of bondo.. If you want to buff a car that still has clear on it you use Rubbing compound first to remove the scratches then with a finishing compound to make it really shine.. Color sanding between coat's is a new one. If you know what you're doing you only need to shoot the car with a clear coat once. Here's the basics of painting a car.

Use a DA machine or a Die grinder 6" workes fasted and clean up all the areas you're going to work on.

Pull out all the dent's and hammer them out and get them as straight as possible.

Put bondo ( body filler) over all the places you have tride you're best to fix with hand tools and Feather it on.

Sand the places you just applied bondo to and make sure they are all straight he only bondo you wont left is whatever is needed to fill the dents ( use a block on flat area's that need a perfect flat surface)
* repeat the steps untill u are satis fied it's stright and smooth)

Da again the part's you just bondoed to make it smooth and DA the entire vehicle, you don't have to go to the metal unless you're paint was pealing off. ( take it down untill it has a flat finish)

Spray Etching primer, Or primer that prevents dust on any parts of the car you took it down to the metal to prevent any rust ( rust apear's in 1 day where i live) from you're hands or any other accident's

Go over the whole car one more time with a scuffign pad to make sure everthing is going to take to the primer

Primer the car, and let it dry for a few days to make sure it's dry all the way trew ( drive it for a few day's if need be.

Get some black spray paint and over spray the whole car lightly. The funtion of this is so that when you watter sand you sand untill there is no more black paint insuring you watersanded far enuff.

Get some laundry detergent and some scuffing pad's again and was the whole car ( everything you primered ) to ensure there is now greese or any oil that will prevent the paint from stick ( use the compressor to blow all the water and speed up the process )

Once the car is sure and dry Mask the whole car with tape ( old newspapers work great)

Shoot you're Base coat as many coats as needed untill you don't see the primer and the color you're painting is solid ( try yer hardest not to get any drips taker yer time)

FYI: if the car will be a light color use a light primer as close to the color that you want to paitn, Same goes for dark colors use a darker primer

Do a few coats of Clear coat , 3 good solid coat's gives you and awsome shine... Trick is to feather once again take you're time you don't want any drips' ( if you do don't worry )

Of corse let the clear dry, if you use a booth it goes by quick. But if at home let the car dry and Drive it around for a week or so maybe less to ensure the paint is dry all the way down.

Then to make it evern shiner hit it with soem high grit water sand paper ( forget wich grit but 2,000 sound's right )

Now after the car looks all crazy and a flat color again You hit it with rubbing compound with the buffer and then finish it up with a glaze then
You can use a carnuba wax hand glaze and bam you got a shiney lil car.


About you're last questions If you sand you're original paint past the clear and add clear again. My dad say's it's a no on because a new coat of clear may react wierd especialy if it's not same brand as original paint. More clear coat = more luster not less . Think of it as puting a diamond on display in thicker and thicker glass. the thicker the clear is the more abuse it can take and the longer it will last and you can buff it with rubbing compound and not worry about going down to the paint.


All above is they way i've leanred from my father who is PPG certified. Im not totaly sure on the grits for the DA, Bondow hawk, and for the watter sanding. I could ask him Just to remind myself of what the grits are and so you will know.

Hope there arent too many typos as my eyes are closing up heh
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Old 01-20-2006, 10:15 PM
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