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Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: British Columbia, Canada
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Question Spring Compressors and Parts Cleaning

I have disassembled the heads on my engine now. I always wondered why I had a noisy valve on cylinders 1 to 3, and found the problem. A broken valve spring. It's a good thing to find.

So, what type of valve spring compressor works on a Porsche head? The book shows a KD 380 being used. Is the the only type?

The next question is what is the best cleaner for parts cleaning. I have seen Castrol super clean recommended here. But, I was thinking about water blasting, (low pressure) on the aluminum parts. Anybody try it? I would think it would be easier on the environment.
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Old 07-10-2005, 08:59 AM
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I just use a regular valve tool from the local auto parts store.

Some of the water based cleaners can damage the aluminum surface. I prefer to use Varsol which is kind of like kerosene.
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Old 07-11-2005, 05:40 AM
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I agree, some of the citrus based cleaners attack aluminum so be careful. Don't leave the AL parts sitting around with the 100% citrus solution on them. The new mega bucks parts cleaner my head machinis got uses citrus cleaner but the strenght is way down...maybe this makes the stuff safer. I used the Castrol super clean when I did my parts cleaning but was careful to wash off fairly quickly. I would see if you can find a parts cleaner to "borrow" will save a lot of time. I didn't try water blasting....but I can't think of a problem with it....some guys just now taking a 3.2 apart are using water blasting to get the first few inches thick of grime off. I would be careful around rubber or plastic parts and around the oil cooler or any place that has thin sheet metal also be careful that you don't blow water past seals....e.g. cam tensioner seals on the chain covers....there could be a few other places like that. If the parts are already apart then seems like water blast should be fine. For gasket residue I used Permatex gasket remover..works great and avoids gouging the surfaces. That's my 2 cents on that.
-h
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Old 07-11-2005, 07:07 AM
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Purchase one that is for your car, all major suppliers sell them if not purchasing locally.

What worked best for me when cleaning was water (under pressure, sure why not), taking above stated precations, follwed by hand with dremel/drill tip attachment (small circluar scotchbrite scuff pad). Brake fluid, affordable and not as bad on your skin. Don't use carbuator cleaner (its best for soaking carb parts). Rinse.

Once clean can beadblast/sand sheet metal et al. Once refinished may reassemble.

Many many hours later will bring you to this point.

And more importantly note that if having machine shop work on engine too they will clean in the heavy duty parts cleaners (similar to previously discussed above). They will charge you the time they put into your motor. So you can clean/polish/and/or paint the outside, and the results will show, everytime you reveal under your decklid, keeping in mind the machine shop will clean inside of the case. Bead blasted surfaces retain finish best if do not smear/wipe them, to keep completely free of oil.

I am presently preparing to continue cleaning a 3.2 that is back from Porsche machine shop. The finish is different coming out of the parts cleaner. Now, I'm gathering alcohol, clean wipes. A clean room is another thing.

Good luck.

Regards,
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Old 07-11-2005, 08:00 AM
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Additional note....when cleaning the tranmission be sure to block off the vent and speedo sender hole because you may have it (the sender) out by then. Stay away from the input shaft, shift rod and output flanges. Water and/or citrus cleaner in the tranny is not good...

I may have mentioned this before but when I took my motor apart I saw many places on threads that had a residue..probably came from citrus or soap of some kind...in the future I might just use a damp rag or something less invasive.

-h
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Old 07-14-2005, 06:15 AM
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For the valve springs buy the C clamp model spring compressor. For removing carbon from heads, you can use fuel system cleaner and medium wire brush attached to a drill.
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Are you car loosing power? When was last time you service your fuel injectors? Dirty fuel injectors? Why no try a complete fuel injector cleaning service and return the dignity to you car. Visit www.rennsportfuel.com and we will return your injectors back to life!
Old 07-14-2005, 09:24 PM
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For cleaning greasy engine parts, I've moved away from the water based cleaners because they seem to leave "baked on" crud that is really tough to get off. Near as I can tell they desolve the oil out and leave the dirt, that "drys" rock hard in the absence of the oil. Now I use denatured mineral spirits (the "unscented" kind that still smell, but not as bad) and oil-based crud just comes right off with only some minor wire brushing. The key difference is that the mineral spirits don't allow the dirt to "dry", but rather floats the dirt and oil off at the same time. A screw driver helps in the corners.
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Last edited by jluetjen; 07-15-2005 at 05:12 AM..
Old 07-15-2005, 05:08 AM
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Sounds like this would work I'll try it...
I haven't noticed the dirt drying but I do notice white deposits in threads where I think the remaining citrus collects and dries.
I think on open areas that can be rinsed well the citrus is still a viable choice because it is cheap and doesn't do too much harm otherwise. It does dry out your skin if you don't use garage condems.
-h
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Old 07-15-2005, 06:19 AM
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Water Blasting worked fine for me. It actually worked great on the finned areas after a little engine degreaser was applied.

Shrouds and sheet metal were a breeze.

Of course, plan on getting extremely dirty because the stream will eventually find an area that sends the water spray right back at you - grease, grime and gunk.
Old 07-17-2005, 06:36 PM
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Shoq, I did that (water blast at a local car wash) with a type IV motor and what was left on the motor was like cement. That's when decided to just switch to mineral spirits and now everything comes off easy.
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"It's a poor craftsman who blames their tools" -- Unknown
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Old 07-18-2005, 05:33 AM
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It is amazing how some of the grease/oil just cooks and glazes itself on to the surface.

What was nice about the power wash was that it allowed me to knock the grime off without having to handle each piece and scrub them with a brush.

My next rebuild, I will take the car into the wash area prior to dropping the engine and then I'll take the parts individually. (Of course be careful to not blast the air intake or electronics). When I dropped the engine originally, I was so filthy from the years of oil leaks and grime that there should have been a new name for how dirty I was.
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Old 08-01-2005, 09:34 AM
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