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K. Roman's Avatar
 
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Absolute Necessary Tools for Rebuild

I'm talking about special tools now, ones that only could be used for rebuilding an engine. I'm in the process of a rebuild and don't want to buy the Dowel Pin Extractor if I don't need to.
I think this could be a useful thread for other rebuilders on a budget.

Thanks.
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Old 10-25-2005, 11:35 AM
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Check my 20 dollar cam tool post. Most of the tools are not needed IMHO. the dial indicator w/stand is the one one that you can't do without, you might be able to borrow/rent from a local Pelican who has one.
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Craig Owen
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Old 10-25-2005, 12:44 PM
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engine Yolk
cam holder tools (early or late)
crows foot (early cams)
flywheel bolt 12-pt tool
z-block
dial gauge
dial calipers
bore gauge
micrometer

FYI: the above are the tools I've had to borrow for a rebuild. The last 2 are not needed if you are having a machine shop measure/inspect p's, c's, crank, etc.
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Charlie Stylianos
1982 SC Targa
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Old 10-25-2005, 12:45 PM
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Wayne's Book (which also lists the tools that you'll absolutely need).
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"It's a poor craftsman who blames their tools" -- Unknown
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Old 10-25-2005, 02:26 PM
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I agree with most of the above.....except

Z block- can use clamp on stud ala Waynes book.
Boreguage - even with one unless you use it everyday your measruments will not be reliable - ask me how I know. Find a friendly engine builder.

Cam tools - since they are only used very infrequently ask someone nicely ( Bottle of wine maybe flowers for the wife ) or hire them if available
Old 10-25-2005, 04:05 PM
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Just get one of these and spend about $100,000 bucks to fill it up.



Oh yeah, kstylianos covered most of the basic stuff you would need.
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Old 10-25-2005, 04:46 PM
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What they said. I have and would suggest Waynes book, Bruce Andersons book, the Haynes manual, and the Porsche workshop manual. I end up referring to all of them. If you have to choose just one, go with Waynes. It's the most useful for the DIY.

P.S. You can use use the threaded end of a spark plug to extract the dowel pin from the cam sprocket.
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Old 10-25-2005, 06:41 PM
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Yeah, I have waynes 101 projects, rebuild book, bruce's book, a Bentley manual, and a haynes manual.
What else with tools?
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Old 10-25-2005, 07:02 PM
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Should we start adding everyday tools?

-Torque wrench
-13mm swivel. Will really help around those pesky CIS runners:
-SSI wrench. If you are installing new, it comes with the exchangers, if installing used, source one.
-Piston ring compressor
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Charlie Stylianos
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Old 10-25-2005, 07:19 PM
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I prefer to use engine egg whites with my engine stand.
Old 10-26-2005, 06:32 AM
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Refer in the garage for the beer!! Tivo?

(sorry for the non-seriousness) most have covered the basics..

How about a selection of sealants and loctites?
Old 10-26-2005, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Boreguage - even with one unless you use it everyday your measruments will not be reliable - ask me how I know. Find a friendly engine builder.
I'm just curious about your statement about the boreguage, so I'll have to bite and ask how you know... I've always considered mine reliable and accurate, I'm wondering if I'm missing something. I wouldn't think there is a inherent problem with not using it everyday
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Old 10-26-2005, 01:47 PM
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Jim,

I bought a set of telescopic bore guages. After a few hours I could get reliable readings. But only after trying many different techniques.....tongue out/in head to left/right eyes closed/open/one o pen. In the end I went to a rebuilder and within a few minutes I had the results, and removed all doubts. If I purchased again I would get a set of manual extending guages.

If you are an engineer and regularly measure you get a feel for things. Why waste valuable time attempting to get the feel and living in doubt.

Cheers

Mark........
Old 10-26-2005, 04:34 PM
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You really need a granite measuring table or a milling machine to setup and use the dial bore gauge reliably, in my opinion. I agree with Mark, and I have a *lot* of machine shop hours under my belt...

-Wayne
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Wayne R. Dempsey, Founder, Pelican Parts Inc., and Author of:
101 Projects for Your BMW 3-Series 101 Projects for Your Porsche 911 How to Rebuild & Modify Porsche 911 Engines 101 Projects for Your Porsche Boxster & Cayman 101 Projects for Your Porsche 996 / 997
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Old 10-27-2005, 01:32 AM
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As with any precision measuring tool, it all depends on the user.
In my shop I have machinists and mechanics who have spent their entire adult life measuring parts and there is always a variance from one use to the next. We have even established an acceptable variance limit from one person to another, .0002".
If one of my employees can't measure a part within .0002" of what I measure it to be, he gets a lesson.

A dial bore guage is more or less a production tool, useful when measuring many identical parts. A precision table makes it easier but is not manditory for an experienced inspection tech.
A good old inside micrometer is better for onesies and twosies like measuring barrels IMO but it should always be checked against an outside micrometer that has been checked against a standard.

If anyone of my shop employees got caught reading an inside micrometer instead of setting it and then measuring it with an outside mic, they would get a lesson.

The hardest part to precision measuring is teaching the correct feel. A micrometer should have a noticeable drag on the part being measured with no slop but should be able to fall past the tight spot with nothing more than gravity.
The best way to develop that feel is to start with a standard and measure it several times.
Then get a part that is round and straight and measure it to the 1/10,000th"
Write that number down, then measure it again. Keep going until you can get the feel and nail it every time.

Also note that someone who is very good can actually feel the difference in a reading caused by holding onto the micrometer too long. It gets warm from your hand and grows.
We store and calibrate our mikes and guages at 70 degrees F. and on some of the extreme precision parts we have to compensate for temperature when measuring to calculate tolerances.
Old 10-27-2005, 11:56 AM
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