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You've probably buttoned it all back up by now but some clear pictures of how to properly tension the belt would be helpful.

That's certainly something I have been asked more than once.
Old 04-07-2015, 05:38 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #101 (permalink)
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Mark, you need to remove that idler pulley before doing the tensioning, per the factory manual.

If you want to be comprehensive you should also include the autotensioner procedure for the '87+ cars. It's only slightly different, but would be helpful to the community.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:38 PM
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Do I have a chance to set the proper tension without the Porsche special tool?
I only have a Krickit tensioner. But I've never used it, just bought with the belts to have everything available if I start the change.
Car has been driven about 20.000kms since last change, but it is already 4 years now. (But the car has been rested nearly 2 years untouched.) Is it time for change now?
Shall I only change the belts or the rollers also? What about the water pump?
I have bought the belts about a year ago. But I do not know how much time they have spent on the shelf at the store. Does it make sense?
Sorry for the newbie questions.


In the timing belt replace article pictures have been shifted from step 3 on.

Last edited by Jimmy76; 04-07-2015 at 10:40 PM..
Old 04-07-2015, 10:38 PM
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Jimmy76,

Krickit tension gauge works well as long as you have the correct one.

At 20,000km's and 4 years the belts should still be okay.

The water pump is a different thing, do you know how old it is?

I would check the belts and re-tension them.

Personally I change the belts every six - seven years if the car has not done the 45,000 miles which is recommended.
Old 04-08-2015, 03:56 PM
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I edited the Timing Belt image order above - sorry about that!
Old 04-10-2015, 08:57 AM
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Back to basics! Safely Jack Up & Support Your 951

Before we tore into our 944 Turbo, we covered a few basics including how to safely jacking up and supporting the car. Here are a few steps below but you may read the entire how-to article here: How To Safely Jack Up and Support the 944 Turbo

There are so many projects where raising your Porsche is a must for accessibility. For both first timers and DIY regulars alike, raising a car into the air and supporting it can be a stressful task but when following the steps in the above article, you'll complete this with project with confidence!

First off, buy yourself a quality floor jack and jack stands. A quality jack along with quality stands will last forever; we prefer the AC Hydraulic floor jack and Esco stands. It's important to use jack stands to support the car and not just a floor jack alone. Before you begin jacking up the car, make sure that all four wheels are carefully chocked and that the car is on a level surface:



The 944 has a center lifting point for when you are jacking up the vehicle. This allows you to safely lift one side of the vehicle at a time and leaves you room to place jack stands. You can also safely lift the rear of the car from the transaxle or the front cross support beam. Locate the jacking point in the center of the car and place your jack securely under it (red arrow):



Once the car is in the air, utilize the designated jack stand points. This is important as you don't want to damage the floor of your 951 by placing a jack stand in the wrong area. Click the link above for those jack points. Finally, you can raise the rear by using the transaxle as a lifting point as shown below:

Old 04-20-2015, 01:41 PM
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I suggest not using the front factory jack point in Figure 6 (red arrow) as they are known to collapse and damage the underbody. I would only use the front frame rail for supporting the front via a lift or jack stand or the front crossmember with flat topped jack stands.

A local friend i know has used the front jack point and the jackstand punched through the floor board. Thankfully its a track car. Plenty of other experiences with this also from old threads.

Assuming this is a write up for newbies, i would suggest a blurb about making sure the lift arms do not crush the rocker panels or side trim pieces. Bump the lift button a few times and double check the pads are in contact with the frame before the lift arms touch the rocker panels. This seems to be a common mistake when placing the car on a 2-post lit; the 944 is difficult to lift i think especially when lowered because of how short the front and rear lift points are spaced together unless the lift posts are abnormally far apart. The front lift arms typically need to be at the shortest position so there is usually no clearance between the arm and underbody. This may seem obvious but unfortunately its not to many; look at how many 951's are around with the front rocker trim pieces broken or missing!
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Last edited by Techno Duck; 04-21-2015 at 03:26 AM..
Old 04-21-2015, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Techno Duck View Post
I suggest not using the front factory jack point in Figure 6 (red arrow) as they are known to collapse and damage the underbody. I would only use the front frame rail for supporting the front via a lift or jack stand or the front crossmember with flat topped jack stands.
That's funny, because I've used that center factory jack point probably 1,000 times with no trouble. Everything I've read in the past says that the yellow points that they're using is that they're prone to collapse. Like I said I routinely use the center rocker point, but I use the inboard frame rail in the front, and before I removed my torsion bars, I used the T-bar caps just like I did on my 911. Now that I have removed the T-bars, I turn the stands sideways and place them on the flat aluminum surface of the torsion tube. This works on a lift too. I wouldn't be afraid to use any of the factory points if I got in a jam and that's all I could access, just wouldn't make a habit of it.

As a side note I was used to using the front inboard frame rail on my 944s when I bought my first Miata. Tried to use the same part on that car and it collapsed as if it was made of chewing gum wrappers.

Also, I would NEVER use the transmission on these cars unless it was a junker or a parts car. Maybe more of you are doing it and having good luck, but that rubber trans mount doesn't seem robust at all, and it's like $300 to replace with new.
Old 04-21-2015, 06:19 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #108 (permalink)
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Great replies guys! Before lifting any vehicle it's important to check the jack point area for rust or corrosion as best you can. Our California car is rock solid and the factory points are strong.

Techno Duck - you make a great suggestion regarding the rocker panels. Yes, it's easy to deform them if the jack pad doesn't have a spacer; hockey pucks work well.
Old 04-23-2015, 08:56 AM
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How To Set Your Engine at Top Dead Center

Need to set your engine at TDC?

You will be setting the engine at TDC when the number one cylinder is at the top of its compression stroke. Remember that the crankshaft rotates twice for every single rotation of the camshaft, so if you simply set the crankshaft to TDC without looking at the position of the camshaft, you may actually be at TDC on the exhaust stroke for cylinder #1. So, after you set the crankshaft, double check the camshaft sprocket to make sure the camshaft alignment mark is at the TDC position as well.

You are going to be turning the main crank pulley with a 24mm or 15/16 socket to get the engine into the TDC position. It's easiest to access the pulley from underneath the car - a lift comes in handy at this point. Here's a shot from underneath, engine tray removed and red arrow pointing to crank pulley:



If working alone, you may also access the pulley from above after removing the air filter box:



Either from above or below, you'll utilize a 24mm socket on the main crank bolt and you'll turn the engine clockwise. It's also a good idea to remove the #1 spark plug and place a wooden dowel or rubber hose into the cylinder to tell when the piston has reached the top of its stroke. We used a rubber hose but avoid using something metallic:



There is a viewing port just above the distributor cap in the one o’clock position (red arrow). You can look in through the view port to verify the cam is on the compression stroke but do not use this to lock the motor in the TDC position, make sure to use the marking on the flywheel for absolute accuracy:



Use the viewing port to determine TDC on the flywheel is down on the left rear of the engine just beside the speed reference sensor. It is buried down behind the oil filler cap and viewing it while turning the engine is very difficult if not impossible (red arrow). If you are working by yourself make small adjustments until you are sure the engine is at TDC:



As you are rotating the engine clockwise you will first see the letters OT on the flywheel, continue turning the engine until the scribe mark (red arrow) on the flywheel lines up with the tab in the other side (green arrow). You may have to stick your finger into the port and clean up the flywheel to see the scribe mark but if you have already checked the cam marking and dowel in the number one cylinder you should be close so you don’t have to clean the whole flywheel. You can now lock the flywheel in place:



Here is the complete DIY article on this topic:
How To Find Top Dead Center on Your 944 Turbo

We're posting new articles every day! Check out the entire 951 tech article library HERE
Old 04-24-2015, 09:00 AM
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Here's a perfect First-Time DIY!

Changing your own hood and hatch shocks is a great and easy way to get started on DIY, or “Do It Yourself” projects. It should take you less than 30 minutes to do both the shocks on the hood and rear hatch. When replacing the shocks, you'll need to have a friend hold the hood up or prop the hood with a broom stick handle or something solid. The hood is surprisingly heavy and you don't want it falling on you when you are working.

The rear hatch shocks contain electrical connections and are different side to side. If you do not get the right shock for each side, your interior light may not work or stay on constantly and you can also lose the function of the hatch defroster. Make sure to check when ordering to ensure you have the right parts.

To view the entire DIY article, click How To Replace 944 Turbo Hood & Hatch Shocks

Front Hood Shocks
After safely and securely propping the hood, locate the shock mounts on both sides of the hood:



Don't be surprised if you come across hardware that's not original:



With the hood supported and pressure off of the shock, remove the fasteners/typically clips at either end of the shock:



The lower shock mounts can vary over the years but they should utilize a ball on the mount and a socket in the shock. These old shocks needed the cap pried out to release the ball from the socket (red arrow):



Before installing the new shock make sure to clean and lubricate the ball mount (red arrow):



Just push them on and they will clip in place. Note that if the shocks you're removing have this modern socket with a clip, you'll need to gently pry open the clip to free the shock:



Rear Hatch Shocks
After safely securing the rear hatch with a solid prop or even better, a buddy, notice that the left side shock contains the electrical connection for the rear window defroster. There is a small tab on the top and bottom of the shock (red arrow). Remove the electrical connection and replace the shock:



There is an electrical connection for the interior light on the base of the right side shock (red arrow). Remove the electrical connection and replace the shock:

Old 05-04-2015, 10:31 AM
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what's going on with this project? It just stops out of nowhere
Old 05-24-2015, 04:29 AM
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anything on this thread...? did it hit a speed bump...engine ever start...?
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Old 03-24-2016, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
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anything on this thread...? did it hit a speed bump...engine ever start...?
Hello! All the articles that we got out of it currently are here: Porsche 924/944/968 (1975-1995) Technical Articles - Pelican Parts. At the moment, the 944 is on hold to finish another project car.
Old 03-30-2016, 02:39 PM
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2 Years Later ..... What Happened To This Car / Project ?
Old 03-08-2018, 01:33 AM
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