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Cobalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
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LOL

I give you a lot of credit i used to wrench on my cars that way but getting too old and worse blind. I don't work on cars unless I have a lift anymore.

You can fix most anything with a pair of vice grips and a small sledge hammer.
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-05-2018, 02:40 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #61 (permalink)
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You hit the nail on the head Cobalt. Us old guys should not have to crawl under cars anymore.
I would not mind so much if I could use a creeper and that is why I have my eye on the QuickJack that our host sells. It was quite an ordeal to get the car up to its current height with just axle stands and a floor jack.
Old 04-05-2018, 02:46 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #62 (permalink)
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How tall is that banjo bolt ?
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Old 04-05-2018, 06:58 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #63 (permalink)
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Best tool purchase so far https://youtu.be/z7bItwgq9lk
Old 04-05-2018, 07:36 PM
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Whenever we pulled a motor from long-term storage, we Pre-Oil it before starting it.

We used a 5-gal Pressurized Paint Bucket with 2 gals of oil and a pressure regulator set at 40psi.

Using some made up fittings (I have lots of hose and fittings) we run a coiled plastic hose over to the main oil galley and run the clean oil into the motor. With the plastic hose you can see the oil flow thru it.

By pulling one or two covers you can see when the motor is fully lubed.

Naturally if the motor is stiff then you have to oil the cylinders with Marvel "Mystery Oil" or such before anything else.

This procedure has served us well over many years.

Len - formerly of Autosport Engineering, now retired and still love these cars.

Old 04-06-2018, 02:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmax View Post
How tall is that banjo bolt ?

Here is a picture from our host's How-To section that shows the pump and the banjo bolt.
The nut you need to restrain is the thin 17mm brass nut below the banjo while you turn the thick 19 mm cap nut on top of the banjo.



Old 04-06-2018, 04:51 AM
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Hey John,
That's an awesome lift. Fast and high!

Len that sounds like a great idea. Is it difficult to rig up? Where exactly do you tie into the engine and do you recirculate or would I have to drain out two gallons of oil to make up for the two being added?
Old 04-06-2018, 04:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TorqueHead View Post
Here is a picture from our host's How-To section that shows the pump and the banjo bolt.
The nut you need to restrain is the thin 17mm brass nut below the banjo while you turn the thick 19 mm cap nut on top of the banjo.
If I understand these fittings correctly, there's no need to restrain that 17mm, just turn the 19mm and either it comes off, likely or the entire assembly with the 2 nuts and banjo do.
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Old 04-06-2018, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmax View Post
If I understand these fittings correctly, there's no need to restrain that 17mm, just turn the 19mm and either it comes off, likely or the entire assembly with the 2 nuts and banjo do.
Well I wish it had been that easy. On mine the entire banjo assembly started to turn in the pump body. So at this point the hose won't let you turn very far so you have to spin the pump off of the banjo assembly, but you cannot do that because the threaded studs for the electrical connections on the pump stick up too high and hit the steel crimp on the hose.

If I had known for sure that the pump was bad, I could have cut them off, but in hopes of saving the pump I simply used needle nose vice grips at an angle to secure the thin 17mm nut.

Perhaps the diagram below will be helpful as this is a fancy banjo bolt that incorporates a check valve.

Item 37 is the banjo bolt/check valve. It is screwed into the pump housing with the thin, integral 17mm nut.

The fuel line banjo (part of item 12) slides over the item 37 banjo bolt and is secured by item 22, the 19mm cap nut.

The problem arises because the thin 17 mm nut is nestled down in between the two electrical terminal posts making wrench access difficult if not impossible. The pump cannot be spun off the banjo by rotating the pump because the terminals on the pump stick up too high and hit the steel crimping on the hose.

When I got the pump off I verified that my flare nut wrench would not clear the terminals either. If you have a set of very thin wall flare nut wrenches then that might work, if you can work the wrench past the crimp and the banjo. Anyway I just wanted to give others a heads up, so they can be somewhat better prepared for this challenge when swapping out their fuel pump.



Old 04-06-2018, 12:05 PM
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We connected the new Oil line at the Oil Pressure switch point or the Oil Pressure sender depending on what is most convenient.

Our engines were stored and had been drained.

If you haven't changed the oil yet this is the time to use the new.

I you already have, then drain out the oil into the Pressurized Tank and feed it through under pressure so it lubes every point that normally gets oil.

Len

Old 04-07-2018, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxsterGT View Post


We connected the new Oil line at the Oil Pressure switch point or the Oil Pressure sender depending on what is most convenient.

Our engines were stored and had been drained.

If you haven't changed the oil yet this is the time to use the new.

I you already have, then drain out the oil into the Pressurized Tank and feed it through under pressure so it lubes every point that normally gets oil.

Len

Len,

Would really like to see this set up you use to prime the oil system. Good to use on a 2.2 engine?

Thanks!
Old 04-07-2018, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxsterGT View Post


We connected the new Oil line at the Oil Pressure switch point or the Oil Pressure sender depending on what is most convenient.

Our engines were stored and had been drained.

If you haven't changed the oil yet this is the time to use the new.

I you already have, then drain out the oil into the Pressurized Tank and feed it through under pressure so it lubes every point that normally gets oil.

Len

Thanks Len. I had a look and it does not look easy to get to those connection points with the engine in the car.
Old 04-10-2018, 04:16 PM
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Looked for a photo of the Tank but must be in my old laptop.

Here is one place we hooked up a line.......



...at the Oil Pressure sender next to the engine mount. Don't remember the thread sizes but will look them up.

Len

Old 04-10-2018, 05:33 PM
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3 week update

It's been 3 weeks since Sleeping Beauty arrived. Progress has been slow.
So far:
New tires have been installed.
Brakes were visually inspected and look brand new.
Installed new battery.
Shark fin repairs well underway.
Fuel filter, fuel pump and gas tank have been removed.
Gas tank has been cleaned and flushed.
New fuel pump and new in-tank fuel filter are on their way.
Fuel & Oil filters are already on-hand.
New hood and decklid shocks are on their way.

Here are a few pix.








Old 04-12-2018, 05:44 AM
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Holly clogged arteries. No wonder your not getting any fuel.
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Anthony PCA affiliate '77 member '83 '90 3.8 RS tribute, '93 964 C2, '93 928 GTS 5 speed, '94 Turbo 3.6, M '15 Boxster GTS18 Macan GTS
Gone worth mentioning '71 E '79 SC, '79 built to '74 3.0 RS tribute (2390 # 270 hp), '80 928 euro 5 speed, '74 2.0l 914, '89 944 S2,'04 Cayenne TT '14 boxster, '14 Cayenne GTS many others
Old 04-12-2018, 05:53 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #75 (permalink)
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Fuel hose replacement

So I went down to the local hose and line shop to see if they could help me out with the gas tank hoses -suction hose and return hose. These are both short hoses but very expensive as they are formed hoses with tight bends. The guy at the shop inspected the hoses and figured they were still usable.

So I went home and spent hours cleaning out the dried up gasoline and was very pleased with the result until I used my inspection camera to scope the inside of the hose. The camera revealed some residue that remained but more disturbingly, showed linear cracking or stress lines of some kind. This was enough to make me bite the bullet and pay the obscene prices for two short hoses. I snapped a few photos of the inspection camera screen showing the inside of the return line. Sorry for the poor quality.
964.201.581.02 suction hose
964.356.583.01 return line




Old 04-14-2018, 05:15 AM
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I was under the car today looking at the hard lines that run from the pump to and from the engine. Both lines are disconnected while I wait for a new pump to arrive.
The return line had some semi-dry gasoline sludge in it so I got the bright idea to connect an air line at the engine end to blow the lines clean. Good plan with bad execution. Two mistakes:
1) I got the lines mixed up.
2) Did not put a catch container at the other end.

The only line I had disconnected in the engine bay was at the fuel filter so I hooked an airline to it and set the regulator for 15 PSI. I gave it a shot of air, and heard interesting noises from underneath the car. The floor was now covered with about a 1/2 cup of gasoline which I quickly wiped up. No lights were underneath and I did have the fire extinguisher and garden hose nearby. Whew.

Because the return line had no liquid in it, I was not expecting anything other than sludge to some out. But blowing on the fuel filter line does not put pressure on the return. Dumb dumb dumb. I did not think that through.

On the bright side, I now know I have or will have clean passage of gas right from tank to filter so that's a good start. Next I need to figure out a good connection point to put air into the return line from the engine bay. I have looked, but I cannot trace the path of the return after it leaves the front of the engine bay. Anyone know of a good, easily accessible connection point?
Old 04-15-2018, 11:05 AM
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Fuel return from engine?

Would item 14 be the return line on a 92 964 C4?
It comes off the back of item 17 pressure regulator.

Old 04-15-2018, 03:45 PM
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Yes, fitting #15 is the point for the Return of fuel back to the Tank.

Len

Old 04-15-2018, 05:10 PM
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You are make great progress. Please keep posting your results. Thanks to Len too for posting more on the oil prime system.

Thanks again.

DJ.
Old 04-19-2018, 06:29 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #80 (permalink)
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