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Oil Leak

So the revival is officially underway. First order of business is new rubber on all four corners. Tires should arrive tomorrow. I decided to go with the Firestone Firehawk Indy 500's. Oh yeah, I should mention that the lost anti-theft lug nut key has been found! YAY!
I searched the car inside and out and finally looked in the ash tray and there it was. So I no longer have to drill the locks out.

With the wheels removed I got closer to figuring out where the oil is leaking from. On the front, I have a torn CV boot and in the back, I am not sure where it is coming from. See picture below. Can this result after over-filling with engine oil?? This photo was taken from the right rear wheel well. The former owner changed the oil, so it was been dripping for more than a month. About one drop every few minutes.




Old 03-25-2018, 06:22 AM
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The good news is I have new rubber on all four corners. The bad news is that I did not look very closely when I thought I had a torn CV boot on the front. Upon closer inspection it is the steering rack boot which seems to indicate I need a new rack. Crap. This must be age related as I would not expect a rack to leak after only 25,000 miles. I barely touched the boot and it came apart and a bunch of oil came out. Sigh. I also did battle with the fuel filter replacement. Eventually I won, but it was not easy.
Getting the rear filter connection undone was easy, the front, not so much. After giving up and reading everything I could find on the net, I went back at it and in the end, undid the filter from the stuck coupling thinking I would have more room to work on the coupling. Well yes, but now there is nothing to support the lines making it difficult to exert any torque without damage to the lines. So I went deeper into the engine bay and undid the next connection point which was not stuck. This allowed the line with the stuck connectors to be removed and placed into my bench vise and finally I freed up the stuck connectors.

Does anyone put any paste or tape on the threads to prevent this hardship in the future?
Old 03-30-2018, 12:11 PM
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Absolutely incredible!! Congratulations on the ultimate find. Iíll be following your story.


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Old 03-30-2018, 01:45 PM
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Looking at the posts on Pelican, it’s very strong on the 911, not nearly as much on the 964. If you want more timely help it may be best to cross post on Rennlist.

Re the oil leaks, it’s likely the oil pressure sensor o ring etc in that area above the right side of the engine.
Old 03-31-2018, 11:44 AM
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Thanks John,

Not sure how to cross post. Is there a way to link posts between the two sites?
I will do a closer inspection of the oil leak when I change plugs and check the valve clearances. Priority right now is to find out why the fuel pump is not working.
Old 03-31-2018, 12:11 PM
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Power steering drive oil seals from the right side camshaft.
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Old 03-31-2018, 12:27 PM
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There is also an o-ring behind the power steering belt housing that gets hard and leaks oil. Hard to get to but doable.
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1993 964 C2 still makes me smile
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Old 03-31-2018, 12:39 PM
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Parts needed.

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Old 03-31-2018, 12:45 PM
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I would also check the J hose that runs above this area. They have been known to break around the hose clamp and leak oil.
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-01-2018, 10:09 AM
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A pain to replace the o-ring but doable.
Picture shows cylinder 6 with the power steering belt housing moved out to replace o-ring.

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1993 964 C2 still makes me smile
1996 318ti (280k miles)
2011 Silverado for hauling (32k miles) - SOLD
2018 Suburban Z71
Old 04-01-2018, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TorqueHead View Post
Thanks John,

Not sure how to cross post. Is there a way to link posts between the two sites?
I will do a closer inspection of the oil leak when I change plugs and check the valve clearances. Priority right now is to find out why the fuel pump is not working.
Thereís no way to link apart from copying and pasting URLs. Best to choose one place for each thread.

Re the fuel pump, you can remove the cover under the car and apply voltage directly. Iíd do this before assuming the pump is dead.
Old 04-01-2018, 04:11 PM
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Thanks guys, this is all good info and I really appreciate it.

In regards to the fuel pump, I removed the access panel and pulled the pump down so I could access the terminals. I left the fuel lines connected. I removed both wires from the pump and then applied 12 volts to the terminals being careful to observe correct polarity. The pump made a very slight humming noise but no fuel made its way to the fuel filter. I know this because currently the fuel filter has been removed and replaced with a jug to catch any fuel. I used an ammeter to measure the current at 11 amps while power was applied to the pump.

So I am thinking the pump is likely seized. Is there any chance the in-tank filter is plugged and the pump seized from running dry? I guess I will find out when I disconnect the lines to the pump. Oh what fun that will be.
Old 04-02-2018, 12:20 PM
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I hate to say it but this is why I recommended a complete engine drop and through going through. It is a rarity that you find one like this and I have seen engines detonate because the process was rushed.

Your problem could be any number of things. I had a 90 I converted to a track car It sat untouched for 10 years and I found all sorts of obscure problems I would have never figured out unless I took everything apart inspected it and reassembled.

Not saying it can't be done this way but my experience shows me it is less energy to get things done properly by going inch by inch.
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-02-2018, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
I hate to say it but this is why I recommended a complete engine drop and through going through. It is a rarity that you find one like this and I have seen engines detonate because the process was rushed.
You might be right Cobalt and if so, I will humbly accept an "I told you so" but one thing you don't know about me is that I never rush. I take my time. I work slowly and methodically and document the process. I figure I will probably drop the engine out at some point, but not before I hear it run first. I want to hear what might be wrong and I want to see where it leaks while running and observe the tailpipe emissions and learn whatever I can before I consider dropping the engine. This is not to say I think your approach is wrong. In fact if I had an unlimited budget and lots of time, I would probably do it your way, but once out it would get a teardown right to the crank.

So, first I will fix the fuel flow problems. Then see if it will start and see how it sounds and how much oil leaks out and where the leaks are.

One good thing that I learned recently is that this car has never had ethanol fuel and thus the insides of the fuel lines should be pretty decent. The other really big plus is no rust. I have crawled all over the car and cannot find any body rust anywhere.
Old 04-03-2018, 08:49 AM
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I hear ya I just have been down this path with other cars in like condition and it just ended up being the easier and safer approach.
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Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-03-2018, 01:18 PM
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Need new fuel pump

I pulled the fuel pump today but first I completely emptied the fuel tank with a hand operated vacuum pump. Bench testing of the pump confirms it to be dead.

There are lots of good articles on replacing the fuel pump, but one little detail seems to be missing - exactly how to disconnect the banjo bolt. It seems easy enough until you try to get a wrench on the back side nut. No ordinary wrench will fit, so you either have to grind one to fit or use needle nose vice grips inserted at an angle. I have included a photo I took once I had the pump on the bench to show how little clearance there is. I tried but was unable to remove the blue plastic shields. I also tried to use a wrench without grinding it and all I managed to do was to round the corners off the nut so vice grips became the tool of necessity.

Old 04-05-2018, 11:20 AM
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Sounds like a good time to buy more tools.

You need a flair nut wrench. Never hurts to buy a full set.
https://www.mactools.com/en-us/Expert/Wrenches/a0dff30b-312c-41fd-8e01-a47200cd1a33/Metric-Flare-Nut-Wrenches/E112312/Flare-Nut-Wrench-15mm-x-17mm
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-05-2018, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
You need a flair nut wrench
Thanks Cobalt but I tried that. The sides of the flare nut wrench are still too thick to allow it to fit between the blue shields of the electrical terminals.
Old 04-05-2018, 01:13 PM
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Mine works but it is old and couldn't find a similar one to post the Mac looks close. You need to find one with thinner sides or the reason I have so many tools. I just modify them if needed.

Although the new pump should come with a new one installed.

Most brake flair tools need to be modified as well to work with some brembo calipers.
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others

Last edited by Cobalt; 04-05-2018 at 01:22 PM..
Old 04-05-2018, 01:19 PM
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I think that is one big advantage of expensive tools like Snap-On and Mac; they use better steel and thus can make thinner wrenches.

I started grinding on a sacrificial 17mm wrench and got it to look right by eye, but I also grabbed my vice grips beofore I wrestled my way under the car. I ditched my creeper because it puts my nose about 1" from the floor of the car. Anyway once in position I realized I did not grind enough off the wrench so I gave the vice grips a try and it worked.
Old 04-05-2018, 01:31 PM
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