Pelican Parts
Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   Pelican Parts Forums > Porsche Forums > Porsche 924/944/968 Technical Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Author
Thread Post New Thread    Reply
Registered User
 
Geoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: central NJ
Posts: 110
Garage
Clutch system bleeding question

So with my new clutch MC, slave, and hose installed, I went about bleeding the system using this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdf--suwqw0

bleeding up from the slave using the oil can pump. The brake fluid filled the slave and MC (I assume) because the reservoir filled up as well. I started with the reservoir partially full. Now, when I push on the clutch pedal, the pedal doesn't return, it stays down. I guess I don't understand what causes the pedal to come back up. Does this mean there is still air in the system? Or does the MC rod need its length adjusted? I set the length so it was the same as the old one I removed. Thanks.
Old 02-25-2017, 12:01 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1 (permalink)
9FF 9FF is online now
Registered User
 
9FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,529
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoman View Post
...Does this mean there is still air in the system?
Yes, keep bleeding.
__________________
Mike A
9TECHNIK | TRANSAXLE ÄRA
1986 944 (Street); 1986 944 (Track); 1986 951; 1989 951 (3.0L 8V); 2000 996 Cab.
Old 02-25-2017, 02:01 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: va
Posts: 2,120
Garage
Even with this method, you need to have the reservoir filled fully so it is above the clutch line or air gets into the clutch.
Old 02-25-2017, 05:28 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Geoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: central NJ
Posts: 110
Garage
O.K. I'll keep at it.

Yes, the fluid level in the reservoir was above the hose level. Thanks though for the tip.
Old 02-26-2017, 03:49 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,317
I second the idea that you have to keep going. It took me a long time by myself. I pushed the pedal down, went under, opened valve and closed it before all pressure was out. Repeat. Angle of car helps?... also, knowing when bubbles are out ... there can be very tiny hard-to-see bubbles. Bottom line : solid pedal absolutely required no matter bubbles or no.
Old 02-26-2017, 04:24 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Geoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: central NJ
Posts: 110
Garage
Sounds like a plan. I'm going to follow Clark's Garage method:
----------------------
Bleeding Method 2

Install the slave cylinder into the clutch housing.
Raise the rear of the vehicle as high as possible above the front of the vehicle.
Have an assistant depress the clutch pedal and hold it to the floor.
Open the bleed nipple on the slave cylinder. Have a bucket and rags ready to catch any brake fluid that spills. When fluid / air stops coming out, close the bleed nipple.
Have the assistant release the clutch pedal. The first few times the slave cylinder is vented, the clutch pedal with have to be pulled off the floor.
Repeat steps c, d, and e until clutch pedal operation feels normal.
Old 02-26-2017, 05:02 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #6 (permalink)
 
Registered User
 
campbelljj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Weeki Wachee FL
Posts: 426
Garage
my method after several attempts resulting in hours to get clutch back.
jack car from passenger side and support on stands front and rear. Push clutch pedal to floor and employ a device (stick) to keep the pedal on the floor. Attach power bleeder to master reservoir and apply 10lbs of pressure (no fluid just air). make sure reservoir is filled completely. crawl under car with a box and open wrench and open bleeder. close it quickly. remember there is very little fluid in the clutch line portion of the master reservoir. you cant extract a significant amount of fluid from the clutch slave. wait 5 minutes (I crawl back out from under the car and inspect reservoir). This allows the fluid to migrate back to the front left portion of the reservoir which transfers rather slowly. Continue this process until you have solid fluid exiting the bleeder. tighten the bleeder wipe up area. Inside the car the stick or whatever you used to hold pedal down will be on the floor as the pedal has completely collapsed at this point. Now slowly and I mean very very slowly pull the pedal with your hand to the up position. This should take 30-45 seconds or longer if you can. The idea is do this really slow. Your pedal should feel great and return on its own. If it doesn't there is still air in the line and you will need to repeat this process. This method works great for me and I hope it works great for you.
Old 02-26-2017, 05:47 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Geoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: central NJ
Posts: 110
Garage
Update: ended up getting the Motive pressure bleeder and bingo, bubbles came out, the clutch pedal nice and firm and springs back up after being pressed. Bled the brakes as well after installing new rubber hoses. That was even easier. So, I guess it's +1 on using a pressure bleeder! Thanks all.
Old 03-01-2017, 05:56 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
flash968's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: O.C. CA
Posts: 4,588
yeah - i don't know why so many people resist. it's the only way to do this. all other methods are hit and miss at best, and always take a long time. the motive is a no brainer, and it's ridiculously cheap, when you consider how much time it saves, given that you have to flush the entire system every 2-3 years. it pays for itself in time savings the first time you use it in time saved, if you count your time as a cost, as i do, because any minute i waste wrenching on a car is a minute i am not making money.
Old 03-02-2017, 04:52 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #9 (permalink)
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

 


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:35 AM.


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page
 

DTO Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.